bit-tech.net

Why Web 2.0 will end your privacy

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jezmck 3rd June 2006, 14:42 Quote
So how long until bubble2.0 bursts?
And will it be as dramatic as the first burst?
saeghwin 3rd June 2006, 14:44 Quote
Wow, nicely written. They'll never know anything about me though--I don't use any services like that.
Skutbag 3rd June 2006, 15:02 Quote
So what if the man is going to know everything about you?

At least we'll be getting slightly more relevant junk mail.

Maybe they'll even start listening to us.
eddtox 3rd June 2006, 15:10 Quote
Disturbing. [deletes google cookies]

-ed out
ch424 3rd June 2006, 15:11 Quote
Quote:
Most people will take Web 2.0 to mean the rise of bloggers.

Whenever I hear "Web 2.0" I think of Maddox's article on blogs.

ch424
specofdust 3rd June 2006, 15:42 Quote
I seem to remember someone vaguely connected to google or one of those slightly less evil IT companies saying something along the lines of "Face it, on the internet, your privacy level is zero".

I think that's probably the case, and I think that's probably always been the case. The difference is that whereas a few years ago getting data out of people was complicated, you had to hack their computer(slow and inefficient) or or offer them prizes(can become expensive, and doesn't rake in that many people) to complete questionaires that are invariably misinterpreted and can give utterly useless data if made poorly, that sorta thing. Where-as with these modern services, it's easy, people are basicly saying "Here are my details, you can get more off me on the fly, gimme gimme gimme".

I think what you talk of is completely understandable, and for most people it's actually a very good thing.
Faulk_Wulf 3rd June 2006, 17:43 Quote
Great article. Really makes you think. Loved the ending.
Quote:

When the Web 2.0 bubble bursts - when the massive buyouts are done, the millionaires are made and the sites we love today are in the hands of big business - the innovation will grind to a halt, and what's left will be the endless grinding of the marketeering machine.

But hey - at least you'll be closer to your friends. And you'll have free photo hosting, too.
g3n3tiX 3rd June 2006, 17:57 Quote
Same thing...
Big brother is watching you, and then slapping you in the back :D With all the Web 2.0 hype, there's GOT to be something behind it, some kind of goal.
And you found it.

I'm still using my gmail account though.
Google anonymising
There you'll find a tool to zero out your google cookie : better than deleting it.
Works with FF and IE. You've got to be on one of googlel's pages for it to work.
ocha 3rd June 2006, 18:06 Quote
i thought you tube was doing a million dollars a month, not a day. Perhaps I am wrong though, I'm not sure I was listening properly.

Great article though, I have been thinking along these lines for a while.
RotoSequence 3rd June 2006, 19:14 Quote
Interesting points. Yet more reinforcement to the idea that information services are becoming more valuable than physical products. This is truly the information age - yet, its not the end users that have access to the information - at least, not anywhere near what News Corp, Yahoo!, and Google have.
Da Dego 3rd June 2006, 19:16 Quote
The question becomes...is this all that bad a thing?

All this marketing and the like...actual companies don't care about the individuals behind all this, we're simply helping them better understand trends. The data collected is not anonymous...but to the companies, it might as well be. They don't care about what one user is doing, they care about how users relate to other users to better understand effective advertising and target audiences. This simply helps them release better products to gain more market share.

So let's look at this for a minute...better products, better and more useful advertising that I might not be so annoyed at, and all for me getting to sign up for a free piece of software that is insanely useful for me. Wait, they're providing me a free product so they can release products that better deserve my money in the future, all whilst annoying me less in the process...

where do we lose, here?
AJB2K3 3rd June 2006, 19:43 Quote
If you have a personal web address i can get your home address without much effort?
specofdust 3rd June 2006, 20:06 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJB2K3
If you have a personal web address i can get your home address without much effort?

Well not really no, marketing companies generally sell peoples details in huge numbers, I very much doubt they'd bother to look up that sort of information, for the ammount of money that'd make it worthwhile asking them and not just getting a very high grade PI to do it.
Firehed 3rd June 2006, 20:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Da Dego
The question becomes...is this all that bad a thing?

All this marketing and the like...actual companies don't care about the individuals behind all this, we're simply helping them better understand trends. The data collected is not anonymous...but to the companies, it might as well be. They don't care about what one user is doing, they care about how users relate to other users to better understand effective advertising and target audiences. This simply helps them release better products to gain more market share.

So let's look at this for a minute...better products, better and more useful advertising that I might not be so annoyed at, and all for me getting to sign up for a free piece of software that is insanely useful for me. Wait, they're providing me a free product so they can release products that better deserve my money in the future, all whilst annoying me less in the process...

where do we lose, here?

Well, when Big Brother demands the information, it's there for them. Personally, my only reaction to advertising - however relavent - is negative. I know what I want and where I want it from. I block every ad I see (except Bit's, out of loyalty, but still largely ignore them). I had a layover at JFK airport the other day, and it was like sensory overload, a continuous babble of ads being slewn at me left and right, which accomplished nothing but giving me a pretty severe headache. I avoid sites with even the slightest bit of intrusive advertising, and avoid companies that use that intrusive advertising with extreme prejudice.

I don't care what I get out of it or whether I have nothing to hide; I don't want me out there.
cpemma 3rd June 2006, 21:59 Quote
Re "Privacy", not just the internet though. I use my Loyalty card in the supermarket and in return for 1% discount Tesco know just what I've bought, how often I shop, what might tempt me to spend more. Apparently with the coming RFID chips they'll also know what I've thought of buying and rejected.

