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GameStation: "We own your soul"

GameStation: "We own your soul"

In a bid to prove that nobody reads the T&Cs of an online sale, GameStation added a new clause of their own...

GameStation has today revealed that it legally owns the souls of thousands of customers, thanks to a clause it secretly added to the online terms and conditions for the official GameStation website.

The "Immortal Soul Clause" was added as part of an attempt to highlight how few customers read the terms and conditions of an online sale. GameStation claims that 88 percent of customers did not read the clause, which gives legal ownership of the customer's soul over to the UK-based games retailer.

The remaining 12 percent of customers however did notice the clause and clicked the relevant opt-out box, netting themselves a £5 GBP gift voucher in the process.

GameStation executives are now assuring all customers that they are not enforcing the Immortal Soul Clause and will be contacting customers via email with a notice of nullification - phew!

According to News:Lite more than 7,500 customers fell for the simple ploy and missed out on the gift voucher.

The clause was added to GameStation's standard T&Cs on April 1st.

How much would you sell your soul for? Let us know in the forums.

40 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
yakyb 15th April 2010, 12:19 Quote
umm could i not sue them for this

if my belief is that we have a soul (which it isn't)
yakyb 15th April 2010, 12:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
umm could i not sue them for this

if my belief is that we have a soul (which it isn't)

Oh on that note any one want it? 10 grand?
rickysio 15th April 2010, 12:33 Quote
I'd sell it for a Core i9000 if I can have it (and relevant hardware) right now.
whisperwolf 15th April 2010, 12:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
umm could i not sue them for this

if my belief is that we have a soul (which it isn't)

what would you sue them for? Realsing that customers don't read terms and conditions. I'd be invoking the term and offering people their souls back in exchange for a years work at the store, I mean that must be how they got the current staff to work for them isn't it.
Unknownsock 15th April 2010, 12:44 Quote
This is...awesome
leveller 15th April 2010, 12:45 Quote
"GameStation executives are now assuring all customers that they are not enforcing the Immortal Soul Clause"

... not enforcing the clause ... yet!
[USRF]Obiwan 15th April 2010, 12:46 Quote
Nobody reads them because its a lot of blablabla which normal people do not understand anyway. Besides that, it is for the protection of the company not for protecting the people using their products.
Fizzban 15th April 2010, 12:54 Quote
That is just ******* brilliant!
LeMaltor 15th April 2010, 13:03 Quote
It's just babble, well done to everyone who didn't waste their time reading it.
wiak 15th April 2010, 13:03 Quote
april fools you gotta love some stores :D
terms and conditions is so long nobody wanna read 100 pages, make it 1 page then meybe or just do like HashTab's License Agreement :P
http://beeblebrox.org/
lacuna 15th April 2010, 13:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeMaltor
It's just babble, well done to everyone who didn't waste their time reading it.


yeah, they did really well to miss out on the voucher...
tron 15th April 2010, 13:28 Quote
If I had seen the clause, i probably would still have clicked 'yes', as the clause relates to something which imo, along with gods and wizards, doesn't even exist.
Veles 15th April 2010, 13:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
umm could i not sue them for this

if my belief is that we have a soul (which it isn't)

Don't think so, you agreed to the T&Cs and it wasn't hidden anywhere
eddtox 15th April 2010, 13:43 Quote
This is just a (very good) publicity stunt to attract attention to the fact that people don't read the TC's. I doubt they ever had any intention of enforcing the clause seeing as the existence of said immortal soul is debatable and if it did exist it would probably an illegal clause.

In plain engrish, if instead of "immortal soul" they had said "car", they still wouldn't legally be able to enforce that clause, IMO.
Fizzl 15th April 2010, 14:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tron
Wizards don't even exist

Lies! You take that back right now!! :P
xaser04 15th April 2010, 15:20 Quote
If terms an conditions were written in plain english and were the length of a decent novel more people would probably take the time to read them. Until then most people will simply ignore them assuming simple common sense would prevail if there was a problem.
rickysio 15th April 2010, 16:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaser04
If terms an conditions were written in plain english and were the length of a decent novel more people would probably take the time to read them. Until then most people will simply ignore them assuming simple common sense would prevail if there was a problem.

