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Intel Core i7-7700K, Core i5-7600K (Kaby Lake) and Z270 Chipset Review

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Harlequin 4th January 2017, 16:14 Quote
my Z68 can boot with it from uefi - but then again it does support pcie3 and IB

on a related note I love arstechnica`s headline
Quote:
With identical performance to Skylake, Intel brings desktop performance to a standstill.
DrTiCool 4th January 2017, 16:41 Quote
what I know Z77 has no support for Nvme
TheMadDutchDude 4th January 2017, 16:43 Quote
Skylake to Kabylake is nothing more than a Bloomfield C1 to D0 stepping change - enhancing OC and bringing down heat. Intel are well and truly stagnated. :)

Also, Z68 does NOT support NVMe out of the box, nor does X79. I fail to see why people go for AHCI devices in M.2 slots when it's still a slow, backwards technology. NVMe is what belongs in there.
maverik-sg1 4th January 2017, 16:52 Quote
Question about RAM slots and overclocking (to reach the assumed norm of 4.8-5.1 ghz nothing extreme)

Does skylake and/or Kaby allow for this even with 4 slots full.

Reason I ask - if I buy 16gb of DDR4 (2x8gb) and want to upgrade to 32GB later, can I just use two additional (identical ofc) DIMMS and expect my overclock to remain (for sake or discussion lets say CPU does 5ghz prime stable @ 1,35v but I run at 4.8Ghz @ 1.3v

Looking ahead - do we know if (Ry)Zen OC's with 4 DIMMS?
play_boy_2000 4th January 2017, 17:17 Quote
Intel has completely gone off the rails with regards to the enthusiast market. Nearly half the bloody die space is taken up by a feature that's immediately turned off.

Socket 2011 is stupid (and expensive), so Intel really needs to figure out a new socket that dumps the GPU and associated output pins in favor of 8 cores, 24 PCIe lanes (for sli/xfire or stupidly fast NVMe SSDs), 64GB max memory and toss in 5 gigabit ethernet, just for fun. Wrap it all up into an entry level server and enthusiast platform, and you have a winner.
TheMadDutchDude 4th January 2017, 17:24 Quote
Mav, the CPU OC is not affected by the amount of RAM you put in the board. I've not seen this issue at all with Skylake, so Kaby won't be any different.

You'd need to adjust the IMC voltage accordingly when adding in more sticks, as most manufacturers overshoot the amount required by something fierce (0.2v+ in some cases). Other than that, it's as simple as adding in modules and making sure it's stable.

I haven't got any gear here to be able to tell you 100%, but that is my suspicion.
jinq-sea 4th January 2017, 17:43 Quote
The only driver here to change for me is the 4K video support - I've a 6700K in my 'HTPC'. The thing is - the TV does most of the streaming lark in 4K HDR anyway, and the only thing I'll use it for is UHD Blu-ray. I also don't use the onboard GPU in the chip, so I've now realised that an 'upgrade' to a 7700K is pointless. Don't you just love 'stream of consciousness' posts?

Sorry everyone. I do agree however that if you're looking to upgrade now, the 7xxx series chips are a no-brainer. If I were still rocking a Z77-or-earlier chipset, I'd be all over the upgrade for NVMe alone. Dat speed tho.

From a moderately recent platform? I'd probably not bother.

EDIT: @pb2000 - why is S2011 stupid?
Isitari 4th January 2017, 17:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMadDutchDude
You can do that, but unless you have a Z77 or newer board (might even work on Z68) then you are going to struggle to boot from it without modifying your BIOS/UEFI.

The whole point of it, for me, is for it to be a rapid boot device and store a few games that really benefit from fast loading times (big maps for example) - that's what mine does.
Does this work with just a pci-e card in Z77? I assume you can't boot from it though?

Sent from my SM-N915FY using Tapatalk
play_boy_2000 4th January 2017, 18:15 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by jinq-sea
EDIT: @pb2000 - why is S2011 stupid?

It's a server socket, designed for 2/4 way systems running large numbers of VMs and/or large parallel workflows. Sure, it's fun to do this but confining it to a single socket is a crime, not to mention the $1700 price tag for the 6950X.
RedFlames 4th January 2017, 18:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by play_boy_2000
It's a server socket, designed for 2/4 way systems running large numbers of VMs and/or large parallel workflows. Sure, it's fun to do this but confining it to a single socket is a crime, not to mention the $1700 price tag for the 6950X.

so was Skt 1366... don't recall anyone whinging about that...
play_boy_2000 4th January 2017, 18:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedFlames
so was Skt 1366... don't recall anyone whinging about that...
Socket 2011 was a replacement for socket 1567 and intel, for whatever reason decided not to create a new variant of 1366 (I think it was planned, but canceled somewhere along the line). Socket 2011 takes everything that was overkill about desktop 1366 and adds more of it (4-way system, 4 channel memory, 40 PCIe lans).
Mister_Tad 4th January 2017, 19:25 Quote
Intel launching a new dedicated "enthusiast" (but not too enthusiast) platform seems even more silly than having a one-way s2011 system.

The fact they even bother with X99 seems a bit of a gift to the enthusiast user tbh.
LennyRhys 4th January 2017, 19:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by play_boy_2000
Sure, it's fun to do this but confining it to a single socket is a crime, not to mention the $1700 price tag for the 6950X.

It's a matter of opinion - if your needs are met by a socket 1366 or 2011 system, then it's not a crime to use it. Now whether or not it's a "crime" to use a 6950X in a gaming rig is a different matter entirely, but still subjective.

And I'd strongly disagree that 1366 was ever overkill; it was a nice upgrade from the very best Core2 platforms and amazingly it is still able to hold its own in the multi-core performance stakes today. If I was to upgrade now (I probably will be in the summer) I'd be looking first at X99 because it meets my needs in a way that "non-enthusiast" systems don't. For me, going from six cores/twelve threads to, for example, a 7700K would be of virtually no benefit given my workflow. Conversely, going to a 5960X or any of a number of LGA2011-3 Xeons with 10, 12 etc. cores would be a tremendous upgrade.
jrs77 4th January 2017, 19:57 Quote
I'm still sad that they won't pursue IrisPro graphics for the desktop any further. Having an iGPU capable of playing games like Borderlands in 1080p and medium to high settings is just awesome. And with an i7 4C/8T at only 65W TDP under it's belly it makes the perfect workstation CPU (APU).

Anyways, yet another 2-3% increase in performance at the same TDP. Business as usual.
Here's waiting for Ryzen, the miracle AMD-chip that catches up with intels CPU-performance and has a powerful iGPU ontop.
jinq-sea 4th January 2017, 20:31 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by play_boy_2000
It's a server socket, designed for 2/4 way systems running large numbers of VMs and/or large parallel workflows. Sure, it's fun to do this but confining it to a single socket is a crime, not to mention the $1700 price tag for the 6950X.

It's fun. It's daft. It's overkill for gaming, yes, but - if you use your rig for, say Pro Tools or something like that, it's also eminently useable. I know the 5960X (and indeed the 6950X) are mad CPUs, but they're cracking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister_Tad
Intel launching a new dedicated "enthusiast" (but not too enthusiast) platform seems even more silly than having a one-way s2011 system.

The fact they even bother with X99 seems a bit of a gift to the enthusiast user tbh.

This is just it - it's for 'enthusiasts'. Those of us who like things a bit daft. Since when was overkill stupid? This is Bit-Tech.

Plus - I use my machine for audio-processing and recording when my Mac Mini isn't up to snuff...
Vault-Tec 4th January 2017, 20:36 Quote
I like Intel's big sockets. Give it time and you can always find a cracking Xeon to shove in for peanuts. Just recently I bought a 2680V2 Ivybridge 8 core for £100. It's bloody quick too. Awesome for virtual machines etc.

No idea why they call that part of the market the enthusiast section really. Maybe they are stroking people's egos? no idea.

I do like to fiddle with software and I would be gutted if I did not have the virtualisation tech enabled.
GravitySmacked 4th January 2017, 21:09 Quote
Yawn, I remember when new CPU launches were exciting.
Harlequin 4th January 2017, 21:38 Quote
sadly the first AM4 APU will be kevari based (but the chip allways had ,had the option for using DDR4, so enabling it is a no brainer)
play_boy_2000 4th January 2017, 21:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by LennyRhys
It's a matter of opinion - if your needs are met by a socket 1366 or 2011 system, then it's not a crime to use it. Now whether or not it's a "crime" to use a 6950X in a gaming rig is a different matter entirely, but still subjective.

And I'd strongly disagree that 1366 was ever overkill; it was a nice upgrade from the very best Core2 platforms and amazingly it is still able to hold its own in the multi-core performance stakes today. If I was to upgrade now (I probably will be in the summer) I'd be looking first at X99 because it meets my needs in a way that "non-enthusiast" systems don't. For me, going from six cores/twelve threads to, for example, a 7700K would be of virtually no benefit given my workflow. Conversely, going to a 5960X or any of a number of LGA2011-3 Xeons with 10, 12 etc. cores would be a tremendous upgrade.

After the 920, s1366 was never a terribly good value for the enthusiast gamer, unless you were crazy enough to be running running 2+ gpus. It had a bad habit of being outperformed by a system costing half as much, a year later.

Don't get me wrong though, if you're using the hardware as a workstation or server, it's worth it, although I wouldn't buy new (3-4 year old server hardware is ridiculously cheap).
Vault-Tec 4th January 2017, 22:17 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GravitySmacked
Yawn, I remember when new CPU launches were exciting.

Sandybridge was the last exciting launch for me.

This (Kaby) just does what they promised Devil's Canyon would do.
perplekks45 5th January 2017, 08:11 Quote
Meh.

That is all.
rollo 5th January 2017, 08:45 Quote
The reason is that sort of gains in Intels position are hard to come by. AMD will gain 40-50% but they are that far behind. It's not like they will be 20% ahead of Intel either. Doubt they will even start a price war.

The cpu market outside of Smartphones is pretty boring.

Apple is pushing smartphone cpus pretty hard. Even they will hit a limit soon.
Bindibadgi 5th January 2017, 14:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin
get a pcie4x card for M2 on an older board?

No boot support. Certainly no NVMe support.

Anfield - I do! Also, rhetorical question.
Mister_Tad 5th January 2017, 15:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by play_boy_2000
It had a bad habit of being outperformed by a system costing half as much, a year later.

There's never really been a time in computing history when something like that hasn't happened though, it comes with the territory.
rollo 5th January 2017, 17:42 Quote
Still think be at least May before we have a clear picture of the cpu market from top to bottom. With the lower end of amds range not due before April at last estimates.
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