EVGA teases dual-socket LGA2011 SR-X

February 14, 2012 // 11:23 a.m.

Tags: #evbot #evga #intel #lga2011 #lga-2011 #motherboard #sandy-bridge-ep #sr-x #xeon

EVGA has released a teaser image of its upcoming SR-X dual-socket LGA2011 motherboard, and while it's keeping launch details a secret the picture tells a story of its own.

Promising 'more details soon,' the company posted a teaser image of a production-status SR-X board complete with its final heatsink design to microblogging service Twitter to keep its fans assured that development continues apace.

The image shows that EVGA has, unsurprisingly, chosen to cover all voltage regulator modules (VRMs) in aggressive-looking heatsinks, while the chipset itself gets a surprisingly compact yet wide-area heatsink of its own to keep things cool during overclocking.

The picture reveals 12 memory slots, eight situated in two banks of four by the first processor socket and an additional two banks of two by the second, which suggests support for a total of 96GB of DDR3 memory for those that can afford it.

Seven PCI-Express 3.0 slots are included, all of which appear to be full 16x slots and which are known to include support for both Nvidia's SLI and AMD's CrossfireX multi-GPU capabilities. As is becoming increasingly common on high-end enthusiast boards, switches for disabling individual PCIe slots are provided for improved stability when overclocking. EVGA has also added voltage read points.

Designed for use with Intel's Sandy Bridge-EP Xeon processors, the board requires plenty of power. Both CPU sockets have an eight pin and a six pin power connector each, although two of these can be left disconnected if only a single CPU is used.

Additional features rounding out the board include six SATA and four SAS ports, two eSATA ports, six USB 3.0 ports, and dual gigabit Ethernet ports. EVGA has also previously confirmed that its EVBot tweaking tool will be fully supported by the board.

What EVGA isn't sharing, however, is potentially the most crucial point of all: the price. With buyers having to invest in the high-end server-oriented Sandy Bridge-EP Xeon series of chips in order to make use of the dual socket design, a system with the SR-X at its heart is unlikely to come cheap.

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