How many people actually possess a modicum of common sense?
Fizzban 15th April 2010, 16:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzl
Lies! You take that back right now!! :P

I like your name
greigaitken 15th April 2010, 17:23 Quote
^^
i sense a forum romance starting
NuTech 15th April 2010, 17:45 Quote
People generally don't read T&Cs when shopping online anyway. Besides, customer protection laws usually void most of the bullshit they put in them.

But yes, it's a good publicity stunt.
xaser04 15th April 2010, 17:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickysio
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaser04
If terms an conditions were written in plain english and were the length of a decent novel more people would probably take the time to read them. Until then most people will simply ignore them assuming simple common sense would prevail if there was a problem.

How many people actually possess a modicum of common sense?

Well this is part of the problem with society today (but thats a different thread).
Farfalho 15th April 2010, 17:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzl
Quote:
Originally Posted by tron
Wizards don't even exist

Lies! You take that back right now!! :P

I laughed so hard at this :D omg, brilliant
Waynio 15th April 2010, 18:10 Quote
Had to comment, made me lol :D.
Wicked april fools lmao :D, people who opted out given £5 voucher :D.
But to be honest some terms from too many places are way over the top & would take hours to read through, all terms & conditions could surely be slimmed down some to save customers some time, all to often it's a pile of blah blah blah, I always try to speed through checking the first line of each part & if it doesn't seem relevant I skip to the next bit.
LucusLoC 15th April 2010, 18:45 Quote
there needs to be a way to convey the gist of the legalese in far few words. most of the TaC that i read through simply amount to

1. don't copy the software without permission
2. don't use the software without a license
3. we are not responsible for damages cause by this software
4. we are not responsible if the software does not work as advertised
5. we are not responsible to show you how to use the software
6. all other unnamed risks and liabilities are assumed by you
7. don't sue us

throw in a bunch of clarifications of what "this software" is and what "your stuff" is and which parties are who ("the company" etc.) and you basically have a 10 to 20 page standard TaC. some companies throw in things like agreeing to buy all support for said software from them, or put in an all sales final and nonrefundable clause, but as said by a few others, most of those tend to be unenforceable due to consumer protection laws. then there are all the trademark clauses, which are irrelevant to pretty much anyone since they are typically registered and protected already, but are put in anyway for some reason i do not understand. . .

what we really need is a legal standard for summarizing legal documents. . . .
Anfield 15th April 2010, 18:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by xaser04
If terms an conditions were written in plain english and were the length of a decent novel more people would probably take the time to read them. Until then most people will simply ignore them assuming simple common sense would prevail if there was a problem.

Where do you go to if you actually find something you disagree with in some Terms and Conditions? lets say you want a new mobile phone contract and read the Terms and Conditions of a O2 contract, find something you disagree with, what options do you have? go to the competition? oh wait, they have terms and conditions too and they may look different because they where written by a different lawyer, but when it comes down to it they all mean the same anyway, you give up any rights you may would have and give them the right to do whatever they want.
Point is simple, you have to sign the terms and conditions anyway or you can't have anything, no roof over your head, no transportation, no computer, no nothing. So what is the point of them being understandable or reading them? You know that you are signing away all your rights to start with, no need to read or understand them.
Psytek 15th April 2010, 18:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tron
If I had seen the clause, i probably would still have clicked 'yes', as the clause relates to something which imo, along with gods and wizards, doesn't even exist.

What a stupid thing to say!

Everyone knows wizards are real.
Shagbag 15th April 2010, 19:21 Quote
This is pathetic, not because it perpetuates the false belief that everything in a EULA is somehow legally binding, but because they somehow think you've missed out by failing to claim the £5 voucher.
What exactly can I buy from Gamestation that will cost no more than £5 incl. p&p? I'd hazard a guess at nothing. I can buy nothing from Gamestation for £5 incl. p&p. O NOES! I missed out on this amazing offer!
The 'stunt' is no more than an insult to the intelligence.
whisperwolf 15th April 2010, 19:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagbag
This is pathetic, not because it perpetuates the false belief that everything in a EULA is somehow legally binding, but because they somehow think you've missed out by failing to claim the £5 voucher.
What exactly can I buy from Gamestation that will cost no more than £5 incl. p&p? I'd hazard a guess at nothing. I can buy nothing from Gamestation for £5 incl. p&p. O NOES! I missed out on this amazing offer!
The 'stunt' is no more than an insult to the intelligence.

Erm little thing, this isn't a EULA, it's a shopping sites terms of sale, not a license agreement to buy from them.
Locknload 15th April 2010, 20:51 Quote
HAHA.......is that just what EA and -Activision have been trying to do for years
spoonz
Sloth 15th April 2010, 21:29 Quote
Normally having to check off for an additional clause should sound some alarms. It may be hard to read Legalese but at least a slight brush over should alert you when words like "immortal" and "soul" come up. It's a good lesson to teach people, don't just take things for granted. Very well done by GameStation!
Kamanashi 15th April 2010, 22:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakyb
umm could i not sue them for this

if my belief is that we have a soul (which it isn't)
Yes, but you would lose and be charge a court cost. Plus, it's not like they did anything wrong. Some people may not believe a law is alright, but that doesn't mean they can sue and win for someone enforcing it. Think or it that way.
Aracos 16th April 2010, 00:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagbag
This is pathetic, not because it perpetuates the false belief that everything in a EULA is somehow legally binding, but because they somehow think you've missed out by failing to claim the £5 voucher.
What exactly can I buy from Gamestation that will cost no more than £5 incl. p&p? I'd hazard a guess at nothing. I can buy nothing from Gamestation for £5 incl. p&p. O NOES! I missed out on this amazing offer!
The 'stunt' is no more than an insult to the intelligence.

I bought Blue Dragon on the 360 for £4.99 on the gamestation website a couple of months ago, no postage and packing.
ssj12 16th April 2010, 00:17 Quote
that is bloody brilliant! totally support what they did.
WestHej 16th April 2010, 12:22 Quote
:),

good job to whoever got the vouchers!
Dreaming 17th April 2010, 15:18 Quote
Legally speaking, you have to give 'proper notice' of any unusual terms or conditions or exclusions in a contract. It would be normal to buy a game and be expected not to pirate it, for example. But anything else that you would not normally assume you have to draw proper attention to, either by having it in bold or in a prominent place.

The same goes for example in a car park if their T&C exclude liability for any injury you get whilst in the car park, that is not really normal - yes exclude liability for theft but personal injury? If I go into a shop and slip over on some water I would normally expect them to be responsible for that. So they would need to put a proper notice by the ticket machine and/or entrance to say "NO LIABILITY WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR ANY PERSONAL INJURY ON THESE PREMISES".

So really, it's just a bit of fun, but doesn't mean anything at all. PC Gamer did something similar many years ago for their demo CD, saying if you wanted to use it you transferred possession of your home to them. Of course nobody read it :p
Pieface 17th April 2010, 15:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagbag
This is pathetic, not because it perpetuates the false belief that everything in a EULA is somehow legally binding, but because they somehow think you've missed out by failing to claim the £5 voucher.
What exactly can I buy from Gamestation that will cost no more than £5 incl. p&p? I'd hazard a guess at nothing. I can buy nothing from Gamestation for £5 incl. p&p. O NOES! I missed out on this amazing offer!
The 'stunt' is no more than an insult to the intelligence.

This guy obviously lost his soul and isn't happy.
Kiytan 26th April 2010, 14:03 Quote
hehe, that's pretty funny.

Nice to see somebody somewhere in that company still has a sense of humour
jrep 27th April 2010, 23:14 Quote
I might just part with my immortal soul in exchange for someone taking this experimental result to court and getting rid of all those inane click-throughs!
Bayaz 20th May 2010, 12:05 Quote
This reminds of the Simpsons episode where Bart sells his soul to Milhouse
Ending Credits 20th May 2010, 13:05 Quote
In my experience if there's anything worth reading in these things it's generally right at the top and in big bold letters which is how it should be.
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