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AMD unveils Epyc chips, Ryzen Threadripper, and first Vega GPU

AMD unveils Epyc chips, Ryzen Threadripper, and first Vega GPU

AMD's chief executive Lisa Su has officially unveiled the company's first Naples processors, now known as Epyc, along with a 16-core, 32-thread enthusiast chip dubbed the Ryzen Threadripper.

AMD has officially unveiled a raft of high-end products aimed at the enthusiast, data centre, and workstation markets, including a new name for its Naples server family: Epyc.

Unveiled by AMD chief executive Lisa Su during the company's financial analyst day, the bulky Epyc processor range is designed to compete directly with rival Intel's Xeon family. In its initial incarnation, the processor family formerly known as Naples scales to 32 cores and 64 threads per socket and two sockets per server with no word on a potential four-socket variant. The chips are designed, where they can, to equal or better Intel's equivalents: up to 128 PCI Express 3.0 channels embedded directly into the system-on-chip (SoC) design, eight DDR4 memory channel per socket for up to 4TB per server, what AMD describes as a 'highly-optimised cache structure', and an Infinity Fabric coherent interconnect for linking two Epyc chips together in a dual-socket system.

'With the new Epyc processor, AMD takes the next step on our journey in high-performance computing,' crowed Forrest Norrod, senior vice president and general manager of enterprise, embedded and semi-custom products at AMD. 'AMD Epyc processors will set a new standard for two-socket performance and scalability. As we demonstrated today, we see further opportunity with the industry’s first no-compromise one-socket solutions. We believe that this new product line-up has the potential to reshape significant portions of the datacenter market with its unique combination of performance, design flexibility, and disruptive TCO.'

At the same time, AMD unveiled the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition graphics card, the first commercial product built around its next-generation Vega graphics architecture. Designed for machine learning and advanced visualisation in the data centre and workstation markets, the card boasts 64 Vega compute units with a total of 4,096 stream processors linked to 16GB of High Bandwidth Memory 2 (HBM2) video RAM for an estimated 25 trillion floating point operations per second (teraflops) in FP16 precision and 13 teraflops at FP32 precision. According to AMD's internal testing, that equates to a 30 percent uplift over the most powerful machine-learning GPUs available today and a 42 percent uplift over the Nvidia Titan Xp for 'selected professional applications'.

For the enthusiast, AMD also shared a 'client compute' update with the announcement of a new top-end Ryzen chip: Ryzen Threadripper. Designed to sit at the very top of the Ryzen tree, the Threadripper boasts 16 cores and 32 threads with expanded memory and input-output bandwidth compared to the existing Ryzen 7 family. No official launch date was offered beyond the promise of 'summer 2017' availability, which puts it slightly ahead of the entry-level Ryzen 3 CPU family with a third-quarter launch schedule. At the same time, AMD confirmed that Ryzen mobile accelerated processing units (APUs) codenamed Raven Ridge and offering four cores and eight threads with embedded Vega-architecture graphics would be heading to devices in the second half of the year. Finally, Ryzen Pro - the company's business-centric processor family - is scheduled to land in the second half of the year on the desktop and in the first half of 2018 for mobile devices.

Towards the end of AMD's presentations, the company offered a brief overview of its roadmap for future processors. Zen 2 and Zen 3, the company claimed, will be 7nm process parts, while Vega will be replaced by Navi on the same 7nm process. The company also promised to extend its Infinity Fabric interconnect technology beyond the data centre and workstation markets, hinting at 'highly-scalable SoCs and platforms that meet the growing demand for high-performance compute and graphics technologies'.

Details on Epyc and the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition can be found on their respective product pages, though AMD has yet to add Ryzen Threadripper documentation to its website at the time of writing.

8 Comments

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Maki role 17th May 2017, 11:31 Quote
Those are some ridiculous numbers. I'm very curious about the "Threadripper" chip though, if their pricing is right it could be a really successful option IMO. Being able to pack that many threads into say the cost of a 6900k (maybe a bit ambitious that...) would be an instant success I would have thought for video work, of which there is such a large market now.

