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Archive for the ‘intel’ tag

Budget overclocking is back!

Posted on 30th Nov 2009 at 10:50 by Antony Leather with 25 comments

Antony Leather
I’ve felt a little lost over the last six months or so. AMD still hasn’t come back with a definitive answer to Intel's Core i7 and Core i5 CPUs and even they have been prohibitively expensive for many looking to upgrade from a Core 2 system.

Gone, it seems, are the days of the Core 2 Duo E1200 which could be bagged for less than £40. After a 100% overclock, it could turn into something that gave £150 CPUs a run for their money. I've used the CPU in several systems that I've built for people over the last few years, coupled one of the many budget uberclocking LGA775 boards that were pushed off the production lines.

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Hardware 8 - Many CPUs, Dream PCs and mobile gaming

Posted on 5th Nov 2009 at 18:17 by Podcast with 9 comments

Podcast
We're back with another Hardware Podcast - so good it's spelled in capitals. Rich, Harry and Clive get together to talk about all the hot (and just power-efficient) hardware of the last fortnight. Tune in to hear what we think of Intel's Atom (clue - it's not very good, is it?) VIA's new Nano processor and news on what Intel's up to.

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Own an Intel SSD? Tell how worn out it is!

Posted on 23rd Oct 2009 at 10:45 by Richard Swinburne with 28 comments

Richard Swinburne
Kingston dropped an interesting titbit that we thought we'd pass on to all Intel SSD owners - of which there's soon to be a lot more once the latest value X25-X drives arrive.

Basically, the biggest unknown factor in NAND Flash technology is wear and tear. The cells have a limited amount of data writes, so don't last forever, even though intelligent wear algorithms mean an MLC drive will last 10 years having written a few hundred GB a day to it - far more than any normal user will do.

One question that will get more important as time goes on is the second hand market: How can you account for wear if you're buying it off someone else?

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SSD performance tips for Intel chipsets and RAID-0

Posted on 16th Oct 2009 at 20:02 by Richard Swinburne with 4 comments

Richard Swinburne
We had a chat with the Kingston labs team this week in California and noted down some free performance improvements, and limitations, you should be aware of if you own one or more SSDs:
  • The Intel SATA ICH9R/10R/P55 controller under RAID-0 has a maximum real world performance capacity of about 600MB/s in total between it and the CPU.

    Despite the fact you'll need several (four+) SSDs to hit this limit at the moment, it's worth bearing in mind that to get ludicrous performance you'll need at least a PCI-Express x8 card.

    Until Intel increases its DMI and/or SATA controller bandwidth, this could prove a more regular limiting issue when future SATA 6Gbps parts arrive.

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Lab Update: Many-a-P55 Motherboard

Posted on 23rd Sep 2009 at 10:56 by Richard Swinburne with 16 comments

Richard Swinburne
I wouldn't be understating the situation when I say we've got a lot of P55 boards to get through: three Asus (P7P55D Deluxe, Vanilla and Maximus III Formula), two Gigabyte (UD5 and mATX UD4), three MSI (GD80, GD65 and CD53), ECS (something-or-other) and requests for more.

As it stands we've already reviewed the P7P55D Deluxe and found it just too expensive to justify a purchase. That's not Asus' fault, but Intel and Foxconn for making the platform cost just prohibitively expensive. To be honest, in the time we've already spent with the Gigabyte UD5 we highly suspect it to end up the same way.

In fact, we'd have had a full UD5 review already but someone got cake in the CPU socket. I kid you not.

Despite suffering assault via a Victoria sponge (we suspect, on evaluating the evidence), the board still worked and overclocked very well, even though six socket pins were damaged. The memory capacity constantly flicked between single 2GB and dual channel 4GB, so it took us all day to pin-point the problem with inconsistent results.

The plus side of all this is that we can conclude Intel's Lynnfield CPU and socket design is remarkably resilient to damage. And dessert. The downside is that it makes our job harder to work out what the hell is going on!

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One, Two, Seven - get ready for the recovery

Posted on 21st Sep 2009 at 15:32 by Tim Smalley with 7 comments

Tim Smalley
Over the past six months or so, it has become increasingly difficult to get excited about the computer hardware industry. Regular bit-tech readers have probably noticed my own output has dropped a little.

I've been focusing on the bigger picture (which included a lot of strategic work and a bit-tech site design refresh), and also turned some of my attention to new projects within Dennis that I'll be working on while I continue my role as Editor of bit-tech.

The lack of excitement is, in many respects, down to the recession - companies have been pulling down the hatches and boarding up windows while they weather the storm. There's been nothing exciting to talk about and it has been difficult to get hugely enthusiastic about the industry's future when nobody has announced a major technology breakthrough.

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Intel's next billion users

Posted on 18th Aug 2009 at 08:05 by Clive Webster with 14 comments

Clive Webster
A while back I read an interesting(ish) article on Ars Technica about Intel's drive into into the world of medical computing.

You can see why I added the 'ish'.

Medical computers might not exactly be scintillating, but Ars' angle made the story worth a read as it focussed on Intel's eagerness to enter new markets as being representative of its 'Next Billion Users' strategy. Let me explain...

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First Look: The first P55 RoG board, the Maximus III Formula

Posted on 10th Aug 2009 at 10:02 by Clive Webster with 17 comments

Clive Webster
Morning! I realise that when it comes to P55, most of you just want performance numbers, but sadly I can't quite put you out of your misery. I can however, offer a preview of what's likely to be a very special P55 motherboard - the first to wear the Republic of Gamers badge, namely the Maximus III Formula. Shots and discussion below the break.

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More shots of the Asus P55, LGA1156, Lynnfield motherboard

Posted on 30th Jul 2009 at 11:36 by Clive Webster with 11 comments

Clive Webster
Egads, just how many buzz-words can an IT journo fit into a blog post title these days? I blame Google, to whom all us online folk are beholden. Maybe I should just add a few hot search terms...

Or not. The purpose of this blog post is I thought I'd share some new shots Asus has sent through of its first P55 board to supplement James' preview of the Asus P7P55-Evo that went up a week or so ago.

Supposedly these are of the final retail board. The main update is the Southbridge cooler, which seems massive, and that weird Turbo-V thing. Pics and more discussion below the break.

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Series 3, Episode 3 - P55, Chrome OS, Monkey Island

Posted on 24th Jul 2009 at 18:52 by Podcast with 10 comments

Podcast
The mixer is back and so now Episode 3 of Series 3 of the combined Custom PC and bit-tech podcast is here. CPC’s Alex and Mark are joined by Richard and Joe from bit-tech. On the hardware side of things, the panel discusses the upcoming P55 chipset and Lynnfield CPUs from Intel. Software wise, Chrome OS from Google is cause for much discussion, and there is a lot of games news, including Battlefield 1943, Left 4 Dead 2 and of course, the return of Monkey Island.

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Styx: Master of Shadows Review

Styx: Master of Shadows Review

Styx's interesting approach to stealth is hindered by a lack of polish.
Mod of the Month October 2014 in association with Corsair

Mod of the Month October 2014 in association with Corsair

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