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Intel DZ87KL-75K Review - A Last Hurrah

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B1GBUD 21st June 2013, 09:12 Quote
What?? No score?

Edit: nevermind, shame there isn't any stock.
GuilleAcoustic 21st June 2013, 09:55 Quote
Too bad they aren't doing motherboard anymore. I'm pretty affraid for the future of the thin-ITX form factor.
Gtek 21st June 2013, 10:16 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
Too bad they aren't doing motherboard anymore. I'm pretty affraid for the future of the thin-ITX form factor.

Exactly my fear...
Stanley Tweedle 21st June 2013, 10:19 Quote
Giant blue sloped roof heatsinks and it has a beeper speaker. I might buy. Then again I might not. No I won't buy although I think my mobo doesn't have a beeper speaker.
Xir 21st June 2013, 10:21 Quote
Why spend time testing a MoBo that's not on the market nor likely to ever be in significant numbers while you've not yet tested the ones that are?
Combatus 21st June 2013, 11:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xir
Why spend time testing a MoBo that's not on the market nor likely to ever be in significant numbers while you've not yet tested the ones that are?

As we mentioned in the review, it came as part of the Haswell press kit from Intel, and as no other boards were available prior to the Haswell NDA earlier this month, we had to use it to test the new CPUs anyway. It was only a little more work to do a review, but it's more of a feature really seeing as the motherboard may not be available. We thought it was interesting enough to take a look at, but don't worry, we've got plenty of boards on the way!
springbok82 21st June 2013, 12:14 Quote
I am eagerly awaiting a review of the Asus Maximus VI Gene! What you guys have to say about that board will have a significant effect on whether I move to Haswell (from i7 930/X58) or not. More mobo reviews pretty please! :)
GuilleAcoustic 21st June 2013, 12:37 Quote
Still on a Q6600. I do not feel like jumping to Haswell. Waiting for Kaveri or maybe an Haswell based NUC.
Stanley Tweedle 21st June 2013, 16:08 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuilleAcoustic
Still on a Q6600. I do not feel like jumping to Haswell. Waiting for Kaveri or maybe an Haswell based NUC.

Wow. Q6600. I still remember when I bought mine from OCUK for £135. I could finally play UT3 online without any FPS drops. Clocked at 3.6ghz for everyday use. Got it to 3.9ghz briefly. Amazingly when it came to selling it 4 years ago I got £102 for it overnight on eBay.
springbok82 21st June 2013, 18:45 Quote
Two of my workmates have old Core 2's and were on a tight budget to upgrade. As their budget did not allow a jump to newer architecture, I recommended a Q6600, easily picked up for around £40-£50 on Ebay. That was around 6 months ago, they're still thanking me. Like it changed their lives or something! That said, they are StarCraft: HotS fanatics.

They have some dough now but see no need to upgrade either as both are saving up for better graphics cards instead.

I still have the utmost respect for the Q6600!
eUphoria 21st June 2013, 19:15 Quote
Well, I'm writing this from my very elderly E8500 based setup! Keenly reading though as I'm on the cusp of a Haswell upgrade and deliberating my mobo choices
Floyd 21st June 2013, 21:47 Quote
I still have my Q6600 in my spare machine. Still one of my best buys! Right next to the 2500k
Elton 21st June 2013, 22:24 Quote
Q6600s are fantastic things.
AlienwareAndy 22nd June 2013, 00:58 Quote
I think the last Intel branded board I bought was the 440BX for my Pentium 2 haha.

They're either woefully expensive or woefully under specced. Still, it is a shame to see them pull out completely.
Elton 22nd June 2013, 06:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienwareAndy
I think the last Intel branded board I bought was the 440BX for my Pentium 2 haha.

They're either woefully expensive or woefully under specced. Still, it is a shame to see them pull out completely.

The fascinating thing about them after using quite a few in other builds are the amazingly rock solid stability on them. They are admittedly mediocre to bad overclockers and they may not have the world's most awesome features. But I will vouch for their amazing stability in their stock forms. Even though they had miserably boring BIOSes and an oddly sparse layout they were always reliable as a workhorse board.
Siwini 22nd June 2013, 21:03 Quote
mmm q6600, tasty.
AlienwareAndy 23rd June 2013, 15:33 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elton
The fascinating thing about them after using quite a few in other builds are the amazingly rock solid stability on them. They are admittedly mediocre to bad overclockers and they may not have the world's most awesome features. But I will vouch for their amazing stability in their stock forms. Even though they had miserably boring BIOSes and an oddly sparse layout they were always reliable as a workhorse board.

Yeah they are always built really well and made from good quality components :)

Their 440BX board was just gorgeous.
Xir 24th June 2013, 09:34 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Combatus
As we mentioned in the review, it came as part of the Haswell press kit from Intel, and as no other boards were available prior to the Haswell NDA earlier this month, we had to use it to test the new CPUs anyway. It was only a little more work to do a review, but it's more of a feature really seeing as the motherboard may not be available. We thought it was interesting enough to take a look at, but don't worry, we've got plenty of boards on the way!

I should have figured this.
Thx for the quick informative reply ;)
jon 24th June 2013, 13:09 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elton

The fascinating thing about them after using quite a few in other builds are the amazingly rock solid stability on them. They are admittedly mediocre to bad overclockers and they may not have the world's most awesome features. But I will vouch for their amazing stability in their stock forms. Even though they had miserably boring BIOSes and an oddly sparse layout they were always reliable as a workhorse board.

+1 to that

Used them on my old Pentium builds for customers (and at home). They just never failed. I moved back to Asus when the Intel chips started opening up to overclock again (remember the days when only AMD allowed you to OC? I mean,other than the original Celerons. :)

Wouldn't mind seeing Intel keep the mobo market open. As the review quite rightly points out, having Intel lay the groundwork for some mobos allows the industry partners learn a bit and iron out the wrinkles in new chipsets. This, in turn, makes intel's own chips better placed for brand support throughout the market.

This might not be Intel's brightest move ...
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