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Hard disk supply could take two years to recover

Hard disk supply could take two years to recover

The floods in Thailand have caused hard disk prices to soar as component production grinds to a halt.

It could take up to two years for hard disk component suppliers in Thailand to get back to pre-flood production rates, according to DigiTimes.

The site's sources claim that Japan-based HDD motor supplier Nidec had over 2,000 pieces of equipment damaged by the floods, most of which will be beyond repair. The site also claims that companies have turned to grey markets in attempts to find suppliers for parts.

Prices of hard disks have sky-rocketed in recent weeks due to lack of supply, with old stocks quickly running dry. Models with 2TB capacities have doubled in price to around £140, and the once bargain-tastic 1TB Samsung F3 now retails from anywhere between £80 and £100 - just a few weeks ago the same hard disk could be had for around £30.

One industry that could come out of the crisis better-off is that of SSDs. Largely unaffected by the Thai floods, the sit's sources suggest that SSD-equipped PCs and laptops, in particular ultrabooks, could see a boost in sales with the supply of hard disks proving to be non-existent. With most component suppliers potentially out of action for months, if not years, it's possible hard disk prices won't drop to pre-flood levels for some time.

Are you planning a storage upgrade? Have you had to spend over the odds to purchase replacement hardware? Let us know in the forum.

114 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
the_kille4 7th November 2011, 09:56 Quote
I was planning on a storage upgrade since my current 1TB drive is decreasing in space and by year end it would be full.

As I am also thinking of a new build and update my HTPC with a NAS drive before I go to uni.
Abhorsen 7th November 2011, 09:56 Quote
I timed my upgrade terribly, flood happened on the Thursday iirc and i got paid on the Monday..

However Amazon chose to sell 2TB Seagate drives for £78 last week so there are still some drives at more reasonably prices.
Krikkit 7th November 2011, 09:58 Quote
It's all well and good SSD's stepping up to try and start beating mechanical drives, but what are we going to do for cheap bulk-storage? I can't honestly say I want to pay £80+ for a 1TB drive.
sitech71 7th November 2011, 10:02 Quote
Good news for the retailers.....
Most if not all of them have well and truly jumped on this bandwagon.
I believe the word for it is "Profiteering".
Should we put up with this? Should we name and shame these retailers?
EG: Before the floods this retailer had 50plus stock of the segate momentus xt 500gb at below £100
Now the same drive. And the same stock £269.99....They must have been to the same schoool of pricing as the petrol companies.
I say everyone stop buying mechanical hard drives and buy ssd's only. Then watch the prices move down.
People Power is a great voice.So lets not just be sheep!
Cei 7th November 2011, 10:09 Quote
A small group of nerds off an Internet forum will have no impact on pricing - the real cost is going to be paid by the manufacturers such as Dell, Asus, Apple, HP etc. They need huge numbers of drives and will be very prone to price rises - and they can't turn round and childishly yell "stick it to the man" either.
sitech71 7th November 2011, 10:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
A small group of nerds off an Internet forum will have no impact on pricing - the real cost is going to be paid by the manufacturers such as Dell, Asus, Apple, HP etc. They need huge numbers of drives and will be very prone to price rises - and they can't turn round and childishly yell "stick it to the man" either.

Your missing the point. We as consumers are not wholesalers nor are we "nerds". We are the people that keep these companies in business. We can make a difference. But only if you have a can do attitude.
Cei 7th November 2011, 10:18 Quote
No, you're missing the point. An average user on here, being highly computer literate and a self builder, will buy a handful of drives in a year. Take the entire membership and you have a few thousand drives.

Dell will use many times that in a day. As the end consumer we have basically no buying power over a product that is predominantly sold to OEMs. Simple economics.

EDIT: oh, and a retailer won't care if you just buy SSDs either, they're still making a profit. Bar some very early price jumps, the increased HD prices will be from the channel, not retailers deciding upon a 200% jump - their profit margins may well remain static.
Kasvain 7th November 2011, 10:30 Quote
I was planning a storage upgrade, but not anymore because of DOUBLES
sitech71 7th November 2011, 10:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
No, you're missing the point. An average user on here, being highly computer literate and a self builder, will buy a handful of drives in a year. Take the entire membership and you have a few thousand drives.

Dell will use many times that in a day. As the end consumer we have basically no buying power over a product that is predominantly sold to OEMs. Simple economics.

EDIT: oh, and a retailer won't care if you just buy SSDs either, they're still making a profit. Bar some very early price jumps, the increased HD prices will be from the channel, not retailers deciding upon a 200% jump - their profit margins may well remain static.

Well I guess I've woken someone up? My point!
Stop buying them. And see what happens.You never know....
V3ctor 7th November 2011, 10:39 Quote
Couldn't be any true this... my notebook drive had to be replaced last week, a Samsung 470 128gb cost me 100eur, a 500gb 2.5 WD cost me 80€. The difference was so small, so I went to the SSD. Speed over Gb. :D
liratheal 7th November 2011, 11:08 Quote
..Wow.

Hopefully the replacement manufacturing process will be on the second floor?
Hopelessness 7th November 2011, 11:09 Quote
Sheer profiteering it is not, the retailers push the prices up to ensure they still meet revenue targets whilst selling less. They WANT to sell less so that their stock lasts throughout the crisis.
Bungletron 7th November 2011, 11:17 Quote
Yes a lot of the comments here do not seem to understand the laws of supply and demand. When a commodity is plentiful its price will be correspondingly low, the more rare it becomes then the price must increase as long as demand stays high. Additionally market forces such as competition have also been affected since all hard drive manufacture appears to be either entirely or partly located in this region.
loftie 7th November 2011, 11:20 Quote
I feel sorry for the people in thailand, but I would have thought that the HDD companies would have not put all their eggs in one basket. I'm in need of a new HDD, and, as always, I seem to need my new components at the worst possible time!
faugusztin 7th November 2011, 11:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
Well I guess I've woken someone up? My point!
Stop buying them. And see what happens.You never know....

Uhm, nothing will happen. That is his point. 180 million hard drives made per quarter, probably 130 million of those sold to big computer manufacturers, maybe 30-40 million sold to local small computer manufacturers, maybe 10 million directly to customers worldwide. Now if you get 110 million of hard drives produced instead of 180 million, you got a shortage. What will happen if those 10 million refuse to buy the drives ? More drives for the remaining channels, but the price will not change.

PS: My numbers are of course wrong, i just pulled them from my hat (except the 110m and 180m numbers, those are from manufacturers and expected production drop), but you can bet that end user market percentage is in single digits compared to total production.
rowpie 7th November 2011, 11:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
EG: Before the floods this retailer had 50plus stock of the segate momentus xt 500gb at below £100
Now the same drive. And the same stock £269.99....They must have been to the same schoool of pricing as the petrol companies.

Not trying to defend said retailer here but you will find that a lot of the large web stores list the real time stock levels from there suppliers and not what they have in stock themselves.

As such as soon as there suplier puts the price up they need to raise theres as they havn't actually paid for those 50 plus drives yet.
Sarakon 7th November 2011, 11:54 Quote
I was gonna get myself 2 * 2TB, but i was only paid on the 31st, was then going to buy them on the weekend, but prices where already double...so this is going to be a fairly long wait....
Brooksie 7th November 2011, 12:05 Quote
I was going to get a 2tb hard disk a month ago and thought £55 I'll wait until they go below £50. That really very annoying as the same hard disk is now over £100.
eVoPhantom 7th November 2011, 12:18 Quote
Glad I picked up a spinpoint at the same time I ordered my new monitor a month or so ago!
DragunovHUN 7th November 2011, 12:47 Quote
Quote:
the sit's sources suggest
NethLyn 7th November 2011, 12:48 Quote
Just did a quick tally and I'm only using 1/5th of my capacity, meaning if my Spinpoint F3 died, I'd still have enough room for what's currently installed on just the 500Gb. I'll just have to do my best to wait out the shortage, download less, and use more USB sticks alongside optical media if the solid state market doesn't seem to be affected.

Have Externals not gone up as far or as fast, just because there's still loads of them around?
the-beast 7th November 2011, 13:35 Quote
My HD failed over the weekend and I nearly had a heart attack when I saw the prices. I got a 1TB drive (Not the one that failed) in Jan for £40 and now they want over 3 times that!

Looks like I will be using an old 400GB IDE drive. No way am I going to pay such extortionate prices!
mrbens 7th November 2011, 13:49 Quote
Quote:
Models with 2TB capacities have doubled in price to around £140
That's more than doubled. I paid £51 for a 2TB a few months ago!
Tongue-of-Fire 7th November 2011, 14:16 Quote
I planned to get a 2tb WD green last month but decided not to because it wasn't urgent and I thought I could wait until the last minute and save money. Now my F3 1tb had started making clicking and scraping noises and though it's still under warranty I'll lose all my data if it dies since I haven't got anything to back it up to. Hopefully the increase in demand for SSD's wont raise their prices so I can afford to get a good 120gb boot drive (Ahh, who am I kidding? Of course SSD prices will increase if demand for them does!)
Spreadie 7th November 2011, 14:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by NethLyn
Just did a quick tally and I'm only using 1/5th of my capacity, meaning if my Spinpoint F3 died, I'd still have enough room for what's currently installed on just the 500Gb.
Yup, similar situation here. I'm much closer to my capacity, but my spare 500GB spinpoint and my external drive will more than cover my needs; if my 1TB drive pops it's clogs.

It would prompt a much needed clearout too - there's around 200GB of movies on it that I just don't watch all that often. If I get an itch to watch a particular movie, it's only a trip up to the loft to fish out the DVD.

I think I can hold out until prices start to come down.
GiantKiwi 7th November 2011, 15:45 Quote
Starting to think my investment in a large stack of bluray writables wasnt so stupid after all.
Blackshark 7th November 2011, 15:49 Quote
Having planed a purchase of a Synology DS712+ and DX510 loaded with 3TB drives.... I cant believe I did not buy the drives when I had a chance. Still, it happens. Not the first time, wont be the last.
[-Stash-] 7th November 2011, 15:51 Quote
No, it was =D
[USRF]Obiwan 7th November 2011, 16:17 Quote
A lot of people are getting enclosed hd's from stores like dixons and such and break it open to get the drive out, a lot of them are still sold at lower price.
Bauul 7th November 2011, 16:30 Quote
My F3 pretty much kicked the bucket (thank god for multiple partitions) the other week, but I paid circa £80 for it when it was new, so for me the price has basically stayed the same.

The F3 really does seem to have it's problems, not a harddrive for long life!
talladega 7th November 2011, 16:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GiantKiwi
Starting to think my investment in a large stack of bluray writables wasnt so stupid after all.
I'm thinking of doing the same. I've seen some going for less than $1 per disc.
Cost per GB bluray discs are a little more than half the price of hard drives. Would be good for making backups
GrahamC 7th November 2011, 16:50 Quote
This is not going to last 2 years, expect 6 months with a small premium still in place. Media scaremongers are just high on the juice.
NethLyn 7th November 2011, 16:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by [USRF]Obiwan
A lot of people are getting enclosed hd's from stores like dixons and such and break it open to get the drive out, a lot of them are still sold at lower price.

I'm assuming the fact that stores are stocked up for Christmas explains why externals haven't gone up as much (yet) if they already cost a little more for the enclosure. Anyone that needs a new drive, that might be the way round it - until those stocks also dwindle.
runadumb 7th November 2011, 17:07 Quote
Wish I'd bought that 3TB drive now. "£110 is a little much" I said. "Wait a bit longer and get it cheaper" I said. Well look what I got listening to my own advice.
Let that be a lesson to you. Never ever do what I advise :(
thehippoz 7th November 2011, 17:16 Quote
fixing one now.. drive looks like it's had it

just better to wait until they get it straitened out.. spinpoint is around 150
play_boy_2000 7th November 2011, 17:29 Quote
I added another 1TB drive to my raid5 array last xmas; $42 (£27 inc tax) was too good to resist, so I'm still rockin 1.41TB of free space. I also have a pair of 1.5TB disks in my NAS, but I'm thinkin I may sell those if the price is right.

Edit: Just had a peak at completed listings on ebay, and lots of drives 1TB and up are still going for as little as $50 + ship on this side of the pond.
Waynio 7th November 2011, 17:44 Quote
Had a feeling it would take a long time before they get back to nice prices so a possible 2 years, I hope my hdd's hold up well because I don't want to be paying £140 upwards for 2tb hdd when I should have bought a few 2tb drives a couple of months back @ £53 each I very nearly ordered some too .

I imagine in 2 years there will be 5 or even 10tb drives by then anyway.

In all my time on using PC's though I've not had 1 hdd die on me so don't know if it's because I keep them well cooled or because I use diskeepper to keep them always tidy & optimal or both or just plain luck or all the above :D.

And after saying that I bet they all go & die on me :).
Star*Dagger 7th November 2011, 18:10 Quote
This is not good, I have 27Tb of storage and wanted to upgrade to 50+ Tb. I guess this might help end the era of electro-mechanical hard drives in favor of SSD and the like.

