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Noctua NH-C12P CPU Cooler Review

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Dreaming 1st July 2009, 12:26 Quote
God I can't even bring myself to look at CPU HSF reviews anymore because they're all so pricey.

We need someone to invent one made of cheap material or something that costs £1.50 and still cools pretty well, then I'd be happy. Unless you are seriously overclocking who can afford these intricate lumps of metal for £50+ for the sole purpose of keeping your CPU cool? That's half the price of an average graphics card.
p3n 1st July 2009, 12:30 Quote
90 degrees? (then 180?)
Dave_M 1st July 2009, 15:01 Quote
Why does it have those gaping holes? Looks like they ran out of metal.


"copper is good at conducting and holding heat but not as optimal as aluminium at expending it into the air". That's not right. Aluminium is used because copper is very expensive and heavy. With aluminium, since you can afford more of it you can make a nice, big heatsink. It would perform better than the equivalent cost in copper.

Also, the nickel plating will stop the copper turning into copper oxide from just being in contact with the air. I suppose you could lap the heatsink to get it back to the pure copper layer. It would perform better but I doubt it's really worth it.
Bindibadgi 1st July 2009, 15:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_M
Why does it have those gaping holes? Looks like they ran out of metal.


"copper is good at conducting and holding heat but not as optimal as aluminium at expending it into the air". That's not right. Aluminium is used because copper is very expensive and heavy. With aluminium, since you can afford more of it you can make a nice, big heatsink. It would perform better than the equivalent cost in copper.

Also, the nickel plating will stop the copper turning into copper oxide from just being in contact with the air. I suppose you could lap the heatsink to get it back to the pure copper layer. It would perform better but I doubt it's really worth it.

Copper holds (specific heat capacity) and conducts heat better, but it doesn't give it up as well as aluminium - that's why heatsinks with copper cores and alu fins work as a great combination. (Anyone else remember the copper cored Taisol?)
DXR_13KE 1st July 2009, 15:50 Quote
Its shape looks like one of those thermalright xp-90 coolers.
Ransoman 1st July 2009, 17:29 Quote
Is this Cooler new? I am sure i have been using this cooler in my machine for a year now. Surprised to see such a late review.
HourBeforeDawn 1st July 2009, 17:55 Quote
ya you guys are about a year to late on the review front for this cpu, still one of the better choices for low profile cases and HTPC machines but still a bit late.
The boy 4rm oz 1st July 2009, 18:20 Quote
Looks like a pretty good cooler for the AMD systems, Noctua have superb build quality so if Iwas going AMD I would not think twice about considering this cooler.
SMIFFYDUDE 1st July 2009, 20:55 Quote
Why do they keep using the flesh and dried blood outside a Weatherspoons colour scheme. Its nasty.
Ransoman 2nd July 2009, 09:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by HourBeforeDawn
ya you guys are about a year to late on the review front for this cpu, still one of the better choices for low profile cases and HTPC machines but still a bit late.

I don't think so, it is HUGE.
HourBeforeDawn 8th July 2009, 02:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ransoman
Quote:
Originally Posted by HourBeforeDawn
ya you guys are about a year to late on the review front for this cpu, still one of the better choices for low profile cases and HTPC machines but still a bit late.

I don't think so, it is HUGE.

I do think so, its in three of my HTPC Cases, a Thermaltake Lanbox, Thermaltake Digital Home Series, and a Aerocool M80.
Monkey Puzzle 8th July 2009, 03:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindibadgi
Copper holds (specific heat capacity) and conducts heat better, but it doesn't give it up as well as aluminium - that's why heatsinks with copper cores and alu fins work as a great combination. (Anyone else remember the copper cored Taisol?)

I'm afraid you're wrong there - it's an old myth that aluminium is better at 'giving up' heat than copper, and copper better at taking up heat. That myth is like saying "a pipe or wire has a certain resistance in one direction, but a different resistance in the other".

The reason they used copper cores and aluminium fins was/is a compromise between using the more expensive, heavier and less easily machinable copper (with its better heat conductance), and the light, cheap and easy to form aluminium.
thehippoz 8th July 2009, 04:36 Quote
what I learned welding tig.. aluminum heats evenly unlike copper- the heat will spread across the entire piece faster than copper which makes it perfect for cooling fins
gdawg304 16th July 2009, 13:11 Quote
Erm...I've had one of these for just over a year now, on an overclocked Core 2 Quad 9450 (running at 3GHz up from 2.66)

Be interesting to know your ambient temperatures because even when gaming my processor rarely breaks 50C, and only breaks 60 when running an overclocking stress test.

But according to your tests on the Intel processor you get a delta-T of 54C? so even in a chilly room at 10C you're easily getting hotter than my processor does in quite a warm room!

Not sure about the test CPU's maximum safe temperature but if mine hit 70+ degrees C under load I'd be concerned!

will admit the Noctua was very nicely machined with no sharp edges - when removing my old Zalman cooler i did a nice job of slicing my knuckles on the copper fins!
mattmacdonald 1st April 2010, 04:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by HourBeforeDawn
I do think so, its in three of my HTPC Cases, a Thermaltake Lanbox, Thermaltake Digital Home Series, and a Aerocool M80.

How did you get it to fit in the lanbox? I'm presuming you removed the fan?
Or did you find some sort of low-profile power supply?

I have a lanbox and would LOVE to put one of these things in it, but am worried it won't fit...
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