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How To Make Your Own Watercooling Reservoir

Comments 1 to 25 of 32

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Jehla 28th February 2010, 12:26 Quote
Brilliant! Been looking for something like this.
robyholmes 28th February 2010, 12:46 Quote
Alas some modding! Great work bit-tech!
PingCrosby 28th February 2010, 12:47 Quote
Excellent...well done and very informative
The_Beast 28th February 2010, 13:06 Quote
Very nice, cool tubing trick too
Tattysnuc 28th February 2010, 13:14 Quote
Do you not have to be carefulabout using metals in a cooling loop? I've read about galvanic erosion or something like that?

It's to do with having two different metals. Don't know much more about it than that.
Lizard 28th February 2010, 13:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tattysnuc
Do you not have to be carefulabout using metals in a cooling loop? I've read about galvanic erosion or something like that?

Yes, different metals will cause galvanic corrosion, in which ions move from one metal to the other. It doesn't happen quickly, but it will eventually destroy your waterblocks/fittings/radiator/pump.

Which is why you should always add a corrosion inhibitor to the coolant (along with an algae killer too).
capnPedro 28th February 2010, 14:18 Quote
That's why things are nickel plated. It prevents corrosion. A rule of thumb is to use either all copper blocks/rads/etc or all aluminium blocks.
rickysio 28th February 2010, 14:56 Quote
Or a cheap(er) res - cut up a water bottle. Use the bottle cap as the filler, and use two holes at the side for input and output. I used to use a bottle for pneumatics, so I did find out that blutack is something exceedingly airtight. ;)
Yemerich 28th February 2010, 15:35 Quote
Now THAT's a cool article!

Good work!
feedayeen 28th February 2010, 16:03 Quote
What about those of us who want the ultra large reservoirs that water beds provide?
Zurechial 28th February 2010, 16:18 Quote
Great article, very useful and informative!

That trick with the tubing is excellent too, I'm definitely going to make use of that in future.
glaeken 28th February 2010, 16:50 Quote
Love the air pressure and tubing tricks. ;)
Alec** 28th February 2010, 17:54 Quote
This article has fantastic timing!! Me and a mate are planning a old Stacker Res-Orection, the clue is in the name that it will feature a large (custom made) Res. Was planning to order the parts tonight and this article has helped (especially with type of plastic) Thanks! Should be posting results in a couple of weeks (might start a thread up on here).
disturbed13 28th February 2010, 18:24 Quote
now thats cool
nice job
Burnout21 28th February 2010, 18:45 Quote
perfect timing! I am currently designing a reservoir for my project and i was wondering about using acrylic cement. I've used it plenty for bonding other projects but was a little worried about using it for a reservoir.

Also the tubing trick is awesome!
Xtrafresh 28th February 2010, 19:58 Quote
http://welikeitfresh.com/files/2008/12/bunny-thread-relevant-to-my-interests.jpg
I'm absolutely interested in doing this, i have some very specific requirements for the res that's getting a key spot in my next mod. Great stuff man!
talladega 28th February 2010, 20:33 Quote
Excellent guide! I liked the part about forming the tubing. Very helpful!
Darkraven 28th February 2010, 21:51 Quote
Well done article, nicely written and good layout. Enjoyed reading it, course the information has tobe just stored on minds back page while waiting to get rich & famous to finally get into water cooling.:D
dslickness 28th February 2010, 23:38 Quote
Thank you so much for posting a Modding Article!! Bit-tech.net used to have so many modding guides (some of the best), and then suddenly they trashed most of the guides.

Anyway, thanks for the info. I wish I knew more about Extruded Acrylic back then. I will come back to this page for info on tube molding.
proxess 28th February 2010, 23:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alec**
This article has fantastic timing!! Me and a mate are planning a old Stacker Res-Orection, the clue is in the name that it will feature a large (custom made) Res. Was planning to order the parts tonight and this article has helped (especially with type of plastic) Thanks! Should be posting results in a couple of weeks (might start a thread up on here).

If it's a standing reservoir, you can call it the Res-Erection!

[/pun]

Awesome article! DIY is much more fun!
Bindibadgi 28th February 2010, 23:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dslickness
Thank you so much for posting a Modding Article!! Bit-tech.net used to have so many modding guides (some of the best), and then suddenly they trashed most of the guides.

Anyway, thanks for the info. I wish I knew more about Extruded Acrylic back then. I will come back to this page for info on tube molding.

To be frank, we only ever had a few dozen guides, but we used to do less content so it seems like more. Now we do 10 pieces of unique content week-in-week-out. And you have to say since last .. sept, we've been pretty consistent with our modding content and had the huge mod of the year compo ;)

Also, people have seen most of it all before to be honest, and most of the guides in the modding and project log forum are where the hardcore modders find them. Finding something excellently written, unique and well documented that's long enough for the front page is quite difficult.

They generally don't make great front page traffic drivers and certainly don't help us secure advertising, which unfortunately is the commercial endeavour of any professional website (I enjoy getting paid! :D). Actual mods on the other hand don't either, but the traffic and community relevance are far, far greater - it promotes more discussion and ideas than just a single how-to article, so we're much more happy to keep that alive just for the community :);)
talladega 1st March 2010, 06:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
To be frank, we only ever had a few dozen guides, but we used to do less content so it seems like more. Now we do 10 pieces of unique content week-in-week-out. And you have to say since last .. sept, we've been pretty consistent with our modding content and had the huge mod of the year compo ;)

Also, people have seen most of it all before to be honest, and most of the guides in the modding and project log forum are where the hardcore modders find them. Finding something excellently written, unique and well documented that's long enough for the front page is quite difficult.

They generally don't make great front page traffic drivers and certainly don't help us secure advertising, which unfortunately is the commercial endeavour of any professional website (I enjoy getting paid! :D). Actual mods on the other hand don't either, but the traffic and community relevance are far, far greater - it promotes more discussion and ideas than just a single how-to article, so we're much more happy to keep that alive just for the community :);)
Hi Frank! I think there has been a good amount of content in the past 6 months or so. It went through a slow period for a while but in the past few months it's much better. I agree there is not a whole lot you can really do as most all of it has been done.


I would suggest maybe taking some of the cool ideas that people do in their project logs and try and get them to do a piece for the front page like this reservoir making thing.

Maybe a thing on doing fancy sleeving/cable management, build a lcd fan controller etc... Even if some stuff has been done before or seems rather basic, put a couple different topics in one article.

There are many cool ideas people have in their project logs and its a great place to see them, but with sooo many active project logs at a time I dont even see half of them and probably miss out on a lot of cool ideas.
Darkraven 1st March 2010, 06:59 Quote
I understand Bindi's point, getting paid is a biggie. Still, I wonder how many company reps monitor the modding community and trends as closely as possible. Seems to me it would behoove them to do so, even the ones unwilling to sponcer people.

For example who would have thought a few years ago MDPC-X would set the standard in sleeving and raise the bar for someone else to try and achieve. And could they get people to actually pay the price for their excellence and be willing to order overseas with it's freight cost, seems to me Bit-Tech played a major role in getting the product known for that to happen.

As a modder and small consumer I can't foot the bill for a site like this, but I would hope my consumer dollar is at least in part going to companys doing so and being aware of the community. After all, Bit-Tech not only provides a great service for modders but the companys we buy from as well.

I hope this is not a vague point or I'm out in left field with it.
HourBeforeDawn 1st March 2010, 08:49 Quote
wow well that last page on tubing was very helpful, will keep that in mind for the future. :)
[USRF]Obiwan 1st March 2010, 10:12 Quote
I do like the tube bending trick, that can come in handy. But doing a reservoir takes to much time and money for tools, Plexiglas. glue, etc. to do yourself. There are a dozen reservoirs out there in different price ranges. I do however have the respect for modders doing their own reservoir.
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