S*D
The_Beast 7th November 2011, 18:43 Quote
I didn't think prices rose that much. I looked on newegg, I bought 2 F4EG for $70 each about 2-3 months ago. I just checked $230, that's triple the price and then some
Sloth 7th November 2011, 18:53 Quote
I was planning on building a NAS box as a Christmas present to myself, this blew all of that out of the water. With only a single terabyte of storage I'm almost guaranteed to fill that up within a year, let alone two. Due to this I've been seriously considering buying an additional SSD. Gives that slightest bit more storage and lets me have an SSD for Windows, an SSD for Steam and a mechanical for the rest. Or, when prices get back down to $100 per terabyte or so I may shell out for a little more storage.
DraigUK 7th November 2011, 19:14 Quote
This will probably do more for SSD sales than anything else they could have come up with short of drastic price cutting.

I'll probably get a 2nd SSD (a 128MB or so size will more then suffice for my personal Steam/games needs) and keep the current small 64MB SSD I have just for windows instead of jamming a game or two on there as well.

The 1.5TB mechanical storage I currently use will simply have to be enough until prices come back to more realistic levels, simple as that. No way am I spending that much $$$ on a hard drive, I would rather store data online instead.
DwarfKiller 7th November 2011, 19:29 Quote
I was planning on buying another f3, then I saw the price at £60 and thought better of it. I'd sooner be saving for an SSD at those prices.
Doctor Hades 7th November 2011, 20:28 Quote
My Steam games hard drive, a Seagate Barracuda, died over the weekend forcing me to buy another drive and I was shocked at the prices as I had no idea that the flooding in Thailand had affected the prices so badly. My previous Samsung Spinpoint F3 drive cost me £50 two years ago but the new one was £95! : O
sitech71 7th November 2011, 21:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
No, you're missing the point. An average user on here, being highly computer literate and a self builder, will buy a handful of drives in a year. Take the entire membership and you have a few thousand drives.

Dell will use many times that in a day. As the end consumer we have basically no buying power over a product that is predominantly sold to OEMs. Simple economics.

EDIT: oh, and a retailer won't care if you just buy SSDs either, they're still making a profit. Bar some very early price jumps, the increased HD prices will be from the channel, not retailers deciding upon a 200% jump - their profit margins may well remain static.

Hey Im not having a pop at anyone.And I agree that if anyone deserves the extra profit.It is the people of Thailand and not our Uk based companies. I am just saying you dont know how much you can or will change things unless you try. If we all have a "we can beat them attitude" and not a "lets give up before we start" attitude. (Glass half empty).Then how will you or anyone ever know. Facts figures and stats mean nothing. People have the power not Dell not HP and certainly not any uk based pc retailer. You and I have the last say. Stop being sheep guys and girls and stand up for youself.
The_Beast 7th November 2011, 21:49 Quote
Many of you guys keep bring up SSD as a fix but the fact of the matter is that the largest SSD is only 1TB and cost $500. That's way more than a 3Tb drive selling for $260 which is the capacity that most of us want/need. Unless SSD get bigger and cheaper really fast mechanical drives are still the way to go even at these tear inducing prices
Sloth 7th November 2011, 22:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Beast
Many of you guys keep bring up SSD as a fix but the fact of the matter is that the largest SSD is only 1TB and cost $500. That's way more than a 3Tb drive selling for $260 which is the capacity that most of us want/need. Unless SSD get bigger and cheaper really fast mechanical drives are still the way to go even at these tear inducing prices
I don't think anyone's meant them as a way to fix the problem, more as a stop-gap or alternative. For those who have already been considering them such as myself this increase in HDD prices has just made them a lot more appealling. On the balance of speed, cost and capacity mechanical hard drives often won out due to low cost and high capacity. Now they're not so competitive on cost while SSDs just keep gaining speed. Unless you actually need multiple terabytes it's becoming more appealling to trim down to 128-256GB and get a speed boost instead.

128GB Crucal M4 for $218, 150GB WD VelociRaptor for $199, or for comparison 73GB Seagate Cheetah for $269. If you want speed SSDs are the place to go, the VelociRaptor can't keep on speed and now its price isn't significantly lower while drives like the Cheetah are actually less cost effective.
l3v1ck 7th November 2011, 23:20 Quote
Thankfully I got a 2TB NAs box set up earlier this year.
On the down side, I won't be getting that portable HDD I was after now.
Nexxo 7th November 2011, 23:30 Quote
SSD's will of course also go up in price as their demand increases in response to rising HDD prices.

Hey, just pay the extra for the HDDs and see it as a charity donation towards helping a disaster-stricken economy get back on its feet.
Hazda 8th November 2011, 00:05 Quote
Was going to buy quite a few hdd's for my new build but this happened on the same day :/, guess it's time to get some SSD's before the price raises.
Another_level 8th November 2011, 00:08 Quote
Hopefully, the demand for SSDs will accelerate cheaper prices due to scale of economies.

Paying the extra for HDDs will likely to go into the greedy hands of the distribution channels. Better to donate direct to Red Cross instead.
Guinevere 8th November 2011, 00:18 Quote
[QUOTE=sitech71]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cei
You and I have the last say. Stop being sheep guys and girls and stand up for youself.

You really are living in cloud cuckoo land if you think consumers buying drives can have any effect on the price. Even if every single person who will buy one in the next six months doesn't... do you have any idea how difference that will make? It's such a tiny percentage compared to those that end up in server farms and off the shelf pcs and workstations.

The people who can really make the difference are the likes of Apple, HP & Dell. They go to the suppliers and say "If you put the prices up we'll go to your competitors as soon as they can meet our demands". In reality they are probably on fixed price supply contracts so no matter what they buy cheap for the next X months / years. Apple does that all the time, it's like the same way they book up all the available air-freight capacity for Christmas months in advance. They don't leave anything to chance - the risks are too great.

And what difference does this make?

It'll drive up the price of a raw OEM drive to anyone other than those with enough clout to strike a "Sell cheap or else" deal with the mfrs.

So expect to see drive prices stay high, some PCs will increase in price but Apple will be able to weather the storm (sorry) much longer than others.
Another_level 8th November 2011, 01:07 Quote
Hmm, if there's one price for the corporates and another price for the small guys then I'd rather not buy the product at all just for the principle of the matter.
KingSheepy 8th November 2011, 01:14 Quote
Well that's my 2x2TB RAID mirror out of the window. On the plus side, OCZ Vertex 120GB, here I come!
Bakes 8th November 2011, 02:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
Good news for the retailers.....
Most if not all of them have well and truly jumped on this bandwagon.
I believe the word for it is "Profiteering".
Should we put up with this? Should we name and shame these retailers?
EG: Before the floods this retailer had 50plus stock of the segate momentus xt 500gb at below £100
Now the same drive. And the same stock £269.99....They must have been to the same schoool of pricing as the petrol companies.
I say everyone stop buying mechanical hard drives and buy ssd's only. Then watch the prices move down.
People Power is a great voice.So lets not just be sheep!

