bit-tech.net

The Best Memory for AMD Lynx APUs

Comments 1 to 18 of 18

Reply
tonyd223 6th July 2011, 09:06 Quote
Does the amount of memory reserved by the system for graphics affect the performance as well?
kaiser 6th July 2011, 09:44 Quote
Without being facetious, the answer to that question should be pretty obvious. I hear too many people ask if having more ram will improve performance... well yeah, but only if it was running over in the first place (ignoring number of channels, ofc)

.More importantly, what kind of video ram usage to modern games use? I haven't seen an analysis of it for some time, clearly the GTX 460 758mb seems to do ok with less than a gig of ram, but how much is really needed?
BrightCandle 6th July 2011, 10:21 Quote
It looks like performance is scaling linearly with RAM clock speed. Any chance you can add some 2000+ Mhz results as well? Seems like this should get the absolute best out of the APU.

Its not all that surprising that its a RAM bandwidth starved. Its sharing with the CPU and DDR3 running at these low speeds is hardly what graphics cards are used to. A High end GPU from AMD will have a memory bandwidth well above 100 GB/s, and two 1866 sticks are mere 30GB/s (theoretical).
Nikols 6th July 2011, 10:31 Quote
Love these types of articles... I know this isn't the a/cpu for performance but when reviewing ram compatability it'd be great to read how it faired with all four slots filled and running at the spec'd speed of the ram. I like to read if new tech is improving high performance stability
tonyd223 6th July 2011, 10:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaiser
Without being facetious, the answer to that question should be pretty obvious. I hear too many people ask if having more ram will improve performance... well yeah, but only if it was running over in the first place (ignoring number of channels, ofc)

.More importantly, what kind of video ram usage to modern games use? I haven't seen an analysis of it for some time, clearly the GTX 460 758mb seems to do ok with less than a gig of ram, but how much is really needed?

I was wondering more how ram is allocated to video memory - static allocation or dynamic. So the test is a 4GB kit - how much memory is required to run the game and run the graphics and is that ram allocated dynamically - which means is there a minimum ram requirement for different games...

You know what I mean.

Also +1 on the 4 slot thing rather than 2 slots of memory...
xaser04 6th July 2011, 11:02 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightCandle
It looks like performance is scaling linearly with RAM clock speed. Any chance you can add some 2000+ Mhz results as well? Seems like this should get the absolute best out of the APU.

Its not all that surprising that its a RAM bandwidth starved. Its sharing with the CPU and DDR3 running at these low speeds is hardly what graphics cards are used to. A High end GPU from AMD will have a memory bandwidth well above 100 GB/s, and two 1866 sticks are mere 30GB/s (theoretical).

Bit mentioned that a overclocking review is coming, hopefully we will see resultw of quicker RAM speeds there.

Overclocking should be very interesting based on what I have seen so far. The TDP limit design imposted by AMD (each task given a tdp allocation dynamically) means that once you start pushing the CPU the GPU has less TDP budget to play with, thus your overall gaming performance may drop instead of improve (assuming you are using the Llano GPU and not a discrete one).

Overclocking just the RAM should allow for improvements all round, especially in scenarios that are heavily bandhwidth limited (gaming).
Material 6th July 2011, 11:43 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrightCandle
It looks like performance is scaling linearly with RAM clock speed. Any chance you can add some 2000+ Mhz results as well? Seems like this should get the absolute best out of the APU.

1866MHz is the highest speed RAM that the processors are rated to run with and as a result that's as high as our board could take the RAM.

To get it to run faster you'll need to overclock, the base clock of the board, something which our test board didn't like doing (see our original Lynx review for more information). Hopefully we'll get more competent boards in in the future and be able to see how performance scales with even faster memory speeds.
tonyd223 6th July 2011, 11:52 Quote
also would be nice to see some platform stats with a 6670 in crossfire...
DarkFear 6th July 2011, 11:53 Quote
I don't know why, but for some reason this review made me want to watch Simpsons.... :p
John_T 6th July 2011, 12:42 Quote
Hey, you've given us the review we wanted: You love us, you really love us! :)
Farfalho 6th July 2011, 12:50 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_T
Hey, you've given us the review we wanted: You love us, you really love us! :)

Feeling the same kind of love and that AMD really brought to us a really nice product and even a possible LAN party pc
Chicken76 6th July 2011, 13:15 Quote
Quote:
We re-tested Left 4 Dead 2 with 1,333MHz memory at 1,080 x 1,050 ...
That's a rather unusual resolution to run a game at, isn't it? (page 3, paragraph 6)
OCJunkie 6th July 2011, 19:01 Quote
Well, those were extremely predictable results but nice to see nonetheless. I would have liked to see the test expanded to cover the impact of 4GB vs 8GB kit as well though.
Material 6th July 2011, 19:39 Quote
I had to scratch out the time for this testing as it was...

Would you really out 8GB of RAM in a budget Lynx system though?
-VK- 6th July 2011, 20:29 Quote
Be interesting to see your take on Dual Graphics :)
[-Stash-] 7th July 2011, 13:25 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Material
Would you really out 8GB of RAM in a budget Lynx system though?
That depends on whether or not it was worth the outlay for the performance ;)
8GB isn't all that much money now, so… also, 8GB RAM isn't unreasonable if you're a heavy multitasker when not playing games.
John_T 7th July 2011, 13:58 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Material
I had to scratch out the time for this testing as it was...

Yeah, it was worth it though! :)

I'm contemplating building a totally silent, 0db system that's still capable of gaming around this:
http://www.quietpc.com/gb-en-gbp/products/pc-cases/nof-set-a40

Only thing that's giving me pause is the price - as the better 400W passive Seasonic PSU can be had for about £120, which values the heatsink & (frankly ugly) case at about £280, which is not especially good value when the case looks to be worth about £50.

If I did build it, an extra few quid on RAM is small by comparison, especially if it does have a significant effect. Though saying that, I can't see going from 4GB to 8GB making much difference, it was the speed I was after...
nuc13ar 3rd March 2012, 15:03 Quote
but anytime you change any of the other components, you would have to replace the thermal paste? no thanks. cool link, though.
Log in

You are not logged in, please login with your forum account below. If you don't already have an account please register to start contributing.



Discuss in the forums