Provided we have a choice of supplier it can only be good for me, they get my business when the price is right. They get my return business when the service is good.
unrealhippie 3rd June 2006, 22:19 Quote
Nice disturbing article, i'll sleep soundly tonight - thanks! :)
BlueDemon 3rd June 2006, 23:28 Quote
Nice article, and probably right on the mark.

I was a bit surprised and disappointed that Microsoft didn't get a mention. I mean, they have been inventorising user's demographics for years upon years now. The "convenience" of the Passport login system is actually a potent way of uniquely identifying and tracking users in just about every online move they make: Hotmail (for gathering addresses, mail topics, social fabric), MSN (same thing, only more of it), Xbox Live (mapping online gaming communities, creating game rankings and statistics). The scary thing is, they "own" you from the operating system upwards. For all I know they could be linking your real name (from your mail contents) to the speed of your CPU (reported by the OS) or to the websites you visit or to the fact that your copy of Windows does not meet WGA standards...
Nature 4th June 2006, 00:15 Quote
I've always assumed that "privacy" is an falacy! Especially on computer's.

Because I live in America, my phone can be tapped, my house can be raided, I can be pulled over in my vehichle, I can be imprisoned in a military facility indeffinetly for the sake of national secuirity, and with out probable cause or justification!!!!

I think the Internet will be policed and maintained by big bussiness and government....... like everything else!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I just came back from China and you can't blog like you can in our western nations, so have at it while you can willard!!!!!

To quote Strong Bad: "The Internet is a place where absolutly nothing happens"
julianmartin 4th June 2006, 00:28 Quote
This sort of thing makes me consider turning into a hermit. Maybe we should all unplug our computers and go back to entertaining ourselves by carving random statues out of wood?!
eddtox 4th June 2006, 01:21 Quote
I have had some time to think about this and while I'm still not 100% confortable with what is happening, I suppose if it improves our experience than it's a good thing. I'm still tempted to create an "anonymous identity" as I know that some of my beliefs don't sit well with the higher echelons of power. [I'm not paranoid! They really are after me!]

-ed out
Cthippo 4th June 2006, 02:38 Quote
Yes, but...

The only thing they know about you, at least based on what the article was talking about, are the things you post online. If you don't want people to know it, don't post it in a public space online. Maybe it's just me, but if I post somthing to a public site, suchj as this forum, or to my personal web site, I expect it to be in the public domain and can be known by anyone who bothers to look. On the other hand, what I buy online (with the exception of eBay) is not in the public domain and while someone could maybe steal the information, I don't lose sleep over it.

I guess my point is that the article is valid, but so what? What you post online is not private and never has been. Some things online are fairly private and other things are not. Just know which is which.
Cheap Mod Wannabe 4th June 2006, 07:09 Quote
Ahhh nothing like millions made from blackmailing famous people and politicians.... Uhh but then why those? Let's also take on cheating husbands and wives..... Uhh and then $50 to keep your parents from knowing that you made out with the Johnson's boy.

Uhhh GoogleSpy service..... Pay us and we will tract the subject... Easy access collected information... tracting through Google Earth... etc. etc.

Ha ha ha ha bring on the future... I'm ready, I'm one of them clean ones. I'm not afrai..d... eh... Oh wait that google search was a joke.... no no... don't... ahhh I was drunk I swear.
AJB2K3 4th June 2006, 09:13 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by specofdust
Well not really no, marketing companies generally sell peoples details in huge numbers, I very much doubt they'd bother to look up that sort of information, for the ammount of money that'd make it worthwhile asking them and not just getting a very high grade PI to do it.
You dont pay for this service and you dont know they release the info.
Its frealy available on the net.
Quote:

Registrant:


Domain name: CTHIPPO.COM

Administrative Contact:

Technical Contact:
Admin, Domain support@register4less.com
P.O. Box 191
St-Bruno, QC J3V 4P9
CA
+1.8779056500


Registration Service Provider:
Register4less, support@r4l.com
514-905-6500
http://register4less.com



Registrar of Record: TUCOWS, INC.
Record last updated on 05-Oct-2005.
Record expires on 20-Nov-2006.
Record created on 20-Nov-2004.

Domain servers in listed order:
NS1.DNS4LESS.COM 65.39.170.196
NS2.DNS4LESS.COM 65.39.170.204


Domain status: REGISTRAR-LOCK
For security and privisy deleted the personal details.
This is not the kind of thing i was expecting to find on the net :( :( :( :( :(
zeroSignal 4th June 2006, 09:47 Quote
Very interesting read, and I have to say, quite thought provoking.

Now, while I will agree that the big-wig buyouts of startups is happening at an alarming rate, I don't think that once it's all done that all innovation will stop. And there are several reasons for this.

First of all, it's never going to be 'all done'. There are always going to be new, simple startups that will grow and succeed. The Internet itself, unlike what US telecom corporations would like us to believe, succeeded because it offered a new interactive medium to the masses, and allowed loose control and loads of freedom. So there are always going to be bright people out there, coming up with great ideas. I distinctly remember a project started by two university graduates, that now is an everyday part of our lives. Google anyone?

And even if I'm wrong, even if it does happen, the net survived one bubble burst, and it will survive another one, even if the 2nd might be huge when compared to the 1st one.

There is room for concern. Your private information is being stored somewhere, but in all honesty, do you really care if Google is showing you ads while you read e-mail online? Actually, do you not block those ads with AdBlock? But the truth is, large corporations have always had your info, they've always tracked your habits, and followed patterns. Do you think they give you discount barcode-cards at large supermarkets because they like you?

I'd be more worried about governments knowing our surfing habits. Corporations already have it anyway..
eddtox 4th June 2006, 10:20 Quote
I think the point coming across from most of the posts here is that we don't care what they have - we care how they use it.

-ed out
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