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Zalman Quiet Trio

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tank_rider 27th April 2006, 16:23 Quote
penultimate scentance on the first page currently reads "weapons against silence", should read "weapons against noise".

Moderator - fixed thanks. Not sure how that slipped through.
DXR_13KE 27th April 2006, 16:38 Quote
"The CNPS9500-AT, VF900-Cu and ZM460-APS are weapons against silence. Join us as we lock, load and fire them up against some of the hottest hardware around..."

LOL :D

this hardware seems to be cool :D
Adnuo 27th April 2006, 18:01 Quote
http://www.bit-tech.net/content_images/Zalman_Quiet_Trio/18.jpg

Someone want to inform me what the difference between "Noiseless" and "Silent" is? Their own little made-up graph even takes a huge hike between the two.

Definition of silent: Marked by absence of noise or sound; still.

So...yeah. Good job Zalman marketing reps. Also, the fan on the XFX 6800GT is nowhere near silent, or even "pretty good". It's easily the loudest component in my system, louder even than the northbridge fan on my DFI SLi-D at it's highest speed. The Zalman VGA cooler is what I was going to replace it with anyway, as my 7700CU is one of the best HSF combo's I've had. Also, it would have been nice to have the actual stats of the PSU, other than "this many watts lol torque". Things like the individual amperage on each line, etc. etc. And a deeper dive into the difference between the lower and higher models, other than "one is for SLi and one isn't". Is that because the lower end has less power on the 12V lines? Or the higher one has dual 12V rails to keep the graphics cards on a seperate, steady line? Last niggle -- Zalman have fitted non-standard molex on their power supplies, which work extremely well and make removing them from tight sockets very nice, but if you're working in tight quarters, these can sometimes get in the way. Another thing that could be important to mention.
FIBRE+ 27th April 2006, 18:24 Quote
I was hoping the card used would've been one of the 7900GT's you had/have in your office. Ah well, still a good review :)
Rich_13 27th April 2006, 19:42 Quote
the 7900's do run a fair bit hotter from what i hear, would be great with a follow up.
-Xp- 27th April 2006, 19:43 Quote
According to this image, "silent" does not actually mean silent.

http://www.bit-tech.net/content_images/Zalman_Quiet_Trio/18.jpg

Joy...the corporations are reinventing our language for the purpose of marketing.
teamtd11 27th April 2006, 20:05 Quote
Noiseless is between 18-20db
Fly 27th April 2006, 20:18 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
http://www.bit-tech.net/content_images/Zalman_Quiet_Trio/18.jpg

Someone want to inform me what the difference between "Noiseless" and "Silent" is? Their own little made-up graph even takes a huge hike between the two.

I didn't take into consideration the graph.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
Also, the fan on the XFX 6800GT is nowhere near silent, or even "pretty good".

The one on ours is, perhaps a different revision?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
Also, it would have been nice to have the actual stats of the PSU, other than "this many watts lol torque". Things like the individual amperage on each line, etc. etc.

It's there if you look.

http://www.bit-tech.net/content_images/Zalman_Quiet_Trio/4c.jpg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
And a deeper dive into the difference between the lower and higher models, other than "one is for SLi and one isn't". Is that because the lower end has less power on the 12V lines? Or the higher one has dual 12V rails to keep the graphics cards on a seperate, steady line?

We were reviewing the A model, if we get a B we will compare them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
Last niggle -- Zalman have fitted non-standard molex on their power supplies, which work extremely well and make removing them from tight sockets very nice, but if you're working in tight quarters, these can sometimes get in the way. Another thing that could be important to mention.

Actually, there is no such thing as a "standard" 4-way power connector, but fair point.

:)
dire_wolf 27th April 2006, 23:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
http://www.bit-tech.net/content_images/Zalman_Quiet_Trio/18.jpg

Someone want to inform me what the difference between "Noiseless" and "Silent" is? Their own little made-up graph even takes a huge hike between the two.

I assume that noisless means that the fan will be switched off altogether, and silent is slow RPM.
cpemma 28th April 2006, 01:03 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by dire_wolf
I assume that noisless means that the fan will be switched off altogether, and silent is slow RPM.
See the graph, in Zalman ad-speak 'noiseless' = not noisy.
Quote:
At £70 inc vat, which appears to have been recently cut from £80, the ZM460-APS is far from cheap, its silence is in fact golden in more ways than one. The Globalwin Super Silent 450W, Akasa Ultra Quiet 460W and Tagan 420W Whisper Quiet PSU all come in at nearly £20 cheaper than the ZM460-APS and claim to be silent or thereabouts.
And Scan have several low-noise PSUs on offer until Friday ('Today Only' section), just ordered me the 430w Seasonic S12-430 aPFC PSU Silent ATX2.0 @ £35.84 inc VAT. :D
speedfreek 28th April 2006, 01:05 Quote
I spotted a few typos but I guess I could let it slide, because I cant find them agian. :D

