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MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Gaming X 11G Review

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supermuchurios 16th May 2017, 19:26 Quote
Would you feel a little short changed in getting perhaps sub 30FPS in Deus Ex @ 4K resolutions having spent this much and a whole lot more on a system that would do this card 'justice'?
Dogbert666 16th May 2017, 21:01 Quote
Perhaps, but what else you gonna do?
Anfield 16th May 2017, 21:49 Quote
Blame Squealix rather than the hardware?
supermuchurios 16th May 2017, 22:09 Quote
Buy a console and a big telly and have done with the PC arms race?
MightyBenihana 16th May 2017, 23:49 Quote
RGB but covered in red. Makes sense. It has become a box to tick rather than a design element.
Sentinel-R1 17th May 2017, 08:10 Quote
Where's the Inno 3D and Asus 1080 Ti's in the graphs?

You've already got the figures for them here:https://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/graphics/2017/04/11/asus-geforce-gtx-1080-ti-rog-strix-review/1
Wakka 17th May 2017, 08:24 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by MightyBenihana
RGB but covered in red. Makes sense. It has become a box to tick rather than a design element.

Always bothered me about the Gaming X cards... Why don't they make them fit in with their high end Carbon motherboards? A nice understated look, a touch of faux carbon weave here and there, then the RGB lighting would make sense.
perplekks45 17th May 2017, 08:29 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by supermuchurios
Buy a console and a big telly and have done with the PC arms race?

Oh, you mean like Sony and Microsoft are done with their race? Which is why they release a PS4 Pro and Scorpio, respectively. To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.
supermuchurios 17th May 2017, 08:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Oh, you mean like Sony and Microsoft are done with their race? Which is why they release a PS4 Pro and Scorpio, respectively. To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.

I meant the costs kid.
Sentinel-R1 17th May 2017, 08:58 Quote
^ kid?... Condescending much?

Plus buying a console and a 'big telly' would cost more than the 1080Ti... (my idea of a big telly is 55" plus) :)
supermuchurios 17th May 2017, 10:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel-R1
^ kid?... Condescending much?

Plus buying a console and a 'big telly' would cost more than the 1080Ti... (my idea of a big telly is 55" plus) :)

Condescending like this part:-
To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.

Yes a 1080Ti would be less than a big telly but not the rest of the system.
What are you going to include? Costs for your sofa and Doritos?
Sentinel-R1 17th May 2017, 10:39 Quote
For a supposed PC enthusiast on a PC enthusiast site, you're not very enthusiastic ;)
perplekks45 17th May 2017, 11:51 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by supermuchurios
Condescending like this part:-
To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.

Yes a 1080Ti would be less than a big telly but not the rest of the system.
What are you going to include? Costs for your sofa and Doritos?

If that's condescending to you you should probably stay away from large parts of the internet.
Also, if anything I meant to attack Sony and MS for their brilliant idea of halving console release cycles with slightly better versions of their current consoles after 2-3 years. And then they give you "Dynamic 4K Gaming" which is not real 4K gaming.

But back to topic: Joining the ranks of console players will get you out of the arms race for a bit, yes. It will not, at least that's what I think, get you out of it completely and forever.
[ZiiP] NaloaC 17th May 2017, 11:59 Quote
I'm humming and hawing between this card and the EVGA FTW3 model.

It's splitting hairs really, but would like to be able to compare them from BT reviews.
Gareth Halfacree 17th May 2017, 12:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Oh, you mean like Sony and Microsoft are done with their race? Which is why they release a PS4 Pro and Scorpio, respectively. To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.
Hey, at least it's not like back in the day. When I first got started in gaming, you were lucky if you got a solid three years out of 'em. ZX80: 1980. ZX81: 1981. ZX Spectrum: 1982. Master System: 1985 (Japan, 1986 US and 1987 Europe). Mega Drive: 1988 (Japan, 1989 US and 1990 Europe). Mega CD: 1991 (Japan, 1992 US and 1993 Europe). 32X: 1994 (Japan and US, 1995 Europe). Saturn: 1994 (Japan, 1995 US and Europe). Dreamcast: 1998 (Japan, 1999 US and Europe.)

So, if you started out with a ZX80 you replaced it the next year and the year after that, then you had three years before you fancied a Master System, another three before you upgraded to a Mega Drive, three years before you were convinced that Multimedia Is The Future and added a Mega CD to it, another three before you picked up the 32X 'cos it turns out cartridges are better than single-speed CD-ROMs, then a Saturn that same year after you figured out the 32X was a dead duck, then four years before you picked up the Dreamcast only to see Sega drop down dead.

