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Raspberry Pi review

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r3loaded 16th April 2012, 18:34 Quote
It might also be worth trying Arch Linux as that is typically on the bleeding edge - kernel 3.3 is already in the official repo. You could also squeeze a lot of performance out by compiling packages yourself (possibly using DistCC to do the heavy lifting on the main computer) and setting mtune parameters for the RPi. Ditto for the GPU driver.
ADJB 16th April 2012, 18:40 Quote
Quote:


Not sure it has enough power to support an emulator & game.
That said, try Oolite - a freeware Mac Os / Windows / Linux port of Elite. You'd need to compile it from source though.

A port of the FUSE Spectrum emulator is already up and running so given that there isn't a massive difference between a Speccy and a Beeb (or any of the other classic 8 bits) in terms of memory, overall power or game complexity then once the relevant emulators are ported I would be very surprised of the power of the Pi was an issue.
Madness_3d 16th April 2012, 18:56 Quote
Kinda glad I didn't get one now, will wait for a Raspberry Pi 2 and hope the whole platform is a bit more mature :)
lp rob1 16th April 2012, 19:08 Quote
Shame about the lack of Gigabit Ethernet. Would make the perfect file server if it had. Hopefully the Pi Foundation (read: Pie Base) will notice our comments and reflect with the Raspberry Pi 2.
blackadda15 16th April 2012, 19:50 Quote
Just got mine through the door let the experiments begin.
Neogumbercules 16th April 2012, 20:17 Quote
All I need to know is if there's a SNES emulator out there that will run on this thing.
RichCreedy 16th April 2012, 20:31 Quote
can i play angry birds on it?
tonyd223 16th April 2012, 21:28 Quote
OK, I'm old enough that I remember having a ZX81, I see the point of learning to program, but I'm just not sure of the relevance of this... I'll watch this space with interest, and it's so cheap I'd probably buy one anyway, but what would I use it for? I look forward to a dedicated projects page for inspiration
Fordy 16th April 2012, 21:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by vampalan
Does anyone whom is a secondary school student, or know of one, wish to own and do programming on one of these?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oSTHLvfzGM
Was watching the youtube about it, he mentioned cost as a barrier to learning computer programming, yet left out demand, as lots of programming jobs are out sourced to foreign places in big companies in the UK.

Yes. I'm a lower sixth student, pre-ordered one on release day.
Fordy 16th April 2012, 21:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madness_3d
Kinda glad I didn't get one now, will wait for a Raspberry Pi 2 and hope the whole platform is a bit more mature :)

Now where's the fun in that? :p
Sloth 16th April 2012, 21:47 Quote
Definitely want to pick one of these up. For the price there's just no reason not to, even if it's not some miracle machine. Thinking it would go well in a simple enclosure mounted to the side of an external USB hard drive. Hard drive plugs into one of the Pi's USB ports, a wireless KB+M plugs into the second, and assuming you can get decent video playback setup you've got a niftly little portable HTPC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fordy
Now where's the fun in that? :p
And more seriously, who's to say there'll be a Raspberry Pi 2?

It's a learning device first a foremost, and a modder's playground second. For the former not a lot of power or features are needed and most educational institutions aren't going to be looking for a new device now that they've already got one that meets their needs so developments of a Raspberry Pi 2 isn't exactly necessary. For the latter you're dealing with people who enjoy tinkering and making things work, the future of the device will depend largely on their work and creations as its limits and areas needing improvement are discovered.

TL;DR, if you want a Raspberry Pi 2 the best thing you can do is pick one of the first models up and have a go with it. It's cheap and you'll be supporting the creators.
Cupboard 16th April 2012, 22:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiNiMaL_FuSS
I'm interested in one as bit-torrent box, would I be able to use a USB hard drive alongside one, or is that asking too much?

Given that you can buy a NAS with a built in bit-torrent client for less than the cost of a Pi, which will work out of the box and look a lot neater, there isn't much of a need to IMO.

Not saying it wouldn't be cool though!

edit: first post in 11 months. Pi is awesome enough to have brought me back, despite the issues that made me leave :)
dark_avenger 17th April 2012, 03:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
Given that you can buy a NAS with a built in bit-torrent client for less than the cost of a Pi, which will work out of the box and look a lot neater, there isn't much of a need to IMO.

Not saying it wouldn't be cool though!

edit: first post in 11 months. Pi is awesome enough to have brought me back, despite the issues that made me leave :)

A NAS with bit torrent for less than $35? Seems unlikely....


Already pre ordered one to play around with. Mostly to play with the XBMC port but also looking into whole house audio using a few of them.
fluxtatic 17th April 2012, 05:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel OD
Must... Water Cool... It... :D

Didn't I already see someone here working on that?
ssj12 17th April 2012, 06:38 Quote
since i am a novice at this sort of thing, how is this powered?
badders 17th April 2012, 07:41 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluxtatic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel OD
Must... Water Cool... It... :D

Didn't I already see someone here working on that?

Yes, they stood a glass of water next to it.
Gareth Halfacree 17th April 2012, 07:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssj12
since i am a novice at this sort of thing, how is this powered?
It has a microUSB port. Just plug any old tablet or phone charger in and you're away - or use a powered USB hub. The whole thing runs on 5V 700mA, or 5V 500mA for the Model A (the Ethernet circuitry and integrated USB hub account for the extra 200mA.)

Well, I say 'any old charger,' but I found that it didn't like the charger for my HP TouchPad - which is odd, 'cos it's a 5V 2A model. Swapped it out for a 5V 1A I had lying around and all was well. Still haven't figured that one out...
MiNiMaL_FuSS 17th April 2012, 08:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dark_avenger
A NAS with bit torrent for less than $35? Seems unlikely....

This.

Happy to be proven wrong?
Guinevere 17th April 2012, 10:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmidtbag
Anyone who wants official updated Flash support on any platform is (for now) going to have to use Google Chrome

And is also a bit stuck in the past. Adobe have stated they will never again bring Flash to any new platforms and are basically on housekeeping duties for their existing releases.

Flash is now unnecessary, and it's just a matter of time before the HTML 5 toolchains catch up fully.
Gareth Halfacree 17th April 2012, 10:56 Quote
If you're anxious to get your hands on a Pi, Farnell has just re-opened pre-orders at just shy of £30 - and it's throwing a free T-shirt into the mix.

http://t.co/wI4624lm
murkle 17th April 2012, 12:38 Quote
Java works fine for me:
sudo apt-get install openjdk-6-jre
Blackshark 17th April 2012, 13:00 Quote
If you look at all the major NAS developers, gigabit (with actual proper gigabit 100MB/s speed) requires a huge amount more than most ARM processors can provide. However the RPi will provide enough bang to get you 10MB/s maybe top out the USB connection.

Thanks BT for the review.
TheKrumpet 17th April 2012, 13:36 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guinevere
And is also a bit stuck in the past. Adobe have stated they will never again bring Flash to any new platforms and are basically on housekeeping duties for their existing releases.

Flash is now unnecessary, and it's just a matter of time before the HTML 5 toolchains catch up fully.

I'm pretty sure that this was regarding mobile devices; do you have any evidence that the same is happening for desktop PCs?

Also, Flash isn't unnecessary, it's just now part of the Adobe AIR suite. It didn't die, it evolved.
Cupboard 17th April 2012, 20:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dark_avenger
A NAS with bit torrent for less than $35? Seems unlikely....

2 bay NAS with bit torrent: £45 (Zyxel from DABs, or you can have a D Link from scan for £50 which is what I have).

Raspberry Pi: £30, hard disk enclosure: £10. Total is £40 for one disk or £50 for two ignoring the cost of powering the Pi.

Cost difference is negligible, one is much neater than the other and doesn't require messing around.

Am I still going to buy a Pi? Yes, probably two, but getting one just for NAS purposes seems silly to me unless you want it to do something a bit different.
dark_avenger 18th April 2012, 01:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupboard
2 bay NAS with bit torrent: £45 (Zyxel from DABs, or you can have a D Link from scan for £50 which is what I have).

Raspberry Pi: £30, hard disk enclosure: £10. Total is £40 for one disk or £50 for two ignoring the cost of powering the Pi.

Cost difference is negligible, one is much neater than the other and doesn't require messing around.

Am I still going to buy a Pi? Yes, probably two, but getting one just for NAS purposes seems silly to me unless you want it to do something a bit different.


They have come down a bit since last time I looked then it seems.

Only advantage of using a Pi over a normal NAS is being able to run anything you like.

SABnzbd, Sickbeard and Couchpotato are all Python based so shouldn't be an issue to run on the Pi
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