In my NAS boxes I have 4 2TB hard drives. To achieve the same amount of storage with SSDs, I'd need to spend something like £2000.

I totally expect retailers to put their prices up - if they don't know how many of an item they'll be able to get in the future because supply has effectively stopped, then of course they'll put their prices up - it's simple supply and demand. For exactly the same reason, prices fluctuate massively week on week due to the wholesale price. I bet you weren't complaining when the memory and hard drive prices were dropping every week...

If the worldwide supply of hard drives drops by 30% (which it has been estimated to) then it won't be Dell and HP without hard drives - it'll be the standalone ones we buy.

Supply drops, price goes up.
sixfootsideburns 8th November 2011, 02:41 Quote
I started planning a 10TB RAID5 media server about 2-3 weeks before the flooding, and started pricing it almost right after it happened. Now when I'm ready to buy the prices (as we all know full well) have gone up 2x and totally killed that dream. On top of that all my internal PC storage is filling up at a rate that makes me nervous...

On the grander scale though its really hard for me to justify complaining though. Here I am talking about my storage issues and bitching about price increases, when all the people in Thailand are the ones really dealing with the problem. My heart goes out to every soul who has been effected by any of the recent natural disasters. Every time I feel like I'm getting the short end of the stick these days I try to consider how trivial my bullshit is in comparison. At least my house is intact and my family is safe.
sixfootsideburns 8th November 2011, 02:47 Quote
oops, double post
mediapcAddict 8th November 2011, 03:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopelessness
Sheer profiteering it is not, the retailers push the prices up to ensure they still meet revenue targets whilst selling less. They WANT to sell less so that their stock lasts throughout the crisis.

correct

high price = rationing.

everyone here is saying how they won't buy HDD's because the price is to high. that means only the people that really need them will buy hard disks everyone else will make do. This is the only way of maintaining stock during the dry spell ( bad choice of words but U know what I mean )

kinda proving Hopelessness's point.

I still p*****d off. I was going to buy 4 2tb drives and noticed the price had gone from around £50 to around £60 and thought they were raising in the run up to the holidays so thought I'd wait it out. ... look s like I've got a loooong wait on my hands.

also won't manufacturer's have long term contracts with oems they will have to honour first?
mediapcAddict 8th November 2011, 03:23 Quote
http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20111107PD219.html

digitimes update - HDD supply gap to narrow as Nidec resumes some production

reccommended reading - IF i've read it correctly the philipines and china plants are going to increase output ( ie my guess more over time/ night shifts ) and some of the thia plants are ready to come back on line however production of motors will still be down to 100 million from 140 million. article doesn't discuss manufacturing of other hard drive components. check it our for yourself.

http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20111107PD219.html
thehippoz 8th November 2011, 03:40 Quote
oh well gonna have to bite the bullet and get one.. wonder if I can get a used hd xD or one of those refurbished ones with all the midget pic stash on them when you run the recovery
zulu9812 8th November 2011, 06:33 Quote
I think that the flooding in Thailand is something of a distraction. i was under the impression that Thailand accounts for about a third of global hard drive manufacturing - but 40% comes from China. In fact, when one source of manufacturing undergoes a slowdown, market forces would normally dictate that a competitor with excess manufacturing capacity or the ability to expand capacity - like China - would take advantage and grab an increased market share. I wonder why this hasn't happened? I wouldn't put it past the Chinese government to throttle exports, specifically to drive up prices.
MrWillyWonka 8th November 2011, 08:16 Quote
Thankfully I upgraded my drives to 2 x 2TB just days before the price increases which saved me £220. I know some will be unlucky but it may well encourage people to sort out their hard drives and delete what they never use.
The_Beast 8th November 2011, 08:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillyWonka
Thankfully I upgraded my drives to 2 x 2TB just days before the price increases which saved me £220. I know some will be unlucky but it may well encourage people to sort out their hard drives and delete what they never use.

Hopefully DVD/optical media will stay cheap. I might just have to plug in my DVD drive again it's been at least 7 months since I've used it
sitech71 8th November 2011, 08:38 Quote
[QUOTE=Guinevere;2867251][QUOTE=sitech71]

You really are living in cloud cuckoo land if you think consumers buying drives can have any effect on the price.
And what difference does this make?

This is what I mean (Glass half empty). So if ocuk/scan/novatech/ebuyer/aria/yoyo and many others all stopped selling hd's from now and did not sell any for the next 3 months.You think they will just look at us and say "oh well you mean nothing to use".
No my friend they will re-act. Do you think dell are paying anywhere near the prices we are being charged...No.
Really from your comment and the comments of a few others I really do think your happy to just take price rises on the chin and say nothing. Fuel/gas/electric/food/Beer/Cigs and now our past time. PC hardware!
Stop being the sheep and stand upto be counted.
faugusztin 8th November 2011, 09:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediapcAddict
and some of the thia plants are ready to come back on line however production of motors will still be down to 100 million from 140 million. article doesn't discuss manufacturing of other hard drive components. check it our for yourself.

Considering hard drive production of 180m per quarter the drop of 40m motors is pretty significant. On other side, it pretty much matches the drop in production of WDC hard drives (30m) plus Seagate hard drives (5-10m) in this quarter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zulu9812
u was under the impression that Thailand accounts for about a third of global hard drive manufacturing - but 40% comes from China. In fact, when one source of manufacturing undergoes a slowdown, market forces would normally dictate that a competitor with excess manufacturing capacity or the ability to expand capacity - like China - would take advantage and grab an increased market share.

This would imply that there is any excess manufacturing capacity - but there is only very limited excess manufacturing capacity. And as i wrote few times before - "expanding capacity" is not a overnight thing, not even few weeks thing, more like months/years thing.
brooksy 8th November 2011, 10:23 Quote
Ha Ha I just replaced the two1tb drives in my Nas with two 2tb ones. So I have four 1tb samsung hard drives, 4tb in my nas and three SSDs.
driftingphil 8th November 2011, 11:57 Quote
Can everyone tell me what there using this amount of storage for?

Is it the difference between a porn collection, and a porn collection! Lol

I only run 1 120gb SSD does me fine.
Krikkit 8th November 2011, 12:04 Quote
I have a pretty enormous collection of ripped DVD's/TV etc, 100GB reserved for music, about 500GB of installed games etc, it all adds up fairly quickly. I couldn't use a one-for-everything computer without at least a couple of TB of space now really.
Another_level 8th November 2011, 12:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
This would imply that there is any excess manufacturing capacity - but there is only very limited excess manufacturing capacity. And as i wrote few times before - "expanding capacity" is not a overnight thing, not even few weeks thing, more like months/years thing.