And by 'you,' I mean 'me,' except I skipped the 32X. Not 'cos I knew it was going to be a flop, I just couldn't afford it at the time.

Five year lifecycle? Luxury!

(Although if you cut your teeth on the Nintendo side of the fence, you had things better: NES in 1983, SNES didn't land for another seven years in 1990, then you had six years to wait for the Nintendo 64 in 1996, then another six for the GameCube in 2001, then five for the Wii in 2006 though at least your GameCube games were compatible with it. Just to finish the list off: another five for the Wii U announcement in 2011 though you couldn't buy it until 2012, then the Switch was unveiled four years later in 2016 and launched this year bringing us to the modern five-year cycle.)
Anfield 17th May 2017, 12:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
Which is why they release a PS4 Pro and Scorpio, respectively. To show their commitment to 5-year cycles of one iteration of console hardware without artificial in-between steps? Yeah.... thought so.

Who cares if they release new consoles? Provided they keep games backwards compatible for more than one iteration it doesn't hurt anyone if those who jump on the bandwagon later get faster hardware.

Although I would have preferred it if Sony would have at least fixed the issues with the noise of the construction site optical drive
tonyd223 17th May 2017, 12:46 Quote
really? if this was a pub and not a forum...
perplekks45 18th May 2017, 09:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anfield
Who cares if they release new consoles? Provided they keep games backwards compatible for more than one iteration it doesn't hurt anyone if those who jump on the bandwagon later get faster hardware.

Although I would have preferred it if Sony would have at least fixed the issues with the noise of the construction site optical drive

There is always backwards compatibility in PC gaming. Granted, it will run like .... :p

And Sony doesn't have the greatest track record of offering backwards compatibility with their consoles. At least not in the US or EU.

If this was a pub we'd all have a pint and a laugh.

@ Gareth: thanks for the detailed history lesson, I learned something today. ;)
Anfield 18th May 2017, 11:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by perplekks45
There is always backwards compatibility in PC gaming. Granted, it will run like .... :p

And Sony doesn't have the greatest track record of offering backwards compatibility with their consoles. At least not in the US or EU.

Ironically the backwards compatibility is often worse with "newer" games, god I hate those stupid Gamespy and GFWL prompts.

Indeed, although I don't see any objective reason other than their own ignorance for it, Sony could make approximately all the money if they made a gog.com clone that sells PS1 & PS2 era games.
Yadda 18th May 2017, 13:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gareth Halfacree
Hey, at least it's not like back in the day. When I first got started in gaming, you were lucky if you got a solid three years out of 'em. ZX80: 1980. ZX81: 1981. ZX Spectrum: 1982. Master System: 1985 (Japan, 1986 US and 1987 Europe). Mega Drive: 1988 (Japan, 1989 US and 1990 Europe). Mega CD: 1991 (Japan, 1992 US and 1993 Europe). 32X: 1994 (Japan and US, 1995 Europe). Saturn: 1994 (Japan, 1995 US and Europe). Dreamcast: 1998 (Japan, 1999 US and Europe.)

So, if you started out with a ZX80 you replaced it the next year and the year after that, then you had three years before you fancied a Master System, another three before you upgraded to a Mega Drive, three years before you were convinced that Multimedia Is The Future and added a Mega CD to it, another three before you picked up the 32X 'cos it turns out cartridges are better than single-speed CD-ROMs, then a Saturn that same year after you figured out the 32X was a dead duck, then four years before you picked up the Dreamcast only to see Sega drop down dead.

And by 'you,' I mean 'me,' except I skipped the 32X. Not 'cos I knew it was going to be a flop, I just couldn't afford it at the time.

Five year lifecycle? Luxury!

(Although if you cut your teeth on the Nintendo side of the fence, you had things better: NES in 1983, SNES didn't land for another seven years in 1990, then you had six years to wait for the Nintendo 64 in 1996, then another six for the GameCube in 2001, then five for the Wii in 2006 though at least your GameCube games were compatible with it. Just to finish the list off: another five for the Wii U announcement in 2011 though you couldn't buy it until 2012, then the Switch was unveiled four years later in 2016 and launched this year bringing us to the modern five-year cycle.)

I remember it well. I was about 9 when the zx81 came out and my best friend at the time had one for Christmas (or rather his family bought one for the household, but as far as we were concerned it was his :D). I held-off for a couple more years and saved up for a Commodore 64.

My '64 lasted me through to the late 80's when I bought an A500, and my friend ditched his zx81 in favour of a CPC464 somewhere along the line but things were different back then: the emphasis was on computing rather than computers, and the lust for the latest hardware wasn't nearly as strong as it is today, where manufacturers have made upgrading a competitive sport in its own right.
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