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Building a Modular PSU

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p3n 21st September 2007, 11:39 Quote
neat mod but why on earth does the atx power (24pin) need tobe modular?!
DougEdey 21st September 2007, 11:42 Quote
you may want to use it as a second PSU
Mankz 21st September 2007, 11:43 Quote
Because it just plain looks cool.
samkiller42 21st September 2007, 11:44 Quote
Thats is well neat, quite litterally.
Nice job.

Sam
Darkedge 21st September 2007, 11:59 Quote
nice job but really question the point. Modular ATX power supplied (silent and otherwise) are very freely available and not expensive at all. Doing it yourself I would worry massively about the safety doing it and afterwards, not to mention the probable loss of efficiency. You really think a serial port is up to the job? I certainly don't considering how rubbish they are.

I have to say it's a nice guide but only as an extreme modding guide not a serious idea with any merit.
dfhaii 21st September 2007, 12:13 Quote
How much current is that db25 connector rated for? Same question with the microphone jacks?
MrBadidea 21st September 2007, 12:16 Quote
I second the "I'm failing to see the point", err, point.

First of all, the end result looks like a £5 piece of crap you can buy from any dodgy computer shop on the face of the planet. Then cross that with something that looks like a dog tried to eat it.

I suppose if you wanted a gnarled piece of metal to call a powersupply, you've got the formula spot on.
kai5183 21st September 2007, 12:40 Quote
keep up ur good work!!!
kosch 21st September 2007, 12:55 Quote
Interesting article.

Love the humorous comments lol.
Da Dego 21st September 2007, 13:46 Quote
Well, for those of you missing the point or thinking it looks bad, keep in mind that this is an "unpolished" work meant to illustrate how you can do this yourself. It's not even painted, which would make it look a LOT better!

Here are the reasons I figured it warranted attention:

1) Say you want to build an HTPC out of spare parts. You have an older, low-power PSU - spend $20 and make it nicely modular and perfectly fit the theme of your case, or spend $75 on a boring, black modular unit with cheap plastic connectors that has low efficiency and overly high wattage?

2) Say you're looking for something that is unique to your mod. This allows you to choose the connectors that YOU see fit - a 25-pin and some mic jacks are just the tip of the iceberg, really. And, building it yourself allows other stylistic elements that you wouldn't have with a normal PSU.

Basically, that's why I felt this deserved a little love. Lots of people in the PL and Modding forums ask just how to do this, knowing that it can be done and not wanting to spend an extra $30 over a non-modular PSU for just some crappy plastic connectors.

Hope that explains it! As I said, it's not for everyone, and I understand you can 'just go buy one'. But then again, that's what sorts a mod from a pre-mod, and also allows you to do lots of little things differently than a manufacturer, which will use whatever are the cheapest connections to get the job done.
dfhaii 21st September 2007, 13:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Da Dego

2) Say you're looking for something that is unique to your mod. This allows you to choose the connectors that YOU see fit - a 25-pin and some mic jacks are just the tip of the iceberg, really. And, building it yourself allows other stylistic elements that you wouldn't have with a normal PSU.

Surely choosing connectors that you see fit would involve choosing something which is rated for the current which will be drawn through it? It really can't be hard to get hold of a pair of atx connectors for instance so that it would still be modular but not shifty.
Da Dego 21st September 2007, 13:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfhaii
Surely choosing connectors that you see fit would involve choosing something which is rated for the current which will be drawn through it? It really can't be hard to get hold of a pair of atx connectors for instance so that it would still be modular but not shifty.

Sure! But depending on the setup, you *can* get away with a serial port. ;) It really depends on the system that you build to connect to the PSU. The serial port was chosen for an ease of wiring illustration and because it looks different than the ATX connector. But honestly, it won't catch your computer on fire unless you've done something very, very wrong. ;)

Though your rating concern is valid, unless you're trying to run some 650-750w PSU and a quad core with SLI, chances are you won't blow things up. I'm pretty sure the fragility of these things is a touch over-emphasised. It *IS* a good warning, though, and people should be careful. Maybe I should include that in the article.
MrBadidea 21st September 2007, 14:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Da Dego
Well, for those of you missing the point or thinking it looks bad, keep in mind that this is an "unpolished" work meant to illustrate how you can do this yourself. It's not even painted, which would make it look a LOT better!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Da Dego
It *IS* a good warning, though, and people should be careful. Maybe I should include that in the article.

