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WiMAX Takes Off, But We'll Never Use It

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Jenny_Y8S 19th April 2010, 08:42 Quote
Nice tech, but not for us here in the UK
badders 19th April 2010, 08:51 Quote
Quote:
in real terms you’ll get 15Mbit/s for WiMAX and 3-4Mbit/s in HSDPA according to the techies I spoke to

*cries* - That's a little over 15x the fastest broadband speed I can get. 20-25x if you discount interleaving.
Unknownsock 19th April 2010, 09:08 Quote
I personally thinkg it would be a great technology to have here.
I mean look at our internets speeds? For example i pay for 24Mb, and i only receive about 20% of that due to my location.

If it lives up to the quoted speeds. That would be a massive increase for the majority of UK users, and we would save unneeded cash on line rentals. I would love to see the usage on line rentals nowdays, as most of us all have some sort of mobile contract?
ch424 19th April 2010, 09:32 Quote
In Europe we're going to get LTE or LTE Advanced so I'm really not bothered that we're not getting WiMAX!

From wikipedia:
Quote:

Peak download rates of 326.4 Mbit/s for 4x4 antennas, and 172.8 Mbit/s for 2x2 antennas (utilizing 20 MHz of spectrum).
Peak upload rates of 86.4 Mbit/s for every 20 MHz of spectrum using a single antenna.
Sub-5 ms latency for small IP packets
In the 900 MHz frequency band to be used in rural areas, supporting an optimal cell size of 5 km, 30 km sizes with reasonable performance, and up to 100 km cell sizes supported with acceptable performance. In city and urban areas, higher frequency bands (such as 2.6 GHz in EU) are used to support high speed mobile broadband. In this case, cell sizes may be 1 km or even less.
Co-existence with legacy standards (users can transparently start a call or transfer of data in an area using an LTE standard, and, should coverage be unavailable, continue the operation without any action on their part using GSM/GPRS or W-CDMA-based UMTS or even 3GPP2 networks such as cdmaOne or CDMA2000)

Sounds better than WiMAX in every way :) The only reason why a carrier would choose WiMAX is if they didn't have a GSM or UMTS network already.
Bindibadgi 19th April 2010, 10:28 Quote
LTE is interconvertable with standard GMA networks? Lovely! Obviously they'd never have such people at a WiMAX conference to give the opposite opinion though haha ;)
ch424 19th April 2010, 11:00 Quote
Alcatel GSM/UMTS cells support LTE via a firmware upgrade ;) I'm sure at least some other manufacturers have a similar capacity in their products.
Cupboard 19th April 2010, 14:16 Quote
You say they were demoing phone with this... HTC have one that is based on the Touch HD which looks quite nice, and that isn't WinMo6.1. You also showed a picture with it running on an Android phone?

And there have been WiMAX hotspots around in places for a while now, one of my friends had something around 2006 iirc, it was a USB box, powered externally, with what looked like a PCMIA card in it.

Meh, nice in principle but I doubt people will want yet another box to carry around.
StevenArnott 19th April 2010, 18:14 Quote
Interesting that you say WiMax is not being deployed here in the US. Within the last 6 months there has been a push here in Philadelphia by a company called 'Clear Wireless' for there installed WiMax coverage for Philadelphia and a number of other cities in the US.

http://www.clear.com/
HourBeforeDawn 19th April 2010, 19:44 Quote
Small land mass countries it wont be a big deal as its easier for running cable, but like in the USA where we have a lot of land mass and a lot of expense to try to wire it all, wimax is a nice promising option if it holds out to the specs and the greed of this country doesnt kick in and decide to screw over people.
dark_avenger 20th April 2010, 03:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by ch424
In Europe we're going to get LTE or LTE Advanced so I'm really not bothered that we're not getting WiMAX!

From wikipedia:


Sounds better than WiMAX in every way :) The only reason why a carrier would choose WiMAX is if they didn't have a GSM or UMTS network already.


There starting testing on LTE here in australia now.
Hopefully will be abit better than the current 3G network
LaM3a 20th April 2010, 18:05 Quote
I know there is Wimax in Brussels (by Clearwire : http://www.astel.be/Internet-via-Wimax-a-Bruxelles old article, ut I don't know the current situation ) and it seems very easy to use :-)
fernblatt 21st April 2010, 01:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenArnott
Interesting that you say WiMax is not being deployed here in the US. Within the last 6 months there has been a push here in Philadelphia by a company called 'Clear Wireless' for there installed WiMax coverage for Philadelphia and a number of other cities in the US.

http://www.clear.com/


I'm in the SouthEast US and had ClearWire service for a couple years, but tech support was fairly horrid and as more folks signed up, available bandwidth went down to the point of almost being unusable. (3G data was faster at that point!) I switched to AT&T's fiber-based wideband service and have been quite happy since.

Apparently they were more interested in user numbers than they were in providing infrastructure support. Fairly common in the US with all wireless providers. Oddly enough AT&T is supposed to be the worst of the lot, but I've had very good service, both 3G mobile and fiber home service.

The post above made a good point about service in the US vs the EU and other smaller areas with a more dense population. It's not very practical to cover 100% of the US simply because of the high percentage of non-populated areas. I'm not sure how it's done in AU, they seem to be able to do a somewhat better job at providing wireless data and voice.

Cheers

Tom
Culinia 26th April 2010, 12:46 Quote
Wireless sucks.
Bad for latency.
'nuff said.
CrisEdinburgh 11th October 2010, 22:54 Quote
I have just come back from spending a year in Japan and can report that Wi-Max has now been rolled out in every one of the major conurbations where it is providing stiff competition to rival ADSL and cable services. Contact the provider and you are up and running within 24 hours using a compact USB dongle that is only about twice the size of a memory stick. Download speeds are excellent. It is particularly popular with students and others living in only temporary rented accommodation. And if it has not yet reached you, an online map shows you the progress of the network as it is being rolled out across the country. I do not know why the Japanese can make a success of this where others cannot, but it is certainly an example to be closely watched.
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