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Samsung 32GB Solid State Drive

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konsta 21st July 2007, 14:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim S
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2007/07/21/samsung_32gb_solid_state_drive/1

It feels like we've had to forever use a rotating metal disk to store our data, but now finally solid state drives, or SSDs, are falling into the consumer fold. The question is: was it worth the wait?

:)

I'm relatively certain that we've been using rotating glass disks to store our data for quite a long time now...
Xen0phobiak 21st July 2007, 14:46 Quote
/me looks forward to larger, faster, cheaper ones in around 2 years time :)
Bindibadgi 21st July 2007, 14:47 Quote
Well metal surface, Konsta. :P
hughwi 21st July 2007, 15:00 Quote
Whilst those results are a little underwhelming, this looks rather promising for the future :D
BioSniper 21st July 2007, 15:01 Quote
Did I miss it or were there no power usage tests? That'd be nice to see imo specifically in our more power concious society :)
mctigger 21st July 2007, 15:09 Quote
yeah power consumption would have been nice, does look promising for the future
Bindibadgi 21st July 2007, 15:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BioSniper
Did I miss it or were there no power usage tests? That'd be nice to see imo specifically in our more power concious society :)

No real point on a desktop system since it was designed for a notebook. We were testing it as an alternative for performance, rather then something for a low power solution. I may throw it in the EPIA testing I'm doing at the moment to see if I can get a really really low power desktop.
cpemma 21st July 2007, 15:26 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BioSniper
Did I miss it or were there no power usage tests? That'd be nice to see imo specifically in our more power concious society :)
How would you accurately measure the power usage of a device with no power lead? ;)
MR BUNGLE 21st July 2007, 15:32 Quote
- The laptop to standard PATA adaptor that I presume has been used would split the drive's connector to 40 pin IDE and a standard molex...

Mine does at least....
Bindibadgi 21st July 2007, 15:36 Quote
Yep, but in a desktop system just changing the CPU, graphics card or motherboard type will completely negate any effect of a single hard drive. In a 30W EPIA system it can make a significant difference to heat, noise and power.
Hamish 21st July 2007, 15:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpemma
How would you accurately measure the power usage of a device with no power lead? ;)

measure power usage of whole system with ssd in and then again with raptor and the seagate you used in the review
Morphes 21st July 2007, 16:47 Quote
I bet this would be amazing in a 360, I really am curious to see the review for the notebook
Nature 21st July 2007, 17:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morphes
I bet this would be amazing in a 360, I really am curious to see the review for the notebook

I'm not sure but "trusted reviews" did an article on this and I think by Mr. Swinburne (strange how he recycles..). In it, was a 6 to 8 page briefing on the note book preformance of this piece of korean hib-hob.
Hugo 21st July 2007, 17:59 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature
I'm not sure but "trusted reviews" did an article on this and I think by Mr. Swineburn (strange how he recycles..). In it, was a 6 to 8 page briefing on the note book preformance of this piece of korean hib-hob.

It was done by Riyad Emeran TR's editor-in-chief... Rich had nothing to do with it...

The SSD fitted Vaio review will be available HERE on Monday when the link becomes active.

The non-SSD review is HERE
Smilodon 21st July 2007, 18:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by konsta
I'm relatively certain that we've been using rotating glass disks to store our data for quite a long time now...

Some disks still use metal.

but the glass ones make a cooler noise when a laptop is dropped 6 meters.. :D
Bindibadgi 21st July 2007, 20:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature
I'm not sure but "trusted reviews" did an article on this and I think by Mr. Swinburne (strange how he recycles..). In it, was a 6 to 8 page briefing on the note book preformance of this piece of korean hib-hob.

Ed Chester did a TR review of it a few weeks ago, I'm doing a different review of it now. Someone at TR is doing the SSD Sony (different SSD in it) review for Monday. No recycling done.

And any chance you could spell my name correctly, it IS there under 20,000+ posts. :)
Nature 21st July 2007, 20:44 Quote
Oh, I see. I Just remember Mr. SWINburne's name written on the article...
provoko 21st July 2007, 20:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish
measure power usage of whole system with ssd in and then again with raptor and the seagate you used in the review

Yea, thats how it's usually done. Also test for heat on idle and load.

I was expecting these tests. Lots of people make silent PCs and HTPCs and are really hoping SSD draw little wattage and produce little heat, so knowing actual numbers would be nice.

Will you guys update the article?
Bindibadgi 21st July 2007, 20:54 Quote
They will be in the EPIA review.
leexgx 22nd July 2007, 07:21 Quote
PATA hard drives in laptops are far more commen then Sata disks

still why limit it to ata-66 them SD cards can most likey do more then that
Woodstock 22nd July 2007, 07:56 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by leexgx
PATA hard drives in laptops are far more commen then Sata disks

i was about to say that may new laptop still has an ata drive but i thought the 5400rpm speed would mean it wouldnt matter
Tim S 22nd July 2007, 12:46 Quote
virtually every new laptop that comes into our offices these days is SATA. I bought my ThinkPad X60s in March and that was SATA (and it's not a new Core 2 Duo-based ThinkPad; instead, it's a Core Duo). :)
Smilodon 22nd July 2007, 13:37 Quote
HP started with SATA discs about 2,5 years ago. (as standard) I believe IBM was a bit earlier.

Some cheaper laptop models might still use PATA, though.
completemadness 22nd July 2007, 17:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
And any chance you could spell my name correctly, it IS there under 20,000+ posts. :)
Isn't it above ? ;)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MR BUNGLE
- The laptop to standard PATA adaptor that I presume has been used would split the drive's connector to 40 pin IDE and a standard molex...
i think you could do that, and put an ammeter in the way, but then how would you test the normal HDD ? - as you would then need a 2.5" IDE drive to test again
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish
measure power usage of whole system with ssd in and then again with raptor and the seagate you used in the review
Sigh, that's hardly a scientific test at all, and its pretty damn hard to replicate the results, plus your assuming that the device they measure power usage with is very accurate, as it's probably about 1W difference

I just looked online, a 40gb 2.5 drive uses about 1.6W r/w, .5W idle, 0.2 W Standby, 0.1 Sleep
Samsung NAND HDD - 2.1W Active, 1.5W Idle, 0.2W Standby

Well now im confused, the NAND flash disc uses more power :s
http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/products/flash/Products_FlashSSD.html
http://www.fujitsu.com/us/services/computing/storage/hdd/mobile/mhv2120at.html

Edit
D'oh - i read the wrong column
0.5W Active, 0.1W Idle, 0.06W Standby

They are saying that a 2.5" HDD uses 2.1W active though, when the one i looked at is half a Watt lower
crazybob 22nd July 2007, 17:30 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Article
or if you’re upgrading a recent notebook make sure it’s SATA
Don't you mean make sure it's PATA?

Otherwise, a good article. I'm waiting eagerly to see faster versions in desktop form-factors, because they would make an excellent main drive in that case.
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