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Free MP3s of every record you've ever bought with new Amazon Autorip

Free MP3s of every record you've ever bought with new Amazon Autorip

Amazon Cloud Player

Amazon has just announced a new service called Amazon Autorip that will provide free mp3 versions of every CD or vinyl you've bought through the shop.

The new service will automatically go all the way back to 1999 and check all your music purchases from the store, including cassettes, CDs and vinyl then automatically add the mp3 versions to your Amazon Cloud Player library.

As well as being available to play online through the Cloud Player, tracks are also downloadable using the Amazon mp3 downloader. Tracks bought through the service are DRM free so work on any normal mp3 player. The tracks are encoded at a perfectly acceptable 256Kbps.

“What would you say if you bought CDs, vinyl or even cassettes from a company 14 years ago, and then 14 years later that company licensed the rights from the record companies to give you the MP3 versions of those albums… and then to top it off, did that for you automatically and for free?” said Jeff Bezos, Amazon.com Founder and CEO.

Considering you could have long since lost the physical versions, frankly Mr Bezos, we'd say that's a very good deal.

Also revealed by the company today is its list of the top-ten best selling albums, which is topped by '21' then '19' by Adele. Although this is quite a remarkable feat, the list does have a strong skew towards modern music with only Amy Winehouse's Back to Black album being older than five years.

Will you be giving Amazon Autorip a go or are you shaking your head at having spent all your money with hmv/virgin/play/etc? Let us know in the comments.

41 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply
scott_chegg 27th June 2013, 09:45 Quote
Sweet. I've bought a few CD's from amazon over the years which arrived scratched and skipped on certain tracks. I never got round to returning them. Guess I can replace those with these in my Itunes library now.
Cei 27th June 2013, 10:28 Quote
Well that's useful. 510 songs added!
Tangster 27th June 2013, 10:33 Quote
Only took them nearly half a year to roll this out in the UK after the US launch.
Xir 27th June 2013, 10:37 Quote
Didn't even know they had a player...
Maybe they don't in Germany
mi1ez 27th June 2013, 10:37 Quote
Wow. All the gifts I've bought for people!
johnnyboy700 27th June 2013, 10:51 Quote
Wow, I'll take a look see at what I've got there.
Corky42 27th June 2013, 11:11 Quote
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?
scott_chegg 27th June 2013, 12:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?

Shhhhhhh! They'll hear you!
Alecto 27th June 2013, 12:45 Quote
I would say: thanks Jeff; too bad you didn't think of that years ago when I had to purchase replacements for some of my CDs because I misplaced the originals. I never listened to CDs themselves, I ripped them immediately after unboxing them and played the music in MP3 form from the harddrive.
Woodspoon 27th June 2013, 13:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?

You make an interesting and very good point.
Buy on Amazon then sell on ebay = free music
Phalanx 27th June 2013, 13:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?

Nope. The idea behind it is you are given a free extra licence for a digital copy. What you do with the physical media is your choice. It's not a backup; it's another copy.
Woodspoon 27th June 2013, 13:23 Quote
Just checked my Amazon account, it's not exactly as described here, lol
You get 250 songs stored free then you have to subscribe, but they do rip it for free and it does seem that only music brought directly from Amazon is applicable, music from the Amazon market place doesn't seem to be included.
Phalanx 27th June 2013, 13:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
Just checked my Amazon account, it's not exactly as described here, lol
You get 250 songs stored free then you have to subscribe, but they do rip it for free and it does seem that only music brought directly from Amazon is applicable, music from the Amazon market place doesn't seem to be included.

No, that's 250 songs imported free. You can store every purchase you make with them. That's how my account works.
pbryanw 27th June 2013, 13:55 Quote
I'm not sure if this is clear from the article, but this only applies to CDs sold by Amazon, not by 3rd Parties selling through Amazon. Just thought it was worth saying, as I've bought a couple of CDs through Amazon over the years, but was disappointed that only two qualify for Autorip.
Woodspoon 27th June 2013, 14:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phalanx


No, that's 250 songs imported free. You can store every purchase you make with them. That's how my account works.