Maybe you should have an attempt at making the final product look finished, than look like a pile of crap, before you go posting articles about it on a rather large enthusiast-based computer website.
dfhaii 21st September 2007, 14:15 Quote
As far as I know the 5v stand by line on an ATX psu is considered very low current, however the ATX specification says this should be 720mA. This suggests to me that the +3.3, +5, and +12 lines to the motherboard will have considerably more than 1 amp drawn through them, as such this dsub connector isn't actually suitable.
Da Dego 21st September 2007, 14:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBadidea
Maybe you should have an attempt at making the final product look finished, than look like a pile of crap, before you go posting articles about it on a rather large enthusiast-based computer website.

:( Guess you can't please everyone. My point wasn't to create a finished masterpiece, it was meant to explain the basics of how to go about this type of project - somehow going through a three-stage painting process, vinyl dye, etc. to really top it off seemed to be missing the idea. I'm sorry if you felt otherwise, but it appears other people seemed to at least get the drift. I felt that if painting and everything were included, you'd have also missed exactly how well the connectors can hide the metalworking job - which would have made it seem more like you need perfectly-filed cuts and a sharp eye to do this, which is simply not the case.

Anyhow, thanks for your comments, though I think "pile of crap" and telling me how large the site I work for might be a bit unnecessary. ;)
naokaji 21st September 2007, 14:42 Quote
I dont understand how someone can call it piece of crap....

i find it a great article..

besides that.. not every psu is modular... also some people need psu's with unusual connector positions calbe lenght whatever for projects... so the article definitly has its value even if you can pick up a modular psu at a shop.
IccleD 21st September 2007, 14:50 Quote
Firstly I'd like to say thank you for making this guide, highlighting that even the simple PSU can be modded, just as much as the case itself. It was informative, clear, well written & very easy to understand.

However, I feel that the way you've been slated by some of the "Members" regarding your choice of parts is uncalled for. It's quite clear that this isn't the finished product, and mearly a Guide or a How To. The Modder that would undertake such a task (Not me, I'm not one for playing with power supplies!) would no doubt spend more time in finishing the PSU to a MotM standard. The illistration of how you can use different connectors was something that sparked a glimmer of thought within my somewhat "Empty at Work" noggin.

These Members who slated your write up would, no doubt, demand the your respect when you post in thier logs, so I can't work out how you've remained so calm, go figure. Especially given your position as Bit-Tech Staff, although abuse of power may not be looked upon well I guess.

Once again thank you for the How To Guide, it was a very interesting read.
Brett89 21st September 2007, 16:35 Quote
I think it's a great article, it illustrates the concept behind it, you can change the design to be your own. Isn't that what modding is all about?! Thanks for posting this.
wolff000 21st September 2007, 16:48 Quote
Trolls go home. This is a great mod. Anyone that says otherwise is no true modder and has no vision. I can't wait to start ripping apart some old power supplies.
FeRaL 21st September 2007, 17:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by p3n
neat mod but why on earth does the atx power (24pin) need tobe modular?!

Because ours go to 11...
Spaceraver 21st September 2007, 17:56 Quote
I can see the point in makin your own Modular PSU, and i somewhat understand those who say it's fugly.But this is a "how to" people, not a finished mod in itself mmkay??
Stonewall78 21st September 2007, 19:32 Quote
As was posting in the thread about this mod, using a DB25 is not a very good idea. Those pins are good for about 1 amp max. I think this mod is good in theory but it should be noted in the article that a DB25 is not the best connector to be using. Personally I don't care how it looks, I just care that it is safe and if someone uses that connector on a high wattage supply it won't be.
Da Dego 21st September 2007, 19:53 Quote
I have put a note in on the second page regarding the DB25 and higher wattage PSUs. :) I hope this helps!
Bbq.of.DooM 21st September 2007, 20:34 Quote
There are 2 faster ways to discharge the capacitors:

1. Pull the power while the pc is running. The power cable. Even if you just start it up and pull the power cable out 3 seconds later, it works.

2. Unplug the power cord, but keep the power switch on the back of the psu on. Then just press the pc power switch a few times. The fans will spin for a second or so, and then you're done. Capacitors drained.
EmJay 21st September 2007, 21:04 Quote
Thanks for the how-to! I'd like to see more of this kind of thing on Bit-Tech, it's quite useful.
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