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Watercooling 101

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Darv 22nd August 2007, 12:42 Quote
Nice guide. A couple of things I noticed though. From what I could see you've not mentioned anything about bleeding the loop. That's where a res will become extremely useful and would be best placed at the top of the loop, or in a position where it can be roatated to the top. Makes bleeding the system much easier IMO.

Another "low flow" block that I would mention is the NexXxos XP. It performs very well in both low flow and high flow systems. (And the gold plated version is damn sexy )
revlob 22nd August 2007, 12:50 Quote
Great guide chaps!
Ramble 22nd August 2007, 13:07 Quote
Nice one.
BTW Carbon nanotubes have a TC of 6000, so make your blocks out of that.
MilkMan5 22nd August 2007, 13:07 Quote
Very informative - thx bit-tech.
Delphium 22nd August 2007, 13:32 Quote
Yet another great article :D
Got me thinking about how I could change something in my loop to increase performace :)
capnPedro 22nd August 2007, 13:40 Quote
Awesome article; good to see bit returning to its modding routes.
thEcat 22nd August 2007, 13:49 Quote
Just time for a quick read through. First impression is of an excellent article, not to techi, not to vague and sufficiently wide coverage of the important areas. :)
lamboman 22nd August 2007, 14:10 Quote
Great article, nice and simple!
Almightyrastus 22nd August 2007, 14:22 Quote
Grrr got halfway through reading that during my lunch break and now the server cand find the article. Was very good up to that point though.

Yay it's there again, and just enough time left on lunch to finish reading it.
Da_Rude_Baboon 22nd August 2007, 14:58 Quote
lolz this could degenerate into a 'thats not a loop, this is a loop!' contest pretty quickly.

Great article Bit although i agree with Darv that a reservoir makes bleeding the loop a lot easier.
timmythemonkey 22nd August 2007, 14:58 Quote
Nice article, though as mentioned on the first page its the £££ thats prevented me from taking the plunge... maybe i'll just put my pc in a beer fridge instead, would be cheaper and condensation cant be THAT harmful
Bindibadgi 22nd August 2007, 15:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Almightyrastus
Grrr got halfway through reading that during my lunch break and now the server cand find the article. Was very good up to that point though.

Yay it's there again, and just enough time left on lunch to finish reading it.

Sorry I had to change it from hardware to modding :)

EDIT: No, I was right in the first place: it was hardware
Firehed 22nd August 2007, 15:19 Quote
Looks like a great start to a series here. The question here is whether Brett finishes up before I have access to my gear again - I think those fittings were still wet when I sent them off ;)
The_Pope 22nd August 2007, 16:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnPedro
Awesome article; good to see bit returning to its modding routes.

Wait til you see what's coming ;)
ralph.pickering 22nd August 2007, 18:07 Quote
It is possible to get below ambient temps using watercooling... by including an evaporative cooling tower in your loop. Of course you constantly need to top up the water in the system, but hey, who said mods ever needed to be practical. It also helps if you live in a dry climate, unlike the UK at the moment.
OdDBaLL_MoD 22nd August 2007, 18:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Pope
Wait til you see what's coming ;)

Now thats what i like to hear!
Mathmarauder 22nd August 2007, 18:31 Quote
Very nice guide, thanks for taking the time to put this together. ;)
wafflesomd 22nd August 2007, 19:18 Quote
I sent this to my friend. He has more money than sense.

He had no idea what he was doing, bought an entire DD set, and bought the wrong sized tubing. Didn't get any clamps.

After he had it all put together, he realized he had no idea what he was doing. He made the loop far to long. The pump couldn't even push the coolant through the loop.

Maybe he'll learn something from this.
automagsrock 22nd August 2007, 19:29 Quote
When I try and go to page three or four it tells me the page does not exist on the server o.0

I really want to read this too, I am wanting to WC my PC this fall :(
supermonkey 22nd August 2007, 19:32 Quote
Nice article. It's nice to see a fairly comprehensive guide to watercooling.

I do want to address one of the initial points in favor of watercooling:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Article
Water is quieter: A slow-spinning 120mm fan on a copper radiator will do a better job, while freeing up trapped PCI or PCIe 1x slots.
I see this point made in just about every watercooling guide, but I think it's a little misleading. If you're using watercooling to replace the fans on those beefy graphics cards, coupled with a power-hungry processor, you're going to need more than just a single, slow-spinning 120mm fan. You'll probably need 2 fans, both of them spinning fast enough to push a decent amount of air across the radiator. Add another fan or two for the passive components (hard drives, northbridge, etc.) and at least one more for the power supply, and the total number of fans is no less than when you started with air cooling.

A couple months ago, I was considering a watercooling loop, and silence was one of my main reasons/concerns. After my research, I found that with decent cable routing to aid the air flow, I can run my processor and graphics card at comfortable settings with fewer fans than would have been necessary with watercooling. By slowing the fan speeds, my system is now almost silent, runs cool enough, and not a drop of water was used.

I can see where watercooling can be attractive. Better overclocking, the l33t factor, even lower temps; these are all fine reasons. But with components putting out more heat nowadays, silence isn't really guaranteed with watercooling. At least, it's no more silent than a well thought out air cooling setup.

-monkey
The_Beast 22nd August 2007, 20:09 Quote
pretty good 101
Kipman725 22nd August 2007, 20:34 Quote
I tried water cooling and it wasn't for me and I can't understand why anyone but the most dedicated overclocker or no noise person would want it. With air cooling you can remove enough heat with good coolers and case cooling from the most high end components even when overclocked to quite high levels with almost silence if you know what your doing. But with water cooling your faced with leaks and most annoying a system you are unable to easily able to tinker with as it's full of tubes! (no more just quikly installing anything... evey job is suddenly at least 3hrs long while you replumb)...
For me water cooling was a big waste of money and someting which I wish I had thought about abit mroe before trying it.
TNash 22nd August 2007, 20:42 Quote
Great guide! I didn't really understand how everything pieced together before that. I just might try water cooling on my next case.
Nexxo 22nd August 2007, 20:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kipman725
I tried water cooling and it wasn't for me and I can't understand why anyone but the most dedicated overclocker or no noise person would want it. With air cooling you can remove enough heat with good coolers and case cooling from the most high end components even when overclocked to quite high levels with almost silence if you know what your doing. But with water cooling your faced with leaks and most annoying a system you are unable to easily able to tinker with as it's full of tubes! (no more just quikly installing anything... evey job is suddenly at least 3hrs long while you replumb)...
For me water cooling was a big waste of money and someting which I wish I had thought about abit mroe before trying it.

As with everything, YMMV. A well-designed aircooled system can certainly hold its own against a watercooled system (although not outcompete it). If you build a watercooled unit well, you shouldn't have to worry about leaks and the loop should not get in the way of any tinkering.
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