Oh yes 250 imported songs free, my bad and 5gb of storage.
250 isn't all that much though really is it and the article kind of implies that it's all free.
compared to something like Google music it's not all that really.
longweight 27th June 2013, 14:20 Quote
How many times can I download the songs?
Phalanx 27th June 2013, 14:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
Oh yes 250 imported songs free, my bad and 5gb of storage.
250 isn't all that much though really is it and the article kind of implies that it's all free.
compared to something like Google music it's not all that really.

Every purchase you make from Amazon is stored there. No limit. You can also import 250 songs free from your own collection.

The 5GB of storage is Amazon Cloud Drive, a separate thing, and doesn't count towards your Cloud Player storage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by longweight
How many times can I download the songs?

As many times as you like. You don't even have to download them. I'm listening to my collection at work as we speak, as I do every day, and I haven't downloaded them once. It can stream them for you.
schmidtbag 27th June 2013, 14:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?

Seems like you and I are on a think-alike streak lately.
Doctor Hades 27th June 2013, 15:09 Quote
Well that's useful. 910 songs added to my library from CDs I've bought from Amazon over the years. Very nice!
gagaga 27th June 2013, 15:29 Quote
Cloud player is awesome, even if it does now have my mother's copies of Lionel Ritchie and Ronan Keating in it ...
Gareth Halfacree 27th June 2013, 15:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by gagaga
Cloud player is awesome, even if it does now have my mother's copies of Lionel Ritchie and Ronan Keating in it ...
I bought one - *one* - cricket-related book as a gift, and for *years* Amazon kept recommending others to me in place of products I might actually want. The relief I felt when they added the option to manually tune the recommendation engine...
Woodspoon 27th June 2013, 15:40 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phalanx


Every purchase you make from Amazon is stored there. No limit. You can also import 250 songs free from your own collection.

The 5GB of storage is Amazon Cloud Drive, a separate thing, and doesn't count towards your Cloud Player storage.

yeah 250 isn't much and it's only music brought directly from Amazon, I've brought several CD's from Amazon listed vendors and their not showing.

Their essentially saying were going to give you a digital copy of any CD you've brought from us and only us as long as you store it on our servers.

It's a nice idea to try and get you to use their service but I'm sticking with Google Music.
Gareth Halfacree 27th June 2013, 15:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
Their essentially saying were going to give you a digital copy of any CD you've brought from us and only us as long as you store it on our servers.
Load Cloud Player. Choose a song. Hit the 'Download' button. Get a DRM-free, 256Kb/s MP3. Store locally, or upload to Google Music, iTunes Match or A. N. Other service. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Sadly, if you're using Cloud Player in a browser, you have to download each song individually - but for free, it's better than a kick in the unmentionables.
Phalanx 27th June 2013, 16:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Sadly, if you're using Cloud Player in a browser, you have to download each song individually - but for free, it's better than a kick in the unmentionables.

*points at checkboxes on left of each and every song in the list, then points at "Download" button at the top*

You're welcome. :)
Gareth Halfacree 27th June 2013, 16:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phalanx
*points at checkboxes on left of each and every song in the list, then points at "Download" button at the top*
You had me all excited then, and Amazon brought me crashing back down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazon
On Linux systems, Cloud Player only supports downloading songs one at a time. To download your music, deselect all tick boxes, select the tick box for the song you want to download, then click the "Download" button.
Phalanx 27th June 2013, 16:18 Quote
Ah, Linux. Apologies, I'm a Windows man. :)
PCBuilderSven 27th June 2013, 17:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazon
On Linux systems, Cloud Player only supports downloading songs one at a time. To download your music, deselect all tick boxes, select the tick box for the song you want to download, then click the "Download" button.

Why should the OS matter? Surely a download link should be OS independent if the site is even half ways intelligently engineered - a zip file containing the files would work on (almost) every OS.
Andy Mc 27th June 2013, 19:17 Quote
So far none of the CDs I have bought (2) have been added to my account. Thankfully. Not sure I want Pop Party 4 as an MP3.

I'm guessing this service is also not for compilation albums either.
phuzz 27th June 2013, 19:50 Quote
I ended up with almost 100 new albums getting added, including a few I guess must have been gifts (Stereophonics? well, ok then).
Oddly, several of the albums were the special editions, when I only bought the standard version, cheers Amazon! You're my favourite tax-dodging monopoly!
Gradius 27th June 2013, 21:55 Quote
mp3 is super low quality, it should be long abandoned, unless you don't hear to real music, just NOISE.
Chris_Waddle 28th June 2013, 09:49 Quote
I'll be honest I think it's a great offer. They didn't have to do it and I'm impressed that they have.

Best of all I've had a My Bloody Valentine album added that I had stolen several years back and never got around to replacing. It's playing now as I type, so thanks Amazon, made my day.
Gareth Halfacree 28th June 2013, 10:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCBuilderSven
Why should the OS matter? Surely a download link should be OS independent if the site is even half ways intelligently engineered - a zip file containing the files would work on (almost) every OS.
The OS shouldn't matter - especially as I'm using the same browser, Firefox, as I would be using were I on Windows. My guess is that Amazon is tying the multiple file download feature into the Amazon MP3 Downloader, part of the Amazon MP3 Store - and a piece of software that is Windows and Mac exclusive.

I get around it on the Amazon MP3 Store by using a third-party package that can parse the AMZ files intended for the Amazon MP3 Downloader and grab the files - but the Cloud Player won't let me get at the AMZ files. Although, I wonder what would happen if I spoofed a Windows user agent...
MSHunter 28th June 2013, 11:20 Quote
Wow it doesn't include music you bought previously as MP3 download. Very odd.
Grimloon 28th June 2013, 12:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSHunter
Wow it doesn't include music you bought previously as MP3 download. Very odd.

I thought that was an already existing feature? It certainly is on my account :|
MSHunter 28th June 2013, 16:41 Quote
Never mind took 30 minutes to load my purchase history, but finally its all there. Even the stuff I bought on the mobile app that used to not show anywhere. So yeah first log in it takes a while to compile I guess.
Podge4 28th June 2013, 17:11 Quote
I've bought loads of CDs on Amazon but most have been through marketplace sellers. And most I've bought for myself are converted to either flac or 320kbps MP3
phuzz 29th June 2013, 20:04 Quote
I can't hear the difference between MP3 and Flac/CD, but that's from destroying my hearing at too many gigs ;0
mclean007 30th June 2013, 20:53 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradius
mp3 is super low quality, it should be long abandoned, unless you don't hear to real music, just NOISE.
Amazing how many times you hear this trotted out. It's nonsense. Okay, mp3 is not the most efficient codec (ie more modern codecs can deliver equivalent quality in smaller filesize) but at high bitrate (320, 256 - as offered by amazon - or even 192 Kbps) a well encoded mp3 has repeatedly been shown to be indistinguishable from the original in blind ABX tests conducted by audiophiles on very high end equipment. Do you have some sort of magic ears that let you hear the (empirically imperceptible) differences or are you sitting comparing waveforms on a monitor?
mclean007 30th June 2013, 20:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodspoon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Seems very odd to me, how do they know you still own the original.
If you have done as mi1ez did and bought them as a gift or even sold them could you technically be done for copyright infringement ?

You make an interesting and very good point.
Buy on Amazon then sell on ebay = free music
Well no, because you obviously won't get the full value back, especially after you pay for postage. Anyway, why go to such lengths? You could have achieved the same result before auto rip by buying, ripping and selling the CDs, but then if you're going to be so cheap about skanking "free" music then I'm sure you'll just cut out the intermediate steps and acquire your music from a torrent site.
mclean007 30th June 2013, 20:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by phuzz
I can't hear the difference between MP3 and Flac/CD, but that's from destroying my hearing at too many gigs ;0
No, you're selling your ears short - it's because a well encoded high bitrate mp3 is psychoacoustically transparent (indistinguishable to the human ear from the original). That's what lossy encoders do - compress by throwing away inaudible detail.
Xir 3rd July 2013, 11:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by mclean007
Amazing how many times you hear this trotted out.

Well, somebody has to sell moondusted speaker cables, gold plated fiberoptic connectors, or tell audiophiles it matters which way round they plug their amp into the AC wall socket. :D
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