bit-tech.net

Justin Rattner steps down as Intel CTO

Justin Rattner steps down as Intel CTO

Intel's Justin Rattner, an employee since 1973, is to step down from his role as chief executive having reached the cut-off age for corporate officers.

Intel's Justin Rattner is to step down as chief technical officer, having fallen foul of an age-related by-law that requires all corporate officers to be aged under 65.

Rattner joined Intel in 1973, became its first principal engineer in 1979, the fourth Intel Fellow in 1988 and one of the first Intel Senior Fellows in 2001. Part of the regular crew Intel uses for its keynote speeches at the annual Intel Developer Forum (IDF) - having participated in more keynotes than any other Intel presenter - Rattner's plaudits include being named R&D Magazine's Scientist of the Year in 1989, ABC News' Person of the Week in 1996 and the Open Innovation Strategy and Policy Group Industry Luminary Award for 21st Century Industrial Innovation.

Rattner's name can also be found attached to four patents:a data processing system; a hardware scheduler/dispatcher for said data processing system; an interprocessor communication system, and a programmable I/O sequencer for use in an I/O processor. Since taking on a more managerial role, however, his work in this field has reduced, with the most recent of those patents dating back to 1989.

Rather than being a falling-out with any other staff member, Rattner's departure from the role comes as a result of his age: a by-law in Intel's charter states that no corporate officer may serve in his or her role past the age of 65, which Rattner has now reached. As a result, he is to step down with his division - Intel Labs - to report to Intel's president Renée James in the interim.

Rattner's departure is to occur immediately, with Intel claiming that a 'pressing family matter' means he is to take an unspecified amount of personal leave from the company. Following the matter's resolution, Rattner will return to Intel in a non-officer role, the details of which have yet to be decided.

The announcement comes just days after Rattner's Intel Labs division held its 11th annual Research@Intel event where twenty new technologies - including a system for using car's lights as a communications network to reduce automotive accidents, Shelf Edge Technology for personalising the shopping experience, the combination of public and personal data with context-aware algorithms to present only the most useful data to a user, and an Internet of Things (IoT)-themed system for adding sensing capabilities to inanimate objects around the house - were demonstrated to the world.

Thus far, Intel has not indicated who will succeed Rattner in the role of chief technical officer.

9 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
Snips 28th June 2013, 09:44 Quote
" including a system for using car's lights as a communications network to reduce automotive accidents"

That sounds really clever
Gareth Halfacree 28th June 2013, 10:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snips
" including a system for using car's lights as a communications network to reduce automotive accidents" That sounds really clever
There's a lot of work in this area going on at the moment - with possibly the most interesting being SARTRE: the Safe Road Trains for the Environment project. Stick a bunch of cars behind a professionally-driven lorry, have the lorry take control and the people behind can let go of the wheel. As the lorry accelerates, decelerates or steers, the information is passed to the car behind - which passes it to the car behind, which passes it to the car behind, which passes it to the car behind...

Neat stuff.
alialias 28th June 2013, 12:13 Quote
^That's pretty impressive!
Snips 28th June 2013, 14:54 Quote
Impressive indeed
Phil Rhodes 28th June 2013, 15:04 Quote
Age discrimination, anyone?
Eiffie 28th June 2013, 18:55 Quote
I think I remember seeing something about that traffic system with the lead car on a Modern Marvels special on TV a few years back, they were using it for industrial things and for large shipping trucks to transport big loads but using it for public transport is really neat. Having a car in the future where it can take you places without your input is quite something as long as there are safe-guards to help prevent accidents should the system fail at a bad time. I really hope more work is put into this!
Bede 29th June 2013, 18:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snips
" including a system for using car's lights as a communications network to reduce automotive accidents" That sounds really clever
There's a lot of work in this area going on at the moment - with possibly the most interesting being SARTRE: the Safe Road Trains for the Environment project. Stick a bunch of cars behind a professionally-driven lorry, have the lorry take control and the people behind can let go of the wheel. As the lorry accelerates, decelerates or steers, the information is passed to the car behind - which passes it to the car behind, which passes it to the car behind, which passes it to the car behind...

Neat stuff.

Except that most drivers don't fancy being stuck behind a lorry limited to 60mph. I do a 200m drive quite regularly, and having to stick at 60mph would add at least half an hour to my journey. The system itself is a great idea though.
Tyinsar 1st July 2013, 07:54 Quote
With all the spell checking options we have literally at our fingertips we seem to be worse than we ever were. How do you think the average person's driving will be?
Gareth Halfacree 1st July 2013, 08:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bede
Except that most drivers don't fancy being stuck behind a lorry limited to 60mph.
If it meant I could read a book or catch up on a bit of work, I'd be all for being limited to 60MPH - or less. Mind you, the system would have to be *seriously* robust before I'd be happy with the driver pulling out the latest page-turner and ignoring the road completely...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyinsar
With all the spell checking options we have literally at our fingertips we seem to be worse than we ever were. How do you think the average person's driving will be?
Interestingly enough, that's why aeroplane landings are often smoother in terrible visibility than in good visibility: we have automated systems in place in modern aircraft - the Instrument Landing System coupled to the Flight Control Computer - which can land a plane with 100 per cent success (let's face it, nobody's going to settle for 99.999% in this case!) every single time, but when the weather's good the pilots turn it off just so they can get practice with manual landings. When the visibility drops below a certain level, they're forced by law to use ILS - and thus you don't get that "bouncity-bounce-bounce" landing that is so telling of manual control.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums