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Razer Copperhead Gaming Mouse

Razer Copperhead Gaming Mouse Specification & Design

Speccin' Hell!

There is no doubting that the Razer Copperhead has one of the most advanced specifications for a mousing device. It features the latest in laser technology from Agilent Technologies, as is used in Logitech's latest G5 and G7 laser mice - you could say that the two companies have the same level of performance, in that respect.

This is not an optical mouse, then, but is laser-based. Razer claim this makes it more accurate and sensitive than other mice on the market.

The Copperhead has a whopping 2000 DPI, 1000 Hz Ultrapolling with a 1ms response time and 32KB of on-board memory. The memory allows you to store configuration profiles for your mouse - the Copperhead has the ability to store five of these profiles. The profiles make setting up this mouse for different applications and games an absolute breeze.

Razer Copperhead Gaming Mouse Specification & Design
The seven buttons are independently programmable and it is possible to have the buttons set up completely differently for the five profiles. Not only that, but you can also change the DPI, sensitivity and polling rate via the profile system. It's also possible to adjust these on the fly by assigning two of the buttons to increase or decrease one or other setting.

Dead Sea Scrolls

The design is ambidextrous and is a little smaller than my current Viper mouse, at around 125x63x38mm. It also has 'non-slip' side rails that glow blue. The main buttons have the same rubber texture as the Viper, while the four additional buttons - two on each side - are underneath the non-slip side rails. The sides have a striped pattern that evokes the stripey skin Copperhead snakes are so famous for.

Razer Copperhead Gaming Mouse Specification & Design Razer Copperhead Gaming Mouse Specification & Design
The scroll wheel has small grooves in it, allowing for better grip, but the wheel feels like it is poking out a little too much. Using the scroll wheel as a button isn't quite as natural as it is with other mice that I've used. However, the click is a positive one. The scroll is click-based in the same way that the Viper is, but the scrolling is a little lighter on the Copperhead.

Some may not like the lighter scrolling action on this mouse, but I thought it was generally pretty good, if not quite to my preferences. Personally, I prefer the heavier click as I tend to like grasping the mouse rather than letting it flow through my fingers (Gosh, rather sounds all Crouching Tiger).