bit-tech.net

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

Posted on 4th Dec 2009 at 10:41 by Richard Swinburne with 13 comments

We had planned a whole article around this, but our Asus 5870 voltage tweak isn't playing ball and we can't work out why. During the review it worked perfectly, however after applying the waterblock and reinstalling the card it wouldn't overclock for toffee.

Unfortunately, after a day and a half of solid fiddling we had to call it a day and move on with other reviews. However - I couldn't pass up the opportunity to give our friends at EK some love, and show off their lovely waterblock.

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870
EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870


The block with the acrylic top looks gorgeous, and being solid copper also weighs a ton!

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

In the box there's a set of fitting instructions (READ THEM!) as well as all the screws and thermal pads that are essential to make this block work.

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

The memory pads are precut, however the pads for the power hardware require measuring and cutting by hand from the extra squares provided in the pack. It takes some time to do, but it's essential due to the way ATI designed its product.

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

With the pads fitted, it should look like this.

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

Then it simply requires screwing in...

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

EK Waterblock on the Radeon HD 5870

And finally, fitted, it looks like this. The barbs can be inserted either side, but it specifically requires short threads - so make note. While I can't give comparative numbers, I can say that connected to the Swiftech kit we previously reviewed except with a single 120mm radiator it runs lovely and cool, even under extended load. This being the case, it should happily allow for GPU core and memory overvolting along with copious amounts of overclocking, if your card allows.

13 Comments

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Jamie 4th December 2009, 11:50 Quote
Surprisingly basic design, though it should allow for high flow rates.
l3v1ck 4th December 2009, 12:08 Quote
What do you mean "Do NOT use them"?
You mean until after you've cut the right shape out?
Otherwise you've said do not use them, then used them anyway.
Bindibadgi 4th December 2009, 12:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by l3v1ck
What do you mean "Do NOT use them"?
You mean until after you've cut the right shape out?
Otherwise you've said do not use them, then used them anyway.

Sorry I had a massive brain fart. I meant you MUST use them. It's been changed. ;)
dec 4th December 2009, 13:59 Quote
really pretty block. with some UV active water itd be the fastest and coolest looking card on the market
logan'srun 4th December 2009, 13:59 Quote
are there stand-offs on the block?

Your volt tweak could come from the fact of overtightening the screws and thus bending the card - and that would play havoc with your tweaks.

IMHO all blocks should come standard with stand-offs to prevent overtightenning especially when you slap them on a rare and/or expensive card.
Combatus 4th December 2009, 15:21 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by logan'srun
are there stand-offs on the block?

Your volt tweak could come from the fact of overtightening the screws and thus bending the card - and that would play havoc with your tweaks.

IMHO all blocks should come standard with stand-offs to prevent overtightenning especially when you slap them on a rare and/or expensive card.

True, I've killed two cards by blocks either flexing the PCB too much or fouling something creating a short circuit. Some extra support would be a great idea given that your average person's GPU is the most expensive bit of kit in their system.
s3v3n 4th December 2009, 17:42 Quote
I don't like using screwdrivers for heatsinks. I usually screw on things with just the screw bit. That way I can't apply too much force. Tighten the screws around the core with a fair amount of force with thumb and index finger tips. The rest I just tighten down enough to get secure contact . With heatpads, you don't get any more cooling by getting it too tight anyways.
Rocket_Knight64 4th December 2009, 18:45 Quote
As nice as it is, nickle plating can only make it look better against the black PCB. More so with dyed water. :D
Bindibadgi 4th December 2009, 18:46 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by logan'srun
are there stand-offs on the block?

Your volt tweak could come from the fact of overtightening the screws and thus bending the card - and that would play havoc with your tweaks.

IMHO all blocks should come standard with stand-offs to prevent overtightenning especially when you slap them on a rare and/or expensive card.

Yea I admit it's pretty easy to REALLY tighten the chunky screws.
Squallers 5th December 2009, 12:40 Quote
pure guess here and you may have tried it but could it be that the voltage tweak app wont work unless it thinks something's connected to the card's fan header to make sure you don't brick your card?
vampalan 10th December 2009, 13:57 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squallers
pure guess here and you may have tried it but could it be that the voltage tweak app wont work unless it thinks something's connected to the card's fan header to make sure you don't brick your card?

I was going to say the same thing, so that would be it.. how about dangling the fan on there and see what happens?
Bindibadgi 10th December 2009, 14:00 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by vampalan
I was going to say the same thing, so that would be it.. how about dangling the fan on there and see what happens?

I've taken it all apart now sorry, but it's worth keeping in mind for the future! Thanks!
HourBeforeDawn 12th December 2009, 22:50 Quote
ya the Nickel plated blocks are just gorgeous. My second 4870 is starting to act up so Im going to take a part the block and remount it to see if there was something causing issues >< maybe the excuse I need to look into upgrading my cards lol.
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