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Intel Core i5-4690K Review

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phem0r 3rd July 2014, 11:14 Quote
Cost aside, i think the 4690K & 4790K are both worthwhile purchases if you are coming from Sandy Bridge or older, you might as well wait for Broadwell otherwise..
Shirty 3rd July 2014, 11:24 Quote
I think you'd be crushed coming from a Sandy Bridge chip (most likely the 2500K since that's what all the sensible ones bought).

The 4690K is barely any quicker at stock, and when both chips are OCd the difference is negligible...

Basically, unless you need any of the new features of a more recent CPU, anyone on a Sandy/Ivy bridge platform should save their pennies.
will_123 3rd July 2014, 11:26 Quote
Quote:
Basically, unless you need any of the new features of a more recent CPU, anyone on a Sandy/Ivy bridge platform should save their pennies.

Thats just what i was thinking. Power consumption benchmarks are very impressive though. I wont be upgrading any time soon.
Corky42 3rd July 2014, 11:27 Quote
With no big jumps in performance from Intel for the last few generations they should rename Broadwell to BroadShoulders :D It seems a lot of people are pinning their hopes on it.

We may not get much more than the usual 5-10% performance boost, but at least we will get some new features.
tonyd223 3rd July 2014, 13:34 Quote
That idle power consumption is nice - looking at just power alone, I'm so glad I finally moved from AMD this year...
r3loaded 3rd July 2014, 13:49 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by phem0r
Cost aside, i think the 4690K & 4790K are both worthwhile purchases if you are coming from Sandy Bridge or older, you might as well wait for Broadwell otherwise..
Not really, my Sandy Bridge 2500K is already more than fast enough for me, especially at 4.6Ghz. It can still outpace the stock 4770 in my work computer quite easily, and the latter does a lot of code compilation every day.
Hustler 3rd July 2014, 14:24 Quote
I got one of these last week and with volts set to Auto in the BIOS (Asus VII Hero) I can get it 100% stable up to 4.7Ghz with 1.275vlts.

I can boot at 4.8Ghz with 1.275 and successfully run Cinebench, but it locked up running Asus Realbench (on the 2nd benchmark test)

http://i.picpar.com/6pT.jpg

I'm sure I could easily get it stable with more volts but I only have a mid level tower cooler on it and temps creep into the low 90's in Prime, so unless I get a better cooler, 4.7 is as high as I'm going.

For normal usage I'm running it at 4.6Ghz on 1.25 and temps stay in the low 80's in Prime...in stuff like games, I've never seen it go above 60c..which is damn good for a £25 air cooler.

Overall I'm well pleased with my purchase.
DbD 3rd July 2014, 15:10 Quote
puts on oven gloves and pats i2500K affectionately - the old girls still got what it takes.

Anyone talking about upgrading from sandy bridge hasn't been around long enough to know what a real upgrade is - going from a 3.2Ghz P4C to a core 2 duo that also did 3.2Ghz o/c, or from a core 2 quad @ 3.0 to an i2500K @ 4.3. That's an upgrade! These days hardly anything changes.
Shirty 3rd July 2014, 15:19 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
puts on oven gloves and pats i2500K affectionately - the old girls still got what it takes.

Anyone talking about upgrading from sandy bridge hasn't been around long enough to know what a real upgrade is - going from a 3.2Ghz P4C to a core 2 duo that also did 3.2Ghz o/c, or from a core 2 quad @ 3.0 to an i2500K @ 4.3. That's an upgrade! These days hardly anything changes.

^^^ So this ^^^

Celeron 600MHZ -> Athlon XP 2400+ = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Athlon XP 2400+ -> Core 2 Duo E6600 = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core 2 Duo E6600 -> Core 2 Duo E8400 = Meh

Core 2 Duo E8400 -> Core i5 2500K = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core i5 2500K -> Core i5 4690K = Meh

I'll be waiting until the next socket update before I even think about trading my current 3570K. Delidded it's much cooler than my 2500K was, and clocks just as well.
Hustler 3rd July 2014, 15:20 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD


Anyone talking about upgrading from sandy bridge hasn't been around long enough to know what a real upgrade is

..I went from a dual core Phenom II 550 to a 4690K....that's an upgrade for real men, with beards.
Harlequin 3rd July 2014, 15:52 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyd223
That idle power consumption is nice - looking at just power alone, I'm so glad I finally moved from AMD this year...

the difference is about 90 watts - which will take you 26 months for the cost difference in savings if your using a pc 24/7 at full load....
tonyd223 3rd July 2014, 16:54 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyd223
That idle power consumption is nice - looking at just power alone, I'm so glad I finally moved from AMD this year...

the difference is about 90 watts - which will take you 26 months for the cost difference in savings if your using a pc 24/7 at full load....

Good point well made.

(If I was properly concerned re power usage I'd probably unplug all those old phone chargers)
Shirty 3rd July 2014, 16:59 Quote
It's still a saving though, and think of all the heat you'd have had to tame ;)
Harlequin 3rd July 2014, 17:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirty
It's still a saving though, and think of all the heat you'd have had to tame ;)

having read another website review - was shocked to see the 4790k was running hotter than the amd 9590 as well
rollo 3rd July 2014, 18:15 Quote
Got a link to this website? As ive read most of the reviews of the recent chips and not seen too much of it.

As for Cpus in general the lack of competition has killed the market place you have 1 runaway leader and the other is so far behind you wont even see its dust clouds.

