bit-tech.net

Asus Maximus VII Gene Review

Comments 1 to 13 of 13

Reply
Hustler 7th July 2014, 08:40 Quote
I really don't understand the point of the Micro ATX form factor...the cases they go in are nearly all standard size or at least barely any smaller, so why put a smaller board in them with fewer expansion options?, it just seems to be limiting yourself for the sake of it, not to mention a small board looks kind of stupid in a standard size case with all the extra empty space around it.

Mini-ITX I get, lovely compact systems in small, go-anywhere cases, but MicroATX?...nope,sorry
Combatus 7th July 2014, 09:14 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
I really don't understand the point of the Micro ATX form factor...the cases they go in are nearly all standard size or at least barely any smaller, so why put a smaller board in them with fewer expansion options?, it just seems to be limiting yourself for the sake of it, not to mention a small board looks kind of stupid in a standard size case with all the extra empty space around it.

Mini-ITX I get, lovely compact systems in small, go-anywhere cases, but MicroATX?...nope,sorry

There are quite a few micro-ATX cases that are noticably smaller than small ATX cases - the SilverStone SG10 and Prodigy M are two examples. There's crossover at both ends, though, as the smaller micro-ATX cases are also not much bigger than many of their larger mini-ITX counterparts either, at least for gaming-orientated cases. I think the main reason to opt for a micro-ATX system is that if you're happy with a single GPU and a sound card, then they're all you need - that's the vast majority of enthusiasts catered for.
Spreadie 7th July 2014, 09:40 Quote
Have Asus finally stopped cheating with their mobos then? No more sneaky multiplier bumps to enhance the "stock speed" performance and give them an edge against the competition? ;)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
{mATX rage}
...and yet every major chassis manufacturer offers several mATX cases of varying designs and sizes, to match the myriad mATX boards on the market. Yeah, they're obviously pointless.
Noob? 7th July 2014, 10:34 Quote
I have an Asus Gene VI, yet why do I want this? :(
Fizzban 7th July 2014, 10:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noob?
I have an Asus Gene VI, yet why do I want this? :(

Because it has VII in the name and yours has a VI :)
Noob? 7th July 2014, 11:07 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fizzban
Because it has VII in the name and yours has a VI :)

You may have hit it on the head! :p

Joking aside, looks delicious! :)

Really like the addon boards ATM from Asus on their motherboards.
IanW 7th July 2014, 12:23 Quote
The only thing that attracts me to the VII over my VI is the repositioned M.2 slot.

On the VI, it's part of the "Combo Card" that also provides Mini-PCIe, and its placement limits drive size to the "2242" format, which maxes out at 128GB I think.

By placing the M.2 slot between the 16x PCIe slots like other Z97 boards, one can now fit a "2280" format drive, allowing for 256GB and larger SSDs.
DatenThielt 7th July 2014, 13:29 Quote
As you'd expect with a ROG board, there are plenty of overclocking-centric features such as on-board power and resent buttons

resent XD
SchizoFrog 7th July 2014, 13:36 Quote
The thing that worries me is that ASUS may indeed include all sorts of 'options' for overclocking but it seems to be a fair simple process these days with a fairly well know limit point (depending on CPU used) to aim for. With so many of the ASUS extras being surplus to requirements, boards from other manufacturers which are significantly cheaper than the ASUS boards seem to be the way to go as they all still hit the maximum overclocks with ease and simplicity.

I really like the ASUS ROG stuff but find it hard to justify the 30-40% premium for stuff that I'll probably never use. Here's hoping the Impact VII review will give me a reason to think again.
Hustler 7th July 2014, 18:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
boards from other manufacturers which are significantly cheaper than the ASUS boards seem to be the way to go as they all still hit the maximum overclocks with ease and simplicity.

Yes they are a premium product but one of the benefits is that they keep their value better when selling them on than the budget Motherboards.

I just bought an Asus VII Hero for my 4690K and I'm willing to bet I could sell it on in 12mths and still get £100+ for it, because all those 'extras' will seem like a bargain at such a price for someone building a cheap PC.
SchizoFrog 7th July 2014, 18:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
boards from other manufacturers which are significantly cheaper than the ASUS boards seem to be the way to go as they all still hit the maximum overclocks with ease and simplicity.

Yes they are a premium product but one of the benefits is that they keep their value better when selling them on than the budget Motherboards.

I just bought an Asus VII Hero for my 4690K and I'm willing to bet I could sell it on in 12mths and still get £100+ for it, because all those 'extras' will seem like a bargain at such a price for someone building a cheap PC.

Fine for those who upgrade every 12 months but I don't. I want the right board and CPU for me which will sit there working away happily and by the time I come to need an upgrade the platform will be well and truly outdated.
Although I do think you may be overestimating it's future value as the MSI boards seem to perform just as good and while they may not have every feature the ASUS boards do, they are significantly cheaper. Thus in 12 months time you may find that there are many more of them on the second hand market and you may struggle to sell your board at your desired resell value.
Xir 8th July 2014, 08:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizoFrog
I really like the AROG stuff but find it hard to justify the 30-40% premium for stuff that I'll probably never use. Here's hoping the Impact VII review will give me a reason to think again.

Well, you coud always choose an Asus Gryphon as a cheaper enthusiast board, or even a bog standart Asus board with a much softer pricing.
Problem is finding reviews for those though.
Anfield 8th July 2014, 08:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustler
Mini-ITX I get, lovely compact systems in small, go-anywhere cases, but MicroATX?...nope,sorry

Due to the layout many Mini ITX boards are limiting you in terms of hardware:

Single Pci-e slot
2 Ram slots
Sata port shortage (and no chance to add more due to the single pci-e slot being used by the graphicscard)
Very limited space for Cpu cooler

None of those restriction exist on MATX.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums