bit-tech.net

How To Take Better Photographs Of Your Mod

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rickysio 15th February 2010, 09:24 Quote
Or another simple rule of the thumb : Ditch your phone and get a proper camera. ;)
nlancaster 15th February 2010, 09:28 Quote
Take lots of pictures. then pic the best of those to post is also a great idea. I always take at least 2 shots, more likely 3 or 4, of any particular shot I want to get.
mi1ez 15th February 2010, 09:51 Quote
Really interesting and in-depth article. Gets people who wouldn't normally even think about how their camera works taking better shots!
bahgger 15th February 2010, 10:06 Quote
Awesome stuff! I just need a mod and a DSLR now! But seriously, this should go a long way in improving up and coming modders :)
Jipa 15th February 2010, 10:09 Quote
1. Have enough lights around
2. Take enough photos
3. Don't necessarily post ALL of the many
4. If the photo sucks, don't post

Simple.

EDIT: Also top tip, you can grab a cheap and cheerful studio flash off ebay for £20. Make shooting product shots a real pleasure.

EDIT2: Oh
5. Shoot in RAW if possible
6. Edit your photos (levels, white balance, takes five seconds per shot and can make all the difference)
Kúsař 15th February 2010, 10:33 Quote
Awesome!
I always wondered who's taking pictures of mobos at BT/CPC. Some pics looks really nice...
Javerh 15th February 2010, 11:00 Quote
A good guide and I completely agree with Jipa. I think another guide is in order about photoshopping the pictures before posting.
InSanCen 15th February 2010, 11:19 Quote
http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=38260

One of these, 2 "Student" goose neck lamps, with a 100W reflector in each, and job done for under £30. Any tripod that will hold the Camera in a comfortable and stable manner will do.

I have 3 of those (Bought at £20 each... doh!), stitched together, and can photograph Midi-ATX cases easily.
stonedsurd 15th February 2010, 11:30 Quote
Great guide. In my opinion, good lighting is half the battle won.
Anfield 15th February 2010, 11:38 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickysio
Or another simple rule of the thumb : Ditch your phone and get a proper camera. ;)

Funny you should say that, some Phones have actually superior Cameras now compared to the cheaper point and shoot cameras (like for example the Samsung Pixon ones which simply can't be beaten if it comes to fixing what your shaky hands screw up).
rickysio 15th February 2010, 12:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anfield
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickysio
Or another simple rule of the thumb : Ditch your phone and get a proper camera. ;)

Funny you should say that, some Phones have actually superior Cameras now compared to the cheaper point and shoot cameras (like for example the Samsung Pixon ones which simply can't be beaten if it comes to fixing what your shaky hands screw up).

Perhaps, but DSLRs are always superior! :D
Axly 15th February 2010, 13:00 Quote
Perhaps the cheapest point-and-shoot cameras aren't included in the term "proper camera". I have yet to see a mobile camera produce photos that beat my old Canon a540 or even the Nikon Coolpix 3200 3Mpix cheapo. Both are used as "unfriendly environment" cameras (partycams) but both produce crisp, sharp photos with rich colours provided you have enough light.
Then again, though I'd consider using the Canon for taking in-progress shots of a mod, both are in my opinion borderline "proper cameras". I'd use the D60 and save the D300 for the final shots ;) DSLR's are hard to beat.

Regarding the article, fantastic and much needed :)
Axly 15th February 2010, 13:01 Quote
(though, I haven't seen the Pixon one yet.. got to take a look)
Dave Lister 15th February 2010, 13:05 Quote
This is a really informative and interesting article. Is there anyway i can save it as a favorite to my BT profile ? for future reference.
Claave 15th February 2010, 15:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Lister
This is a really informative and interesting article. Is there anyway i can save it as a favorite to my BT profile ? for future reference.

add a link to it in your sig?
Problemchild49 15th February 2010, 15:15 Quote
Interesting article, I think I'll dig out my old camera and give it a try
lenne0815 15th February 2010, 15:22 Quote
thanks guys, nice read !
Pookeyhead 15th February 2010, 15:29 Quote
Pretty good article covering the basics. It's really hard producing a simple photography tutorial, as you need to pitch it at a level for beginners, and include the theory basics in a way that doesn't involve theory. LOL.

Anyone wanting more, a few of us put together a thread years ago. It's still up...

http://forums.bit-tech.net/showthread.php?t=129356
ali_robb2000 15th February 2010, 16:11 Quote
Good article covering a lot of topics.

I'd say manual mode isn't necessary most of the time. Aperture mode can be used for most situations as it's probably not necessary to manually alter the shutter speed when taking these kinds of pictures and exposure compensation can then be used to alter the brightness of the photo.

Regarding file formats, .jpg is a lot easier to work with (no need to use a RAW converter and most simple edits can still be done in Photoshop, including white balance). Also, the 'Image Quality' setting usually has a minimal effect on the detail of an image and the effect of altering this definitely wouldn't be visible once the picture has been resized and uploaded to the forums. It does make the file size a lot larger though, so I would always leave it set to 'normal'.

This site has a lot of useful info, especially the 'Why your camera doesn't matter' article!
http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech.htm
Anfield 15th February 2010, 16:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickysio
Perhaps, but DSLRs are always superior! :D

Of course no phone camera can compete with a DSLR, but its surprising how little difference there is between cheaper point and shoot ones compared to phone cameras.
Xtrafresh 15th February 2010, 19:34 Quote
ohh this is very useful! I'll read more in-depth when i have the time, but for now... thanks!

Also:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javerh
I think another guide is in order about photoshopping the pictures before posting.
+1
KnightHawk2112 15th February 2010, 21:51 Quote
Great article, very helpful.

Just a couple of additional comments as someone who has done a fair amount of close-up/product photography (no mods, yet).

1. As a general rule: If the Shutter Speed is less than 1/focal length, it is nearly impossible to hand hold the shot. Example: If the focal length of your lens (or the setting of your point and shoot) is 60mm, the the slowest shutter speed you can hand hold is 1/60th of a second. That being said, get a tripod - it's much easier and is one less thing to think about when you are taking your pictures.

2. There are a fair number of daylight quality Compact Florescent bulbs available, use them. They keep the colors from shifting in your picture (expert Photoshop users can correct for this, but I find it much easier to use these lights).

3. As I think someone earlier said, take lots of pictures, post the best ones.

Look forward to see the results.
GregTheRotter 15th February 2010, 23:23 Quote
Here's one for some of the bit tech staff. Take the hood off when you are using the pop-up flash. I remember seeing a shot a while back with this massive shadow on it, that was caused by the above xD
GregTheRotter 15th February 2010, 23:23 Quote
doh, that was completely random xD The shot in question was at some event or something :P
JasonCase24 16th February 2010, 00:28 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickysio
Perhaps, but DSLRs are always superior! :D

You're absolutely right! But, it's too expensive! I with I have one soon cause photography is really one of my hobby. Something that I actually enjoy.
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