Heres a question for everyone if AMD Was competitive as Harle would like us to think would Intel have released broadwell this year or made more of a push to get it out of the door instead of releasing a sidegrade from last years models?
Elton 3rd July 2014, 21:33 Quote
I think the only impetus for me to upgrade is that I want to build a M-atx/M-ITX build. The newer boards usually support better things, but even PCI-E 2.0 and my 2500K @ 4.4Ghz is still working fantastically.
Combatus 3rd July 2014, 22:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirty
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
puts on oven gloves and pats i2500K affectionately - the old girls still got what it takes.

Anyone talking about upgrading from sandy bridge hasn't been around long enough to know what a real upgrade is - going from a 3.2Ghz P4C to a core 2 duo that also did 3.2Ghz o/c, or from a core 2 quad @ 3.0 to an i2500K @ 4.3. That's an upgrade! These days hardly anything changes.

^^^ So this ^^^

Celeron 600MHZ -> Athlon XP 2400+ = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Athlon XP 2400+ -> Core 2 Duo E6600 = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core 2 Duo E6600 -> Core 2 Duo E8400 = Meh

Core 2 Duo E8400 -> Core i5 2500K = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core i5 2500K -> Core i5 4690K = Meh

I'll be waiting until the next socket update before I even think about trading my current 3570K. Delidded it's much cooler than my 2500K was, and clocks just as well.

Interesting that two of the three MASSIVE UPGRADEs included a doubling of the core count or switching from AMD to Intel and vice versa :)
Anfield 3rd July 2014, 22:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirty
It's still a saving though, and think of all the heat you'd have had to tame ;)

Exactly, besides the financial advantage of saving electricity you can also use a smaller cooler which allows using a smaller case and you can turn fan speeds down.
Shirty 3rd July 2014, 23:48 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Combatus
Interesting that two of the three MASSIVE UPGRADEs included a doubling of the core count or switching from AMD to Intel and vice versa :)

Such is the nature of MASSIVE UPGRADEs :D

The Haswell/DC range are a no-brainer if you're starting afresh from an older rig and don't really want to go second hand, but for anyone upgrading from a Sandy i5 or later these are just a silly option.

This of course coming from me who replaced a 2500K with a 3570K - but in fairness I sold the Sandy for the same price I paid for the Ivy...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anfield
Exactly, besides the financial advantage of saving electricity you can also use a smaller cooler which allows using a smaller case and you can turn fan speeds down.

Same or better potency for less power draw is always nice to have. Obviously heat density will become a growing issue as die sizes shrink more and more, but as long as Intel steer clear of using KY jelly and hope to attach the heatspreader in the future (I'm looking at you Ivy Bridge) all should be well.
Harlequin 4th July 2014, 00:39 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollo
Got a link to this website? As ive read most of the reviews of the recent chips and not seen too much of it.

As for Cpus in general the lack of competition has killed the market place you have 1 runaway leader and the other is so far behind you wont even see its dust clouds.

Heres a question for everyone if AMD Was competitive as Harle would like us to think would Intel have released broadwell this year or made more of a push to get it out of the door instead of releasing a sidegrade from last years models?



http://www.eteknix.com/intel-core-i7-4790k-devils-canyon-processor-review/9/

I have shown time and again my 9590 matches a 4770k when all cores are used - and mine runs at 57 degree`s under load under the AIO they use.
dec 4th July 2014, 00:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirty
Quote:
Originally Posted by DbD
puts on oven gloves and pats i2500K affectionately - the old girls still got what it takes.

Anyone talking about upgrading from sandy bridge hasn't been around long enough to know what a real upgrade is - going from a 3.2Ghz P4C to a core 2 duo that also did 3.2Ghz o/c, or from a core 2 quad @ 3.0 to an i2500K @ 4.3. That's an upgrade! These days hardly anything changes.

^^^ So this ^^^

Celeron 600MHZ -> Athlon XP 2400+ = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Athlon XP 2400+ -> Core 2 Duo E6600 = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core 2 Duo E6600 -> Core 2 Duo E8400 = Meh

Core 2 Duo E8400 -> Core i5 2500K = MASSIVE UPGRADE

Core i5 2500K -> Core i5 4690K = Meh

I'll be waiting until the next socket update before I even think about trading my current 3570K. Delidded it's much cooler than my 2500K was, and clocks just as well.

I can do your MASSIVE UPGRADES one better.

Pentium 4 2.4 -> Core i5 4690K = MONSTER UPGRADE

My 4690 just recently arrived. Have not used it yet but a monster upgrade is what I'm expecting.
Shirty 4th July 2014, 01:22 Quote
RAMPAGE UPGRADE
SchizoFrog 4th July 2014, 01:47 Quote
I was going to wait until the high end Maxwell GPUs launched before upgrading (Q6600) but now all I am waiting for are the 'gaming' Mini-ITX boards (mainly from MSI and ASUS) to get reviewed, particularly the ASUS Impact VII. Once I decide on the board I will start the upgrade and use my current 750Ti for the time being.
SchizoFrog 4th July 2014, 03:24 Quote
I would just like to post regarding the prices too. The 'linked' price on Overclockers has shot up by almost £20 to £189.95 (retail).

Scan has it much cheaper at £167.94 (retail) and it can even be had a couple of £'s cheaper currently on their 'Today Only' offers.
Impatience 4th July 2014, 10:11 Quote
I've got the Z97 MSI Gaming AC, Schizo.. It's a great board! Not that great for cable management in a 250D because of the layout.. (Although maybe thats just me with bad cheap cables! :P) But everything else works really well!
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