bit-tech.net

Zalman FX100 Cube Review

Comments 1 to 24 of 24

Reply
Diellur 8th March 2013, 16:38 Quote
Interesting review...I wonder what the result would be like after a few hours gaming, where the GPU is venting hot air into the case too. That delta-T is a little too close to the TjMax for comfort, IMHO.
jrs77 8th March 2013, 17:06 Quote
There's so much £50 low-noise tower-coolers out there, that this cooler seems rather pointless. A £25 CM Hyper 212 Evo with an inaudible fan @ 800RPM offers better results aswell.

Additionally, at this pricetag you could aswell get a monster like the Prolimatech Genesis with 2x inaudible 140mm fans running at 500 RPM.
tad2008 8th March 2013, 17:09 Quote
Considering it is completely fanless and still achieves some pretty good results makes me wonder what the results would be strapping a quite high air flow fan to it.
GuilleAcoustic 8th March 2013, 17:13 Quote
It'd be interesting to see temps with the heatsink mounted vertically (like inside a bitfenix prodigy). Plus, the prodigy front fan would be blowing directly at it ...
jrs77 8th March 2013, 17:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
It'd be interesting to see temps with the heatsink mounted vertically (like inside a bitfenix prodigy). Plus, the prodigy front fan would be blowing directly at it ...

Hexus did test Silverstones Heligon HE-02, which is a big passive cooler aswell.. http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/cooling/46265-silverstone-heligon-he02/

These passive fans are really not designed for being used with fans and are rather underwhelming with added fans given their sheer size.
Asouter 8th March 2013, 18:16 Quote
I wouldn't be able to resist buying a hamster ....I know it'd be cruel but it's add some interest to the case :D
djzic 8th March 2013, 19:46 Quote
I would imagine this would be pretty good after delidding the i5 and putting in some proper TIM...
Corky42 8th March 2013, 23:03 Quote
I know the idea of this is to be passive, but as it can take a 90mm fan it would have been nice to see the results of fitting something like a Nexus undervolted to 5 or 7V
lehtv 9th March 2013, 06:04 Quote
I would've liked to see results against Thermalright HR-02, mainly because it's designed for passive operation and costs about half of the Zalman. It was originally released without a fan, only later they introduced the Macho moniker and included a TY-140 in the package.
stupido 9th March 2013, 14:14 Quote
I was quite tempted to buy the HR-02/Macho but I ended up having Archon + extra TY-140...
According all reviews I have read, my current setup is better performing while keeping similar noise signature (due to usage of TY-140) buuuttt... Archon is quite tall (175mm with fans) so I barely closed the side panel on my case...
blackworx 9th March 2013, 15:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by lehtv
I would've liked to see results against Thermalright HR-02, mainly because it's designed for passive operation and costs about half of the Zalman. It was originally released without a fan, only later they introduced the Macho moniker and included a TY-140 in the package.

Me too; I'm currently running an HR-02 fanless on a moderately OC'd i5-3570K with a single top mounted Noctua NF-12 on exhaust duties and a passively cooled HD7750 in the box too. As a setup it works well; CPU idles around 34ºC, passes Prime95+Furmark torture test without going into crazy temps, although the Noctua does need to spin up quite a bit for that. Under normal use including gaming the fan runs as slow as it'll go without stalling, which, according to SpeedFan, is about 540RPM. The whole system is inaudible and that's with the tower on the desk about 0.5m from my head.

Obviously I'm not in the market to switch from the HR-02 but I'd love to know how it compares to these more costly coolers.
John_T 9th March 2013, 16:17 Quote
I'm still using my i7 950, (which I can't see the point of upgrading anytime soon) so at a TDP of 130W this is all a bit of a moot point to me at the moment, BUT, I reckon my next major overhaul will probably see me go fanless, so it's still interesting.

I really like the sound of blackworx's set-up, (is that the Sapphire Ultimate your using?) as that's definitely the direction I want to take in future.

I'd love to see how powerful a fully passive PC could be - something like this cooler with the passive 7750 and maybe a Seasonic Platinum fanless PSU. Picking the right case would be tricky though. I'd love to build it but would be frightened of frying everything after 6 months or so...
Jipa 10th March 2013, 06:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
I'm still using my i7 950, (which I can't see the point of upgrading anytime soon) so at a TDP of 130W this is all a bit of a moot point to me at the moment, BUT, I reckon my next major overhaul will probably see me go fanless, so it's still interesting.

I really like the sound of blackworx's set-up, (is that the Sapphire Ultimate your using?) as that's definitely the direction I want to take in future.

I'd love to see how powerful a fully passive PC could be - something like this cooler with the passive 7750 and maybe a Seasonic Platinum fanless PSU. Picking the right case would be tricky though. I'd love to build it but would be frightened of frying everything after 6 months or so...

I just don't see the point. Build a powerful PC without fans and it's always going to be just a matter of time before something goes. It isn't just the CPU and GPU cores that need cooling...

I also wonder how quiet houses are around the world, a couple of quiet fans just aren't going to make any difference to the ambient noise level.
Corky42 10th March 2013, 12:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
I also wonder how quiet houses are around the world, a couple of quiet fans just aren't going to make any difference to the ambient noise level.

Not every house has noise poulution, especialy at night.
Some people aim for totaly silent (passive), for others adding a few undervoleted fans is enough to retain there sanity.
Jipa 10th March 2013, 15:23 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corky42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
I also wonder how quiet houses are around the world, a couple of quiet fans just aren't going to make any difference to the ambient noise level.

Not every house has noise poulution, especialy at night.
Some people aim for totaly silent (passive), for others adding a few undervoleted fans is enough to retain there sanity.