This is not true.

Seagate have always stated that they have the ability to increase capacity to 60 million units in Q4 2011 and 70 million units in Q1 2012 provided that there are no restraints on external component supplies. I think we will know more about the extent of the supply chains issues by December.
SpAceman 8th November 2011, 12:43 Quote
I asked my local retailer if they had any info on when to expect prices to come back down. They told me their magic 8 ball said they should be fine before the end of 2012, this was via their Facebook page. Somehow the response isn't reassuring.
PlayedStation 8th November 2011, 12:53 Quote
Yeah i guess with all the death, disease and destruction of homes as a result of the flooding, we should all be upset at spending extra cash on a HD.
faugusztin 8th November 2011, 13:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
This is not true.

Seagate have always stated that they have the ability to increase capacity to 60 million units in Q4 2011 and 70 million units in Q1 2012 provided that there are no restraints on external component supplies. I think we will know more about the extent of the supply chains issues by December.

And Seagate also stated that they have to decrease the production due exactly those constraints to 40m from 50m. :(.

And even if they would not have those constraints, those 10-20m hard drives will sure save us when we have 70 million hard drives missing.

PS: Original Q4 Seagate production estimate was 58m. 60m is so damn far from that number, right ?
Another_level 8th November 2011, 16:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
And Seagate also stated that they have to decrease the production due exactly those constraints to 40m from 50m.

Not quite true faugusztin , Seagate said that with the current constraints on external components supply then shipment would be between 41 to 45 million units.
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
PS: Original Q4 Seagate production estimate was 58m. 60m is so damn far from that number, right ?

These figures are no longer relevant.

Seagate and Western Digital gave worldwide estimates for demand for HDDs at 170m & 180m units respectively. But these estimates were based on old prices and with the new prices we are seeing for HDDs then the demand for them would decrease as most people would wait for the prices to come down or switch to better technologies such as SSDs. Also not forgetting thst the western world's economy is broadly flat and in turn reduce demand for HDDs.

Only the desparate or the foolish, perhaps both, would be happy to pay the current hard drives prices.
faugusztin 8th November 2011, 16:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
...

And again. You mix end user market (you & me) with majority of market. Apple, Dell, HP, Lenovo and others have fixed prices until the end of the year, if not for longer. And they take large majority of those hard drives, probably even more than there will be made in Q4. And those guys are not paying €200 for 2TB drive, but they still pay the 60€ price - because they have an agreement which says they have to sell it at that price. And i am sorry if you cannot understand that, but right now the hard drive manufacturers are mainly interested in guys who take millions of hard drives per month, not in the guys who take maybe 1-4 hard drives per year. Because me and you will say "oh well" and don't buy a hard drive, but if WDC/Seagate doesn't deliver then they will have to pay for not delivering according to the contract.

So sorry if you think that if you think hard drive manufacturers should try to handle situation better for me & you (very little part of the market) rather than fulfilling their agreements with the guys who are the majority of the market.

The majority of the market still has the old prices, maybe with a little increase. The reason why do you see high prices in retail market is because the manufacturers cannot supply the retail market as all their hard drives go to their main market - computer manufacturers.

Just think about it - computer sales in Q3/20112 were 91.8m according to Gartner. And that is of course the wordwide brand name guys, those numbers are not counting small local computer manufacturers. That means just the big guys eat up 50-54% of the originally predicted Q4 production of hard drives. And 83% of current prediction of Q4 hard drive production (110 millions of hard drives). So you, me and small computer manufacturers have the remaining 17% share (20 million hard drives) for our disposal. And you can bet twice who will buy up those 20 million hard drives plus the current stock for their needs. Not you and not me, but the smaller computer manufactures.

And any sane person now understands why the prices are at the current price level. But i don't expect you to understand that. For you there is nothing more than greedy shops & distributors. Because they are so damn greedy that instead of 80 million hard drives they will get only the quarter of supply (worldwide). And even from that supply, you can bet twice which market will get the majority. I give you a hint - it is not Asian, not Australian, not South American, not African and not European.
yassarikhan786 8th November 2011, 16:29 Quote
I got a WD Caviar black 2TB for £104. A 1TB black drive is over £100 now!!!!
Another_level 8th November 2011, 16:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
And again. You mix end user market (you & me) with majority of market. Apple, Dell, HP, Lenovo and others have fixed prices until the end of the year, if not for longer. And they take large majority of those hard drives, probably even more than there will be made in Q4. And those guys are not paying €200 for 2TB drive, but they still pay the 60€ price - because they have an agreement which says they have to sell it at that price. And i am sorry if you cannot understand that, but right now the hard drive manufacturers are mainly interested in guys who take millions of hard drives per month, not in the guys who take maybe 1-4 hard drives per year. Because me and you will say "oh well" and don't buy a hard drive, but if WDC/Seagate doesn't deliver then they will have to pay for not delivering according to the contract.

So sorry if you think that if you think hard drive manufacturers should try to handle situation better for me & you (very little part of the market) rather than fulfilling their agreements with the guys who are the majority of the market.

The majority of the market still has the old prices, maybe with a little increase. The reason why do you see high prices in retail market is because the manufacturers cannot supply the retail market as all their hard drives go to their main market - computer manufacturers.

Just think about it - computer sales in Q3/20112 were 91.8m according to Gartner. And that is of course the wordwide brand name guys, those numbers are not counting small local computer manufacturers. That means just the big guys eat up 50-54% of the originally predicted Q4 production of hard drives. And 83% of current prediction of Q4 hard drive production (110 millions of hard drives). So you, me and small computer manufacturers have the remaining 17% share (20 million hard drives) for our disposal. And you can bet twice who will buy up those 20 million hard drives plus the current stock for their needs. Not you and not me, but the smaller computer manufactures.

And any sane person now understands why the prices are at the current price level. But i don't expect you to understand that. For you there is nothing more than greedy shops & distributors. Because they are so damn greedy that instead of 80 million hard drives they will get only the quarter of supply (worldwide). And even from that supply, you can bet twice which market will get the majority. I give you a hint - it is not Asian, not Australian, not South American, not African and not European.

Sorry if I don't treat your words as facts considering in previous posts you've given incorrect figures and change the goalpost whenever the argument doesn't suits you.

There are plenty of nutters in the business world and for this reason alone I like to make my own judgements as a consumer rather than relying on a dishonest person on a forum. :D

Fortunately, I'm heartened by people on this forum who recognises that big businesses can be idiots at times.
Guinevere 8th November 2011, 21:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
So if ocuk/scan/novatech/ebuyer/aria/yoyo and many others all stopped selling hd's from now and did not sell any for the next 3 months.You think they will just look at us and say "oh well you mean nothing to use

No I think they'd say...

"We're selling less drives than in 2010, but that's the price and market for you, and as we only make a few quid on each one it's not hurting us too much and we're still selling drives to small companies who have no choice as their regular supplier is out of stock and their email server went down on Sunday - Lolz!. And look at the budget SSDs we're selling in their place, and tablets is where the money is at these days anyway."

Believing an internet boycott of a few UK suppliers and one small product range can make a difference to the price the manufacturers charge said suppliers is fine bit of youthful idealism. You keep that glass half full thinking cap on - but be prepared to have it knocked off and stamped on by the cold hard boot of international trade.

Then again.... maybe it would get Scan worried...

Scan: Dear Mr Samsung, we're not selling any spin-points, the interweb says the price is too high. Can we have them at 2010 prices please?

Mr Samsung: No.

Scan: Sorry?

Mr Samsung: I said no

Scan: Please...

Mr Samsung: No

Scan: We'll order a double month supply.. say 1000 units?

Mr Samsung: (Mutters) We sell that many to Google every two seconds...

Scan: And we'll stop stocking Samsung if you don't lower the price...

Mr Samsung: That's okay.

Scan: What?

Mr Samsung: That's your choice, we'd rather you didn't but we're okay with your choice, the prices will come back down again when we get production back up again.

Scan: You don't care?

Mr Samsung: We like you as a customer, you're small and cute and have those funny English accents like on Benny Hill and Faulty Towers. But your sales equate to 0.00000000000001% of our global income and 0.00000000000000000000001% of our global profit, plus my brother and his son drowned in the floods and his widow is working eighteen hours days and as her village is still underwater she's living in a tent...

Scan (Feeling very small): Oh feck.
Another_level 8th November 2011, 22:24 Quote
What a stupid analogy.

None of the Samsung's hard drives manufacturing plants have been flooded.
sitech71 8th November 2011, 23:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
What a stupid analogy.

None of the Samsung's hard drives manufacturing plants have been flooded.

Thank you "another_level"
If the people of the libya had the attitude of Guinevere then where would they be.
Well they would be bowing down to their master.
Like I said sheep follow....
Wake up an be counted.. What are you a robot?"I will obey"
Sloth 8th November 2011, 23:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
Thank you "another_level"
If the people of the libya had the attitude of Guinevere then where would they be.
Well they would be bowing down to their master.
Like I said sheep follow....
Wake up an be counted.. What are you a robot?"I will obey"
The price has gone up so people buying them are sheep? I'll delete all of my ripped movies before I buy a hard drive at today's prices but that doesn't mean anyone who is still willing to pay is somehow inferior.

I love this mentality. You can't afford it so everyone else who can is a follower. You aren't the CEO of a big business so these highly successful people must surely be idiots. I'm sure all of your failings in life are the direct result of "the man" keeping you down.
sitech71 8th November 2011, 23:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth
The price has gone up so people buying them are sheep? I'll delete all of my ripped movies before I buy a hard drive at today's prices but that doesn't mean anyone who is still willing to pay is somehow inferior.

I love this mentality. You can't afford it so everyone else who can is a follower. You aren't the CEO of a big business so these highly successful people must surely be idiots. I'm sure all of your failings in life are the direct result of "the man" keeping you down.

You have missed the point by a mile.Did you read my first post?
Its about not getting ripped off. As I said a pc retailer I know had over 50 of the segate xt500 in stock and now have the same 50 instock. But with a price of £279.99. Same stock no flooding in their w-house!
If you accept everything in this world as it is you will never change things.We will just keeop gettign mugged off and taken for fools.
By the way Iam the CEO! I just have a different outlook than most.
Sloth 8th November 2011, 23:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitech71
You have missed the point by a mile.Did you read my first post?
Its about not getting ripped off. As I said a pc retailer I know had over 50 of the segate xt500 in stock and now have the same 50 instock. But with a price of £279.99. Same stock no flooding in their w-house!
If you accept everything in this world as it is you will never change things.We will just keeop gettign mugged off and taken for fools.
By the way Iam the CEO! I just have a different outlook than most.
And? They now know that they can get more money for those same drives and raised the price because other retailers have been hit with shortages and now desperate customers will come to them willing to pay £279.99. Some people's needs justify the extreme costs. Those who aren't willing to pay those costs don't have to. Hard drives are a luxury item, people without the cash will live without them. Yeah, it sucks being in the group that isn't willing to pay. I'd really like to buy a pair of 2TB drives right now but can't justify it. But complaining about it doesn't suddenly make Newegg (my retailer of choice) bend over backwards and slash the prices.
faugusztin 8th November 2011, 23:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
None of the Samsung's hard drives manufacturing plants have been flooded.

So when Mr. Apple, Mr. Acer, Mr. ASUS, Mr. Dell, Mr. HP, Mr. Toshiba, Mr. Sony or Mr. Toshiba comes to Mr. Samsung and ask for extra hard drives because Mr. Western Digital for some reason cannot deliver enough hard drives, Mr. Samsung will say "No! I need to sell to retail market. You and your pity million size orders are not important to me! Go away!". Then Mr. Scan comes and asks "Hey Mr. Samsung, i need to have our original 500 drive weekly order instead of the last delivery of 150 drives. Can you do that?". And Mr. Samsung says "Sure, no problem, just kicked out Mr. Big Computer Manufacturer out of my office, i don't care for their million size order, i want to sell it to you, small guys".

This is how your logic works Another_level ?
Another_level 8th November 2011, 23:43 Quote
I think Sloth has missed the point completely.

Using Sloth's logic, he must think eating McDonalds Big Mac must be healthy because the company is big and successful.

Thanks for your kind words Sitech and I share your outlook too.
Sloth 8th November 2011, 23:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
So when Mr. Apple, Mr. Acer, Mr. ASUS, Mr. Dell, Mr. HP, Mr. Toshiba, Mr. Sony or Mr. Toshiba comes to Mr. Samsung and ask for extra hard drives because Mr. Western Digital for some reason cannot deliver enough hard drives, Mr. Samsung will say "No! I need to sell to retail market. You and your pity million size orders are not important to me! Go away!". Then Mr. Scan comes and asks "Hey Mr. Samsung, i need to have our original 500 drive weekly order instead of the last delivery of 150 drives. Can you do that?". And Mr. Samsung says "Sure, no problem, just kicked out Mr. Big Computer Manufacturer out of my office, i don't care for their million size order, i want to sell it to you, small guys".

This is how your logic works Another_level ?
Oh but of course that's how it should work! That's what's nice for me, and that's what matters! Anything that makes life difficult for me is greedy and evil and bad.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
I think Sloth has missed the point completely.

Using Sloth's logic, he must think eating McDonalds Big Mac must be healthy because the company is big and successful.

Thanks for your kind words Sitech and I share your outlook too.
Big Macs aren't healthy, they also taste bad (all that sauce and lettuce and tomato) and as such I don't eat them. However, I also don't go around calling people fools or sheep for eating them. They want to eat unhealthy food and line McDonald's pockets? Go for it. Have a blast! Likewise, retailers want to overprice hard drives and people still want to buy them? Their money, not mine.
Another_level 8th November 2011, 23:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
So when Mr. Apple, Mr. Acer, Mr. ASUS, Mr. Dell, Mr. HP, Mr. Toshiba, Mr. Sony or Mr. Toshiba comes to Mr. Samsung and ask for extra hard drives because Mr. Western Digital for some reason cannot deliver enough hard drives, Mr. Samsung will say "No! I need to sell to retail market. You and your pity million size orders are not important to me! Go away!". Then Mr. Scan comes and asks "Hey Mr. Samsung, i need to have our original 500 drive weekly order instead of the last delivery of 150 drives. Can you do that?". And Mr. Samsung says "Sure, no problem, just kicked out Mr. Big Computer Manufacturer out of my office, i don't care for their million size order, i want to sell it to you, small guys".

This is how your logic works Another_level ?

Actually Mr Samsung would say he sold his hard drives business to Seagate. Better ask Seagate for drives.

Jeez, you don't seem to know your industry very well, faugusztin.
Sloth 9th November 2011, 00:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another_level
Actually Mr Samsung would say he sold his hard drives business to Seagate. Better ask Seagate for drives.

Jeez, you don't seem to know your industry very well, faugusztin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
So when Mr. Apple, Mr. Acer, Mr. ASUS, Mr. Dell, Mr. HP, Mr. Toshiba, Mr. Sony or Mr. Toshiba comes to Mr. Seagate and ask for extra hard drives because Mr. Western Digital for some reason cannot deliver enough hard drives, Mr. Seagate will say "No! I need to sell to retail market. You and your pity million size orders are not important to me! Go away!". Then Mr. Scan comes and asks "Hey Mr. Seagate, i need to have our original 500 drive weekly order instead of the last delivery of 150 drives. Can you do that?". And Mr. Seagate says "Sure, no problem, just kicked out Mr. Big Computer Manufacturer out of my office, i don't care for their million size order, i want to sell it to you, small guys".

This is how your logic works Another_level ?
Another_level 9th November 2011, 00:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sloth
Likewise, retailers want to overprice hard drives and people still want to buy them? Their money, not mine.

I'm afraid I don't share your outlook. If you look at the bankers they have a herd mentality which caused havoc to the western economy.

I've quoted your last point, Sloth, as I think people are not willing to pay inflated prices for hard drives and as Sitech has said Scan stocks of hard drives have remained static recently.

BTW Sloth changing Mr Samsung to Mr Seagate in your last post has made you look foolish.
faugusztin 9th November 2011, 01:30 Quote
No, he changed it because you are grabbing on semantics and not the meaning of the post. Point is, you and me are the last in the line, the whole retail chain gets much less drives, period. Whatever you post will not change that, it also won't change retail pricing.

But i guess you would rather have the "delivery time 4 to 8 months*" and original prices, so when someones drive fail, they won't have even the expensive option to replace it.

*optimistic estimate.
Another_level 9th November 2011, 02:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
<snip> Point is, you and me are the last in the line, the whole retail chain gets much less drives, period. Whatever you post will not change that, it also won't change retail pricing.

But i guess you would rather have the "delivery time 4 to 8 months*" and original prices, so when someones drive fail, they won't have even the expensive option to replace it.

*optimistic estimate.

Well I have SSD so happy to wait eternity until the hard drives prices drop. In the meantime I'm happy to give my personal opinion where I see fit.

I think in 2012, Seagate will dominate the HDD market for at least two quarters possibly more while Western Digital struggles to regain its market share. There should be enough HDDs supplies to meet demand in q1 2012 and so prices should return to normal.

Also, have Western Digital expanded their operations to Malaysia as part of their $1.2b investment to last five years? Manufacturing and R&D facilities were meant to be completed by 3rd quarter this year.

History have shown when individuals stand up for their beliefs then change can happen.
Shielder 9th November 2011, 13:09 Quote
Did you miss this on El Reg?

WD ceasing production for 6 months and Seagate having issues.

Looks like my RAID array will have to wait for a good long while :(

Like others have said, we, the great unwashed public, are at the bottom of the food chain when it comes to HDD supply. So any dregs that come through the channel will cost more. If your 1TB Spinpoint or SDD boot drive fails, are you just going to refuse to buy a hard drive and be without your computer/data until the price drops to what you think you should pay?

No, I didn't think so.

Andy
Another_level 9th November 2011, 14:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shielder
Did you miss this on El Reg?

WD ceasing production for 6 months and Seagate having issues.

Looks like my RAID array will have to wait for a good long while :(

Like others have said, we, the great unwashed public, are at the bottom of the food chain when it comes to HDD supply. So any dregs that come through the channel will cost more. If your 1TB Spinpoint or SDD boot drive fails, are you just going to refuse to buy a hard drive and be without your computer/data until the price drops to what you think you should pay?

No, I didn't think so.

Andy

You can't really take that article as fact because some analyst gave speculative opinions to a journalist about the floods in Thailand affecting hard drives productions. Good food for thoughts but not facts I'm afraid.

And in answer to your final question I've always stated that the desparates or complete idiots with more money than sense, perhaps both, would be happy to pay the current inflated prices for hard drives.
Shielder 9th November 2011, 14:28 Quote
So what will you do if your SSD fails?

Andy
Jqim 9th November 2011, 15:41 Quote
I hate the way everyone feels they have the right to demand things like lower prices and more stuff. You are not owed anything. Its not like your being denied fresh water or other human rights. This whole self centered 'customer is king' way of thinking is deeply flawed because you are NOT special you are not importaint and certianly not king. You want a hard disk pay for one, dont want to pay then start your own hard disk factory and see how much money you save.
littlepuppi 9th November 2011, 18:14 Quote
People have got too used to super cheap storage that they now see the previous prices as "the" price. Same will happen in memory markets - players will leave due to super tight margins - then the remaining players that have toughed it out will raise prices, expect Hitachi seagate and Western Digital to do the same, 2TB drive for £100 - is that really that bad?
Another_level 9th November 2011, 18:41 Quote
Sorry guys, you might as well talk to me in a foreign language as I clearly don't follow Sheep's logic.

Now guys, why don't you sing baa, baa black Sheep?
thehippoz 9th November 2011, 18:56 Quote
wow I missed all this drama.. *gets popcorn and waits for sloth*

I don't really care one way or the other.. if I need a drive, what are your gonna do.. have to buy one

maybe fix it with spare parts at best.. wonder if this will start a market for used drives

porn box drives maybe
Fizzban 9th November 2011, 20:04 Quote
Thankfully I don't need a new HD yet, but I was hoping to get one some time next year. I will watch prices carefully I feel. And OOOOO Drama. See I miss this when I take a break from bit. ;)
mediapcAddict 10th November 2011, 02:35 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by driftingphil
Can everyone tell me what there using this amount of storage for?
Video and drive images

An HD mediapc for television recording can quickly make a 2TB drive look small.
( read my user name and trust that I am speaking from experience )
The_Beast 10th November 2011, 03:02 Quote
I'm sure that my computers value as at least doubled since this tragic accident


Hopefully I should be set for a while. If not to optical media I go (never thought I'd say that)
tonyd223 10th November 2011, 16:31 Quote
kinda glad my HAF 922's got lots of hard drive bays - I can resurrect all the old drives I have lying around and get them raided...

I have ignored raid for Samsung F3 1TB drives as it's just so much less complex...
Ajhayter 10th November 2011, 16:55 Quote
I would just point out that some UK retailers have priced their hard drives very high in order to try to reduce demand. My employer has put prices up as well as imposed a 1 hard driver per order limit.

It's not because we want to fleece customers for money, it's because we need to keep enough hard drives to supply customers. Customers that include business clients, as well as our own pre-built machines. If that means some customers don't buy due to the price, then that is regrettable, as it is for the customers who actually NEED a hard drive (as opposed to just want), but can you imagine what would happen if we didn't?

Say we sold hard drives at old levels for a month. Other retailers prices are on the rise, so customers flood to us for the cheaper drives. We get a nice chunk of money from that sure, but then we have none/very little hard drive stock, with no expected re-supply in any kind of volume. This causes our entire business to grind to a halt. We can't support corporate and enterprise customers, we can't build PC's to sell to consumers, and we won't have any drives to sell to customers that really need it. More importantly we loose the trust of people who rely on us to supply them.

So keep going on about "lol sheep" if you want. It's not for the sake of profit. There are serious ramifications for retailers if they don't maintain stocks of hard drives.
faugusztin 10th November 2011, 17:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Beast
I'm sure that my computers value as at least doubled since this tragic accident

/me looks at 6xWD20EARS+4xWD20EARX, checks local prices (190e for both types), puts the number in calculator, result is 1900e, /me faints :D

Edit: Fixed the 2nd hard drive type.
The_Beast 10th November 2011, 20:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by faugusztin
/me looks at 6xWD20EARS+4xWDEADS, checks local prices (190e for both types), puts the number in calculator, result is 1900e, /me faints :D

When I have the time I'll post what I paid and what they are worth today.
faugusztin 10th November 2011, 21:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Beast
When I have the time I'll post what I paid and what they are worth today.

I paid 300 for 4xWD20EARX, 300 for 2xWD20EARS (year and half ago) and i'm pretty sure the remainig 4 were around 100 per piece. That is ~1000€ in total. So the value pretty much doubled :D.
DC74 11th November 2011, 05:54 Quote
And this is a good reason that we should have some HDD factories in Europe somewhere, preferably somewhere above sea level. The monsoon and tropical storms are a fact of life in the far east, they are annual events, are we as consumers going to have a knife held at our throats everytime nature decides to do what she does and by chance hits a country that supplies computer electronics? If so then perhaps the HDD manufacturers should consider relocating some of their factories to another drier part of the world.

It makes no sense at all to keep all your eggs in one basket, it harms your business and the businesses of the people you supply with your finished product.
Shielder 11th November 2011, 13:51 Quote
Yeah, but how much would the staff wages be? H&S legislation, taxes etc etc?

Thailand has cheap labour and I'm sure that none of the H&S legislation is anywhere near as stringent as ours is!

Andy
DC74 12th November 2011, 23:01 Quote
Yeah but least we have plenty of high ground and know how to deal with water, afterall we're an island. Besides the factory need not be located in the UK, there's plenty of countries in Europe sitting way above sea level and they don't hit businesses with half the crap that they do here in the UK. Just locating a factory or two here in Europe, could prevent the starvation the industry is suffering as a result of the Thailand floods.
faugusztin 12th November 2011, 23:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC74
Yeah but least we have plenty of high ground and know how to deal with water, afterall we're an island. Besides the factory need not be located in the UK, there's plenty of countries in Europe sitting way above sea level and they don't hit businesses with half the crap that they do here in the UK. Just locating a factory or two here in Europe, could prevent the starvation the industry is suffering as a result of the Thailand floods.

So, where in Europe exactly do you plan this. I guess you want it in EU, then your options are rather limited. Even in the least paid countries, you will have to give the workers ~300e as a minimal monthly salary. Which is i guess much much more than the guys at Thailand get. Unless of course you wish to pay a lot more for hard drives. Oh wait, that is now :). Prices you see now are probably the prices you would see for European-made hard drive due workforce costs.
Lazarus Dark 14th November 2011, 03:00 Quote
Ouuuch.
I'm about to fill my 5tb's and was planning on getting a nas with another 5-6tb. That's definately not happening now, not for a couple years it sounds.
Guess I should start some cleaning... stick some old stuff on dvd-r (I have a whole stack of 50 just sitting around)
Noob? 14th November 2011, 13:19 Quote
Just when I needed to order a new build, HDD price will take a big chunk out the budget for it.

Shame.
faugusztin 17th November 2011, 12:32 Quote
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-11-17/seagate-s-luczo-raises-prices-while-bracing-for-worst-in-thai-floods-tech.html

I start to feel lucky for getting four WD20EARX drives few weeks before the price increase for 75€ each :).
Sloth 17th November 2011, 20:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Beast

Hopefully I should be set for a while. If not to optical media I go (never thought I'd say that)
Looking at the price of Blurays they don't seem so bad anymore as a storage media. ~600GB for $25 if you've got access to a burner.

I'm lucky enough to know someone who's laptop can burn BRs, worst case scenario this is my plan.
Tribble 22nd November 2011, 15:33 Quote
Looks around i have alot of spare drives, any failed drives will be replaced under warranty from now on, it not be that bad.
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