I do hope that 16GB will make its way onto the consumer cards too (given HBM2 it should do right?). Nvidia has been dragging 12GB along and it's frustrating. I may not be able to use an AMD card for Cycles flawlessly, but at the least it could prompt Nvidia to drop their own 16GB cards into the mix.
Vault-Tec 17th May 2017, 14:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maki role
Those are some ridiculous numbers. I'm very curious about the "Threadripper" chip though, if their pricing is right it could be a really successful option IMO. Being able to pack that many threads into say the cost of a 6900k (maybe a bit ambitious that...) would be an instant success I would have thought for video work, of which there is such a large market now.

I do hope that 16GB will make its way onto the consumer cards too (given HBM2 it should do right?). Nvidia has been dragging 12GB along and it's frustrating. I may not be able to use an AMD card for Cycles flawlessly, but at the least it could prompt Nvidia to drop their own 16GB cards into the mix.

I'm being rather hopeful about the prices. Two 8 core Ryzens cost less than a bag of sand, so I am hopeful they can get it in at around a grand. That said they're not a charity, and will likely murder Intel's pricing on Xeons any way so maybe it will cost more..

Also hopeful that by the time they come out Ryzen will drop in price a little and the 10 core may come in around £500? that would be amazing

Either way it's nice seeing AMD "back" in this segment.
Wakka 17th May 2017, 14:46 Quote
Very smart approach by AMD, the CCX/Infinity Fabric structure really has given them the tools to scale this architecture up AND down while not relying on huge, expensive single die solutions.

They just need to get it working flawlessly and keep pricing competitive and Intel will go from shitting bricks to squeezing out a meteorite...
runadumb 17th May 2017, 17:03 Quote
Really interested to see how the mobile APU's work out. Fancy one in a cheap chinese tablet to compete with the current M3 chips
blackerthanblack 18th May 2017, 10:06 Quote
I'm looking forward to the APU's too, would be great for some small powerful HTPC's (those Zotac boxes with one of these and some RF capability would be fantastic), or laptop that can do some light gaming without being overly expensive.

I think over on Hexus they claimed AMD has got some commitment from the 'big 5' OEM's. If that's true and they can get some good mobile APU's into manufacturers products then they really will be making inroads. That's assuming Intel doesn't do the dirty like last time - I take it people will be watching out for that or something similar now, won't they?
jrs77 18th May 2017, 10:29 Quote
Yeah, it's a real shame that they still don't have any real news on their APUs.
Vault-Tec 18th May 2017, 14:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackerthanblack
I'm looking forward to the APU's too, would be great for some small powerful HTPC's (those Zotac boxes with one of these and some RF capability would be fantastic), or laptop that can do some light gaming without being overly expensive.

I think over on Hexus they claimed AMD has got some commitment from the 'big 5' OEM's. If that's true and they can get some good mobile APU's into manufacturers products then they really will be making inroads. That's assuming Intel doesn't do the dirty like last time - I take it people will be watching out for that or something similar now, won't they?

Going to the "Big 5 OEMs" bit. I'm 99% certain that they have a deal going with Dell/Alienware. Not in the APU side, but the HEDT side. A couple of benchmarks came out recently in an OEM Alienware machine showing, IIRC, the 10 and 12 core Ryzen chips. I also saw some benchmarks come from Alienware using X299 too.

So being a bit of an Alienware buff I am not sure if they are going to be coming in the existing 2015 Area 51, or whether Alienware have a new model coming out. They usually reserve the Area 51 for high end. The 2015 came as X99 only, with no quad core models being available. So yeah, seems like Dell/Alienware will be producing rigs with Ryzen chips in.

Which is pretty sweet for AMD :)

https://www.overclock3d.net/news/systems/asus_rog_tease_their_first_ryzen_powered_notebook/1

So Asus are in too :)
Anfield 18th May 2017, 14:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vault-Tec
I'm being rather hopeful about the prices. Two 8 core Ryzens cost less than a bag of sand, so I am hopeful they can get it in at around a grand. That said they're not a charity, and will likely murder Intel's pricing on Xeons any way so maybe it will cost more..

1700 is £300, so even £1000 would give them an extra profit margin on the 16 core beast, that is 6900K price territory and Intel adding 2 more cores is going to be nowhere near enough to catch the Ripper.

But what I really want is to play fly on the wall when the ASRock Engineers brainstorm ideas for the boards it goes into:D
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