AMD graphics shipments grow, says Jon Peddie

August 19, 2014 // 10:50 a.m.

Tags: #amd #discrete-graphics #geforce #graphics-hardware #integrated-graphics #intel #intel-hd-graphics #nvidia #pc-gaming #radeon #tegra

Graphics industry specialist Jon Peddie Research (JPR) has released figures that suggest AMD could be overtaking its rival in the shipment stakes, thanks perhaps to its presence in both the Xbox One and PS4 consoles.

According to the company's research, AMD has seen its graphics part shipments - which includes both discrete and integrated hardware - increase 11 per cent quarter-on-quarter, while Intel's shipments have grown four per cent. The loser for the quarter was Nvidia, with JPR claiming that its graphics shipments have dropped 8.3 per cent quarter-on-quarter. Overall, the industry watcher claims that the market has risen 3.2 per cent quarter-on-quarter - although this is offset by a major drop in the first quarter of the year, leading to a 4.5 per cent decline compared to Q2 last year.

The most interesting number to come out of JPR's report into the graphics market, however, is that the market for add-in graphics hardware - discrete cards, in other words - is down 17.5 per cent in favour of integrated graphics hardware. For AMD, that's not bad news: the company offers both discrete GPUs and x86 processors with integrated graphics. For Nvidia, it's something the company will need to reverse somehow: while Nvidia builds ARM-based chips with integrated graphics, it lacks an x86 licence and cannot create all-in-one processors to compete with Intel and AMD.

'Graphics chips are without doubt one of the most powerful, exciting, and essential components in tech today: not only does every computer require one (or more), but the technology is entering into major new markets like supercomputers, remote workstations, and simulators almost on a daily basis,' claimed Jon Peddie of his company's report. 'New technologies and compute programs are taking advantage of the ability of GPU power to scale. On top of that, PC gaming momentum continues to build. It would be no exaggeration to say that GPUs are becoming the 800-pound gorilla in the room.'

None of the companies named have responded to the figures included in the report.

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