SteelSeries Apex M750 Keyboard Review

Written by Dave Alcock

September 8, 2017 // 12 p.m.

Tags: #apex-m750 #keyboard #mechanical #qx2-switches #review #steelseries

Software

So far, the SteelSeries Apex M750 does seem a little expensive for what you're getting hardware wise, but this is just part of the package. SteelSeries' software is usually very good, and this is where the little extra cash may be worth it.

This is the first screen you see when you have installed your SteelSeries software. If you have multiple SteelSeries products, they will all show up here and you can control them all independently. 

The main bulk of the software controls the RGB lighting. You can create some great effects or, if you like, you can simply choose from one of the many options already available.

As with any good keyboard software, you're able to remap most of the keys on the Apex M750. You can also program the keys to launch applications, control media, or run macros. We recorded a macro so that we could press a single key and type 'www.bit-tech.net', and it worked like a charm. You can easily edit the macro after recording, and you can delete the delays between keystrokes if you wish. Overall, the macro recording and reprogramming experience is very positive.

You can also set multiple profiles and have them automatically start when you run specific applications. If you are jumping into a game of CS:GO, as soon as you hit that launch button, the keyboard changes to your CS:GO layout. It takes some time to set up, but once done it is fantastic.

There are a few other settings you can play with but nothing out of the ordinary. The main two options here are polling rate and LED brightness.

Something that SteelSeries does very well is enabling other software, games, and utilities to work alongside its hardware. With the Apex M750, there are loads of different applications that can display custom lighting effects on your keyboard. For example, you can make it so that if you get mentioned on Discord, your keyboard flashes or changes colour. This also works in certain games like CS:GO, and you can actually see a health bar made up of LEDs on your keyboard. Okay, it is a little bit gimmicky, but it's still a pretty cool and well executed idea that brings a bit of functionality to something that is otherwise entirely aesthetic. Even here, I have only brushed the surface of what the software can do, especially when it comes to incorporating other programs to work with the hardware; if you have the talent and knowledge, you are even able to make your own apps that do so.

Conclusion

The SteelSeries Apex M750 has been a really nice keyboard to use. We did pick up on some annoyances, such as the feet, but these may not even be an issue for you at all. The keyboard looks very nice - simplistic while retaining the recognisable Apex style we're used to from SteelSeries. The addition of the aluminium top plate is very welcome, as compared to the Apex M800 it makes the keyboard a lot more sturdy, gives it a nice weight, and makes it look a lot more grown up. The software is also very powerful and user-friendly, and SteelSeries Engine 3 continues to be one of the best packages around, especially when it comes to integration with games and programs, Discord being a particular highlight.

The QX2 switches are fantastic, although switch preference does change from person to person. I'm not usually a fan of Cherry Reds or variants based on them, such as these, but strangely I got on really well with them. Usually, I can't wait to get back to my Cherry Greens or Clears but not in this instance.

In fact, the only real downside to the SteelSeries Apex M750 is the price. Now, it is worth the money in terms of user experience, hardware quality, and instinctive software, but when you look at other keyboards around the same price point, they usually have just a little extra. Some come with wrist rests, some come with additional programmable macro keys, and some come with dedicated media and volume keys. Ducky, Corsair, Razer, and Logitech all have products at the same price point, yet they all come with a few extra features. Okay, for some the software isn't as good or as useful, but if you are not going to be using the software that SteelSeries provides, then the M750 probably isn't your best option. Of course, many people spending this much on a keyboard will relish the idea of tweaking the software, and if you are after a keyboard with very powerful software, excellent lighting effects, and a rather sleek design, then the Apex M750 would be great for you. All in all, it comes down to what you want out of your keyboard; if you can forego a few extra niceties for a solid software experience instead, we recommend taking a good long look at this keyboard.


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