EVGA launches DIY Configurator service

June 20, 2017 // 10:17 a.m.

Tags: #bld #build-picker #component-picker #diy-configurator #evga #nzxt-bld #parts-picker #returns #rma

Component maker EVGA has announced its entry into the parts recommendation and shopping engine market, launching the EVGA DIY Configurator in the hope of making every possible component in a person's next build carry the company logo.

Following hot on the heels of NZXT's data-driven BLD component shopping system, which aims to recommend parts based on target frame rates generated from a database of 'over 10 million and counting analysed gaming hours', EVGA's DIY Configurator is considerably simpler: Users are asked to choose a graphics card, gaming case, and power supply from a list of EVGA-only components which the company claims are offered at 'the best pricing possible'.

A GPU, case, and PSU, though, doesn't make a full rig: Although these components are listed as 'required', and a purchase can't be made without all three, users are also given the option of adding a motherboard, cooler, and peripherals to their bundle - but not, it must be noted, a processor, memory, or storage. The components are also provided boxed and ready for assembly, further distancing it from NZXT's BLD where the parts are assembled and tested before dispatch.

According to EVGA, the DIY Configurator has a range of advantages over just heading to your favourite e-tailer and picking parts yourself: The company claims it 'provides a simple and convenient solution to purchase key components [...] eliminates the need to hunt for deals for your favourite EVGA parts and track multiple packages from multiple retailers [and means that] all components arrive at the same time, which minimises delays.' The site also offers discounts based on how many components a buyer picks up.

There are, however, some distinct disadvantages listed in the service's small print: 'Additional coupons, discounts and promotions do not stack with DIY Kit discount,' the company warns, before adding that 'MIR [Mail-In Rebates] may not apply.' A bigger caveat comes in the company's returns policy: 'Once purchased, individual components may not be returned for a refund. DIY bundles will not be refunded in whole or in part if a price change occurs after purchase. In accordance with EVGA's Store Terms, DIY bundles may only be returned for a refund after requesting and receiving an RMA, and all individual components of the DIY bundle are returned to EVGA' - meaning that if you have cause to return a faulty graphics card for a refund, you'll have to return your case, power supply, and potentially motherboard, cooling setup, and peripherals at the same time.

The EVGA DIY Configurator does not appear to be active in the UK at the time of writing, but the European version can be found via the company's official website.
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