I have one of their large chunks of copper in my case and it works quite well. And you were able to keep that pentium pretty durn cool. Comparing almost any aftermarket heatsink to a stock one isnt really fair, unless its a thermaltake leafblower model, my cheapo old heatsink outperformed an athlon 64's retail one without trying.
FIBRE+ 28th April 2006, 03:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_13
the 7900's do run a fair bit hotter from what i hear, would be great with a follow up.
My 7900GT is ok, idleing at 42oC with stock clocks and cooler. Pretty good considering the 7800GTX runs about 5-10oC hotter with a better cooler and lower clocks :)
yahooadam 28th April 2006, 10:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo
Last niggle -- Zalman have fitted non-standard molex on their power supplies, which work extremely well and make removing them from tight sockets very nice, but if you're working in tight quarters, these can sometimes get in the way. Another thing that could be important to mention.
personally i would class those connectors as a big +

i had to change all the molex connectors on mine

nice to see they braided ALL their cables (alot only seem to do the main ATX one)

Some actualy testing (Watt wise and such) of the PSU would have been nice, but i dont know if bit tech have the equipment to do it
Fly 28th April 2006, 13:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yahooadam


Some actualy testing (Watt wise and such) of the PSU would have been nice, but i dont know if bit tech have the equipment to do it

As mentioned in the review, the most important thing that you should consider when buying a PSU is long term stability under load. The system we used to test was pretty demanding and under full use of all components the PSU remaned silent and rock solid. Testing output power on the rails is beyond the scope of the review and unfortunately needs sophisticated equipment.
Tim S 28th April 2006, 14:04 Quote
FWIW, we are looking to do something substantial with power supplies some time in the summer/autumn if all goes to plan.
yahooadam 28th April 2006, 19:22 Quote
PCSTATS has an interesting way of testing PSU's

there are a couple of people who have MFR PSU testers

The important things seem to be, real load, power usage, operating tempreatures

also measuring with motherboard moniters is not good testing ...
Tim S 28th April 2006, 19:23 Quote
who said we'd be doing "something substantial" with PSUs using motherboards? ;)
Fly 28th April 2006, 20:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yahooadam

The important things seem to be, real load, power usage, operating tempreatures

also measuring with motherboard moniters is not good testing ...

Actually I used a handheld K-Type Thermometer for temperatures, my ears for sound levels and a multimeter for voltages.

;)
Fozzy 29th April 2006, 21:17 Quote
TBH the only reason anybody would want to know voltage stabilty is for extreme overclocking with voltage mods to the motherboard. It would be reasonable to assume anyone with those requirements wouldnt be concerned with noise. And if they were you'd still want more than 460w.
unrealhippie 29th April 2006, 23:11 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly
Actually I used a handheld K-Type Thermometer for temperatures, my ears for sound levels and a multimeter for voltages.

;)

Ownage! :)

Hmm you guys need some noise testing equipment, but thats awefully expensive... There must be a way around it...
Fly 29th April 2006, 23:55 Quote
Subjective opinions are better than decibel readings as they are considered inaccurate unless under strict testing conditions (the bit-tech Anechoic and Hemi-anechoic chambers are still just a pipe dream unfortunately).

If I said the xxxx product runs at 15 decibels, would you really know how to reproduce that in your home? I have a Digital Sound Meter, but there is little point me using it because I'd have no point of reference to use.
yahooadam 30th April 2006, 00:05 Quote
well you would have to take a measure of your surroundings and then what its like running

however, decibel readings are generally unhelpful imo
Fly 1st May 2006, 14:12 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by yahooadam
well you would have to take a measure of your surroundings and then what its like running

Surroundings?

That's as vague as it gets. Distance? Directions of sensor? Is the wall absorbing or reflecting? Review sites have to recreate the testing environment exactly as it was for every review, and it is impossible to do so unless you have a chamber to do the testing in. This is why a subjective report on sound levels is more useful in this case.
yahooadam 1st May 2006, 16:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly
Surroundings?

That's as vague as it gets. Distance? Directions of sensor? Is the wall absorbing or reflecting? Review sites have to recreate the testing environment exactly as it was for every review, and it is impossible to do so unless you have a chamber to do the testing in. This is why a subjective report on sound levels is more useful in this case.
true true
Sathy 7th May 2006, 00:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adnuo

Also, it would have been nice to have the actual stats of the PSU, other than "this many watts lol torque". Things like the individual amperage on each line, etc. etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly
It's there if you look.

So that image is clear enough by your standards or what? I really think it isn't nearly clear enough. Sorry to say, but that reply seems like an excuse. And yes I do agree with Adnuo that specs should've been included.

One thing I didn't quite understand was that why arent' there temperature readings for the 6800 gt with the stock cooling? or is it something we're expected to go and find on "the other" articles or what?
Quote:
Another non-visible difference is the inclusion of a 92mm PWM fan for the CNPS9500-AT, allowing the motherboard to control the speed of the fan according to the temperature of the CPU, which is essential to keep noise at a minimum during low processor usage.
I'm having a hard time understanding the point in that sentence; is the fan itself temperature controlled somehow, a temperature sensor in it? - which would void the point of the motherboard control as far as I can tell? if that's not the point, what is it then?
As all fans can be controlled via a motherboard if the MB just supports adjusting the voltage of the fan connectors, the speciality of the fan eludes me - master of the obvious there, I know. It's possible that I'm about to make a fool out of myself, but I still dont - after carefully reading the paragraph several times - understand the point.

Nayway, interesting products and nice to read and get a better idea of their potential.
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