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Do we need Blu-ray drives?

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Vo0Ds 28th February 2012, 11:03 Quote
I personally don't use and have no need for a Blu-ray drive, my HTPC also has no optical drive. SDHC/micro SD/USB Flash would be a more interesting format for distributing media physically.

I can't see myself buying a Blu-ray R/W any time soon and think optical media aren't the future. We just need to get rid of crappy compression and get higher speed internet to say bye-bye to shiny coasters.
r3loaded 28th February 2012, 11:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jqim
I want BR quality videos but without the clutter of an optical drive.
Again, the pirates are ahead of the industry on this one. You're able to download either the full Blu-ray disc image with AACS removed or a slimmed down copy which has just the main movie and one or two audio tracks (with no further compression applied). The resulting file can be easily played in VLC or MPC-HC with no issues.

And there you go - Blu-ray quality video with neither the clutter of an optical drive nor the bloated playback software that you need to pay to unlock features. If only Hollywood were smart enough to make it as simple as this...
azrael- 28th February 2012, 11:15 Quote
While VLC (apparently) now can play BD format discs it _CANNOT_ decrypt the content. And therein lies the rub, since you can count the number of (commercial) unencrypted BD discs on one hand, if that.

As for the necessity of BD or any other optical format I see it mainly for archival purposes. HDD prices per GB are certainly better than BD-RE prices per GB, but I wouldn't trust the contents of HDDs not going bad for more than a couple of years at most. Even with optical formats there's a need to make sure the archived data is still valid. That need would be even greater with magnetically stored information.

Oh, and I for one love to own my music, movies and games on physical media. Sure, streaming and downloading can be more convenient, but I like to be able to actually hold what I've paid money for. Alas, Big Content really loves the idea of us not owning any thing. And yes, I'm aware that I do not actually own e.g. the music, but I can put a disc into my CD player at my own leisure.
ironsmack 28th February 2012, 11:17 Quote
My main uses for my BR drive is to rip my own collection, archive photos, backup of important documents and the occassional burning of movies that my friends request.

So, i still have uses for my DVD/BR drive.
Coltch 28th February 2012, 11:22 Quote
I have looked at putting a BD drive in my PC, but can't be bothered with having to run additonal bloat.

I'll just stick to watching BD movies on my stanalone Panasonic Player and the DVD in my PC will continue to be used for DVD's and CD's via WMC
Shirty 28th February 2012, 11:38 Quote
We don't own anything that can play blu-rays in our household.

Why?

Because the only 1080 screen in the building is my U2311H, all of our TVs are still good old fashioned CRTs and will be until they stop working!
atlas 28th February 2012, 11:54 Quote
I think it comes down to either being very useful for those who have media pc's or generally watch a lot of media and like high quality or pretty much useless for those who don't. Really just a usage case thing but no longer essential that's for sure.
rollo 28th February 2012, 11:58 Quote
Steam gets all my money for pc sales last thing that came on a disk that I brought was Starcraft 2 and after install that disk was no longer needed

My DVD drive is now never used got a USB one that I keep just in case but I don't even install windows of a disk far quicker to USB stick it on ( ms website provides files and the way to do it for those interested )

I'd half expect metro to be a digital Only release
Baz 28th February 2012, 12:37 Quote
I'd argue absolutely not. I haven't had an optical drive in my PC for almost three years now. Everything is digital delivery. Sure I have a blu-ray player in my lounge, but backing up blu-rays eats hard drives space faster than I eat Peanut Butter Kit Kat Chunkys. We've abandoned physical media for music, and increasingly for games; only a matter of time before video too, especially with the rise of services like Netflix and Love Film Instant.

All hail our physical media-less future!
HandMadeAndroid 28th February 2012, 12:50 Quote
I found a solution to all my blu-ray woes, I went to Richer-Sounds and purchased a Sony player, works every time.
Madness_3d 28th February 2012, 12:51 Quote
Use Blu-Ray Drive loads, Use ODD for much legacy softwares and games and movies ... need Blu-ray drive... Yes Physical Media is dying out, but it'll be a while before the internet infrastructure is solid enough to stream and store everything in the cloud. Till then, I'll keep my ODD thanks :)
law99 28th February 2012, 13:01 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverik-sg1
I have a PS3, it's brilliant for playback of blu-ray films - but only 10% of the films I have are on blu-ray and with DVD upscaling and only a 1080i TV I don't really benefit from the what shoul be extra definition etc....

Back to the PC, games are sold on DVD's and Blu-Ray is not standard in PC builds, when Wrath of The Lich King was released it came on 5CD's (how long had DVD's been sold as standard on PC's by then).

The challenge is that apart from capacity, what does it bring to the PC user, write speeds don't look to be an improvement over DVD speeds (granted you are writing to a higher capacity disk, thats not the point, the perception is that it's slow.

By the time this product has the opportunity to be 'standard' on PC builds, the 'next big thing' will be out, delvelopers simply won't release blu-ray based games if the userbase of the drive is not greater than 80% of it's target market - this should of been a stepping stone to something, instead it's cornered itself into being the standard for films and probably PS4.

Shame really and as for HD-DVD, in terms of benefits and progression, am I mistaken in thinking that this offered more than just 'good for movies'?


Hd_dvd was smaller capacity wise. It's only benefit at the time was it was cheaper to convert fabs to support it and the industry had been quicker to devise standards for the format, esp, interactive features. Otherwise, blu-ray was better purely because of capacity. There was rumours at the time of features that would be at the limits of hd-dvd's capacity with 7.1 surround dts hd ma and way beyond the 2 hour mark. Can't attest for the truth in that.
hurrakan 28th February 2012, 13:14 Quote
A blu-ray drive is absolutely necessary if you want to rip your blu-ray discs into a digital format and store them on your local HDD for easy + simple streaming.

I've found that the digital copies that come with some blu-ray discs are useless. They are filled with DRM, expire within one year, and can only be watched in a specific format and/or device. Yet another pathetic attempt to stop piracy that actually encourages it.
bowman 28th February 2012, 13:23 Quote
I haven't installed a DVD drive in my machine in years, let alone a blu-ray drive.

Physical formats are dead.
bigc90210 28th February 2012, 13:38 Quote
for me personally the only reason i have dvd drives are for installing windows (and perhaps for networking drivers also, though usually windows picks them up). As for blu-ray, i'd have pretty much no use for it. All my media is on a nas, so i wouldnt use it for watching movies.

In fact, when USB3 gets to be common place to the point where USB3 memory sticks get affordable, il probably end up putting a bootable copy of windows on a memory stick, then i'd have no use for DVD drives either!
The Infamous Mr D 28th February 2012, 13:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3loaded

Again, the pirates are ahead of the industry on this one. You're able to download either the full Blu-ray disc image with AACS removed or a slimmed down copy which has just the main movie and one or two audio tracks (with no further compression applied). The resulting file can be easily played in VLC or MPC-HC with no issues.

And there you go - Blu-ray quality video with neither the clutter of an optical drive nor the bloated playback software that you need to pay to unlock features. If only Hollywood were smart enough to make it as simple as this...

While I will probably get a call from the MPAA this week for saying so, I have a Blu-Ray drive and own several Blu-Ray movie discs. The PowerDVD software is awful and playback is terrible even on a well-equipped media centre, plus its integration with WMC is naff at best.

As such, it makes my life easier to keep my Blu-ray drive on my main PC, rip the disc once I've bought it and then dump the resultant file to my home storage NAS box then stream to my media centre from there. I retain all the useful chapter information, subtitles and so on by storing it in MKV format. And playing the file doesn't cause WMC to soil itself.
goldstar0011 28th February 2012, 13:47 Quote
I have an external blu-ray (salvaged from a broken laptop and put in a case), I bought 1 film to test it and never used since except to install Windows on netbooks but thats lessened with the use of USB sticks

I think everyone (average population) though blu-ray would win thanks to the PS3 and that MS's preference to streaming was a silly idea but with fast internet from the likes of Virgin and cheap streaming sevices it far easier to rent a move this way than to buy a disc or rent and dela with posting.

All my PC's have DVD drives as I have a big DVD collection but I don't use that much either as all computers are networked for streaming

Other than burning a DVD for photo DVD's or backup peoples files I don't use my drives much
phuzz 28th February 2012, 14:01 Quote
My only exposure to blu-ray was when my (then) flatmate bought a new 40" Sony tv, and a BR player came free. So, we set it all up and stucka BR film in and were impressed. Then we stuck a DVD in, which the player upscaled and found not much difference between that and the BR.
I think on my 22" monitor I'll be just fine with DVDs.
(if you can tell the difference though, feel free to spend loads of money on a home theatre setup, I just don't need to)
Bauul 28th February 2012, 14:13 Quote
The point of Blu-Rays is a simple, read-only format for selling HD films on to the masses. That is really its only purpose - take any aspect of that reason out and there are other formats that do it better.

If your the kind of person who understands the benefit of HD over SD, chances are you'd rather watch a film on a TV, not a monitor, so the only reason anyone would need to use a Blu-Ray disk in a PC is storage.

However, USB sticks for personal use and the cloud for everything else just makes better sense, so Blu-Rays are redundant. Where you absolutely have to get a physical copy (the OS is always useful), DVDs are cheaper and no less usable.
Floyd 28th February 2012, 14:18 Quote
Dont have any disk media in my current PC.
I do have a USB one in a box "just in case" but thats maybe once in a year.
PureSilver 28th February 2012, 14:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrakan
A blu-ray drive is absolutely necessary if you want to rip your blu-ray discs into a digital format and store them on your local HDD for easy + simple streaming.

^ This - there are two reasons for owning a BD drive; one, for long-interval backups stored at a remote location (e.g. the office, or a bank safety deposit box, away from the risk of fire and theft), and two, for ripping BluRay movies for a home movie server. That way you only need one physical drive, you have the long-lasting original disc, and you have the on-demand convenience of streaming media within your own home. The next home server I build will have a BluRay writer for exactly these reasons - and cheers to whoever mentioned M-discs; now I know exactly what discs those six-monthly interval backups will be on!

My current home server has a DVD drive, and flash-card reader with integrated floppy drive. For the minimal cost involved, I find it better to be ready for anything than be inconvenienced later down the line...
Blarte 28th February 2012, 14:26 Quote
better to have something and not use it, than need it and not have it
[USRF]Obiwan 28th February 2012, 14:30 Quote
Well I recently bought a BluRay 3D player, a LG md660 and it playes everyhing, streams everyting from network or plays anything from attached usb sticks or HD.

it costs only 99 euro. And I did not buy it for playing br discs either...


Why should I watch movies on a PC? Where I need to buy expensive software and upgrade hardware to play BR discs, and buy expensive 3D bluray drive for PC

You can buy a 32GB USB stick for less then 20 euro or 64GB for 40 euro to backup important data. You can even upload your data to a box nowadays. Games you can download also.

I can't put a BR disc into my smart phone or tablet....

Any type of optical disc is not used today at all by me. The last time I burned a DVD was 6 years ago.
Never had a br drive. did not find any use for it. Also the wait time to write a disc is 2000 times longer then writing to external HD (sata or USB) or Stick of any kind. It probably is saver on that media then on Optical discs anyway.

Lets face it. DVD and BR discs are going to be obsolete in less then a decade. Everybody will stream from the net...
law99 28th February 2012, 14:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by phuzz
My only exposure to blu-ray was when my (then) flatmate bought a new 40" Sony tv, and a BR player came free. So, we set it all up and stucka BR film in and were impressed. Then we stuck a DVD in, which the player upscaled and found not much difference between that and the BR.
I think on my 22" monitor I'll be just fine with DVDs.
(if you can tell the difference though, feel free to spend loads of money on a home theatre setup, I just don't need to)

You cannot make detail that isn't there, there. /end of argument.

I have a budget/mid range home theatre setup of seperates and I can hear the difference between hd and SD let alone see it. The seeing is incredibly obvious. You sir may unfortunately need glasses, a hearing test or to rethink how far away you are from the tv. Also, with a proper av receiver and some decent speakers, plus satellites and sub... the difference is there by the truckload.

One of the things that made a big difference to my hearing with music especially was bi-wiring the speakers. There is a lot of control.

Hd streaming is dogs dinner also... And i don't like waiting for a download.
rpsgc 28th February 2012, 14:56 Quote
I only own a slim USB external DVD drive for the rare games I buy on DVD and updating the FW on my Crucial SSD (because they can't be arsed to release a FW for use with USB drives)
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