Sure, some people live in the middle of nowhere and have absolutely no electric appliances in the house, let alone central heating.

Still my point is that no (powerful) passive system is going to have a long lifespan. It's the small, single components that are going to fail in heat, not the GPU or CPU cores.

Have fun trying, I just don't see that happening and really can't see the point in even trying! If you want to go passive 24/7, just get a Raspberry. If you want a gaming rig 24/7 you're both rather silly and should be expecting some unnoticeable fan noise.
papalarge123 10th March 2013, 16:19 Quote
i love the fact u have decided to review a cooler designed for noiseless usage then stick a fan behind it at the back of the case,
doesnt that then eliminate the need for a silent cooler, with that one fan on the back, u might as well have added 2 more fans to help the cooling,
also it eliminates the values of ur own review, because a silent cooler would be used in a case desined to be silent, which would mean no fans at all, which would again add more temp to the CPU,
John_T 10th March 2013, 21:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa

Sure, some people live in the middle of nowhere and have absolutely no electric appliances in the house, let alone central heating.

Still my point is that no (powerful) passive system is going to have a long lifespan. It's the small, single components that are going to fail in heat, not the GPU or CPU cores.

Have fun trying, I just don't see that happening and really can't see the point in even trying! If you want to go passive 24/7, just get a Raspberry. If you want a gaming rig 24/7 you're both rather silly and should be expecting some unnoticeable fan noise.

You don't have to live in the middle of nowhere and have no electrical appliances in your house to appreciate the attractions a silent PC - I don't really understand that argument. If I'm working in my study, what difference does it make to me if my fridge-freezer powers up in my kitchen? It's in a different room, I can't hear it, it's irrelevant. My PC is right next to me - if that makes a noise while I'm working or writing in silence, I hear it.

As for a 'reasonably' powerful passive PC not having a long lifespan - that was the point I was trying to make - ie, exactly how powerful could it be made and still have the legs for a normal lifespan?

I wasn't suggesting a balls-to-the-wall powerhouse machine - but one that's capable for most things, ie, work, photo & video editing and gaming on a single, 1080p resolution monitor. To suggest someone should have either a powerful gaming machine or a Raspberry Pi is just daft, there's tons of scope for a machine that sits somewhere in the middle and with the major benefits of both.

I don't understand saying there's no point in even trying, if it's not worth trying, then why is anything else we read or do in here?
Corky42 11th March 2013, 00:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jipa
Still my point is that no (powerful) passive system is going to have a long lifespan. It's the small, single components that are going to fail in heat, not the GPU or CPU cores.

You realy need to look into pasive PC's before making such an uneducatated statment.

I could buy a fully pasive PC of the shelf with a 3 year warranty, a Core i7 3770K, Radeon HD 7750.

The small components would only suffer if you build the encloseure to not allow the natural air flow to work to your advantage i.e using convection.
http://www.quietpc.com/nof-cs-70
[USRF]Obiwan 11th March 2013, 12:10 Quote
You should test with a complete silent/passive PC: Including video card, PSU and case.

There is absolutely no sense (or use) to be using one passive cooler inside a system were the PSU, GPU and case are actively cooled by fans.
Skippylee 11th March 2013, 16:02 Quote
What is the point using cases fans with a fanless CPU cooler? And then you compare them with fanned heatsinks and water coolers. :o

The only comments worth reading here are from Corky42 and [USRF]Obiwan.
Jimbob 12th March 2013, 16:26 Quote
Erm, yeah it may be fanless but it is so bloody big it's pretty much on the case mounted fan anyway! Coupled with the fact that you tested with 3 case fans running I doubt you would even notice another slow running one.

I suspect if you turned the case fans off so it was truly silent you could add significantly to those temps.
John_T 12th March 2013, 23:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippylee


The only comments worth reading here are from Corky42 and [USRF]Obiwan.

Sorry mate, I'll try and do better next time... :)
blackworx 18th March 2013, 22:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippylee
What is the point using cases fans with a fanless CPU cooler?
The heat still needs to be exhausted from the case; 99% of the time you can't rely on convection. As with everything it's a question of balance. I run a case exhaust because it means my rig is (effectively) silent when idling/browsing but it's also capable of dealing with the excess heat for more intensive stuff - Lightroom/games/transcoding. There is literally no point in not having that case fan. If you take it away you're just left with a machine that suffers runaway temps at the first sign of any workload in return for zero benefit noise-wise.
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
I really like the sound of blackworx's set-up, (is that the Sapphire Ultimate your using?)
Thanks - yes it is. Very nice card if a little niche. Overpriced for its performance too unless you value high quality passive cooling solutions and that heatsink is top notch. It's helped by the 7750's already low temps/power consumption, but I can't get the GPU over 77ºC in Furmark. Compared to the HD4850+Accelero it replaced, it's a piece of cake to work with in a low airflow case. That 4850 was a bitch to cool - died on its arse a couple of times after a few hours' solid gaming.
Skippylee 8th April 2013, 12:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackworx
The heat still needs to be exhausted from the case; 99% of the time you can't rely on convection. As with everything it's a question of balance. I run a case exhaust because it means my rig is (effectively) silent when idling/browsing but it's also capable of dealing with the excess heat for more intensive stuff - Lightroom/games/transcoding. There is literally no point in not having that case fan. If you take it away you're just left with a machine that suffers runaway temps at the first sign of any workload in return for zero benefit noise-wise.

I agree that the heat still needs to be exhausted, but if the aim is to have a totally silent PC (with no fans) then it is extremely important that the chassis used must allow the heat to naturally dissipate. If you look at the chassis' Quiet PC use in their silent PCs you'll see that they have plenty of ventilation holes, albeit they are a little ugly. But then again the most important part is that it is totally silent.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums