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Build your own Router

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fisken 27th June 2008, 11:31 Quote
Nice one , but in the next , why not set it up for multiply external ip's, since more people have more than 1 ip.
Timmy_the_tortoise 27th June 2008, 12:34 Quote
I wish I could understand this.. I really do.
WildThing 27th June 2008, 12:44 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmy_the_tortoise
I wish I could understand this.. I really do.

+1

Yeah great article, never knew one could make one's own router! It's a shame about 99.9% of that stuff goes way over my head lol.
Bluephoenix 27th June 2008, 12:54 Quote
Great Guide


I use this stuff a good deal, since I work with a large set of linux servers and don't want to have to shell out massive amounts of cash for nortel or cisco hardware.

there are a few more hurdles to use fibrechannel with this method, mostly getting it to like the transmission format the fibrechannel cards use.


here's a suggestion for bit. get ken on your staff, pay him and feed him pizza for more of this stuff faster. ;)


the other thing that strikes me is how very well sectionalized and organized the whole article is, makes for very easy reference.
Woodstock 27th June 2008, 12:57 Quote
damm i actually tried to get something similar working this morning (used brctl as i only needed a bridge) but it wasnt compatible with ppp0 (at mums, and its a geographic limitation). Starts thinking about ditching the flats router (crappy dlink thing)
TomH 27th June 2008, 13:16 Quote
Interesting! More-so in the configuration than anything. I shall have a read later, but I thought I'd mention that I also decided to build my own router recently.

The thing's built, and I'm saving time by using m0n0wall, but I've not fully updated the article yet - still, someone may find it useful/interesting. :)

From the m0n0wall guidelines, however, I estimated that I should be able to gain about 280Mbits in both directions. That's not bad for the future.
theevilelephant 27th June 2008, 13:26 Quote
fantastic article! i really enjoy reading them, it gives me an excuse to tinker with a few spare linux machines, this one is going to require some carefull reading though, i think i got about 10% on the first read through :D
Timmy_the_tortoise 27th June 2008, 14:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildThing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmy_the_tortoise
I wish I could understand this.. I really do.

+1

Yeah great article, never knew one could make one's own router! It's a shame about 99.9% of that stuff goes way over my head lol.

Yeah, I assumed that the router itself (so far as what it consists of) was very much nothing to do with a PC...

But when I think about it.. I suppose it makes perfect sense that a PC/Server/whatever can route...
tuaamin13 27th June 2008, 15:18 Quote
What's the point of this? I can understand the concept but not the application. Are you supposed to add it to your existing machine/repurpose an old machine or build a new mini-ITX machine (one of those with multiple ports) instead of buying a new router?
Timmy_the_tortoise 27th June 2008, 15:22 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuaamin13
What's the point of this? I can understand the concept but not the application. Are you supposed to add it to your existing machine/repurpose an old machine or build a new mini-ITX machine (one of those with multiple ports) instead of buying a new router?

It's repurposing and old machine or building a new one from old parts.. Can you read, or not?
Valdisnei 27th June 2008, 17:03 Quote
Great guide!
Love it...
I'm going to read everything after...

homebuild router + diy homeserver... = mod! =D
Jasio 27th June 2008, 19:33 Quote
Heya,

Great guide! Just a quick note... if you prefer to NOT work with IP Tables but you still want the power and flexibility of IP Tables then I suggest downloading APF Firewall for Linux. APF is a front-end for IP Tables (hence, it's still IP Tables) but provides an easy to use shell based configuration file to setup your firewall. Additionally, APF includes brute-force and DoS protection which can be enabled/disabled in the config file. Of course, this is free software. I've used it for many years and it makes handling IP Tables far easier.

Cheers :)
Da Dego 27th June 2008, 21:04 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasio
Heya,

Great guide! Just a quick note... if you prefer to NOT work with IP Tables but you still want the power and flexibility of IP Tables then I suggest downloading APF Firewall for Linux. APF is a front-end for IP Tables (hence, it's still IP Tables) but provides an easy to use shell based configuration file to setup your firewall. Additionally, APF includes brute-force and DoS protection which can be enabled/disabled in the config file. Of course, this is free software. I've used it for many years and it makes handling IP Tables far easier.

Cheers :)
Hey Jasio,

Yeah, there are some great options. Most of my sysadmin friends swear by Shorewall themselves, which is the same type of thing. For here, though, we were going for stripping away the training wheels and showing you what REALLY goes on under the hood. The more you know, the more secure your system will be and the better you can diagnose when something DOESN'T work right. :)
Rexxie 27th June 2008, 22:09 Quote
For those wanting to set a PC up as a router, but don't want to go through the hassle of doing everything yourself, there are a number of really good options out there. m0n0wall (http://m0n0.ch/wall/) and pfsense (http://www.pfsense.com/) are good alternatives. m0n0wall is super-super lightweight and does the job really well, at least it does for me :-)
HowY 27th June 2008, 22:11 Quote
Just had to offer a "Great job" ;)
on this series of articles and a straight
up job with ipchains...

Cant wait for the whole series

Excellent Work!

--keep 'Em Coming
airchie 28th June 2008, 02:32 Quote
Yep, +1 here for the 'good job' sentiments.
I'm loving the linux stuff on Bit now and I'm thinking there should be a seperate section entirely for Linux tbh.
Isn't Linux and it's flexibility/modifiability (is that even a word? :D) like the software equivalent of building your own PC and tweaking/OCing it?

Anyway, keep 'em coming!! :)
DougEdey 28th June 2008, 02:47 Quote
100% Agree with airchie!
woodshop 28th June 2008, 04:00 Quote
I'll add my hardware recommendation.
pcengines ALIX2c3 board, i'm loving mine got it to run m0n0wall. eats a whoopee 18watts at most.
Woodstock 28th June 2008, 05:39 Quote
hmmm decisions, to go with a embedded system or tack it on to the fileserver, seperate would probably be more secure, if you dont mind answering how much did you pay woodshop, that one looks awesome, wonder if there is one with integrated wireless. would it be difficult to have two internal interfaces (Ethernet and wireless)
Burnout21 28th June 2008, 08:26 Quote
hmmm might have to look into this.

is there a way to add a wireless connection to this? as me and my girl friend like sitting in the garden on are laptops when the weather is good.

nothing better than MSN'ing your girl friend for a cuppa tea when she is sat right next to you! haha!
Glider 28th June 2008, 12:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rexxie
For those wanting to set a PC up as a router, but don't want to go through the hassle of doing everything yourself, there are a number of really good options out there. m0n0wall (http://m0n0.ch/wall/) and pfsense (http://www.pfsense.com/) are good alternatives. m0n0wall is super-super lightweight and does the job really well, at least it does for me :-)

I personally recommend IP Cop if you want a all in one router distro ;)
Woodstock 28th June 2008, 12:25 Quote
hmmm ive hit an odd problem set dnsmasq to allow the address 10.0.0.2 to 10.0.0.25 but when my laptop connects via dhcp it recieved a 169.x.x.x address
Azh_fx 28th June 2008, 13:03 Quote
i just browsed over this, biut why make your own, when you can buy one for postage

http://www.digidave.co.uk/jshop/section.php?xSec=30

or have i missed the plot?
airchie 28th June 2008, 13:16 Quote
Woodstock, it sounds like your PC isn't recieving an IP correctly from DHCP.
I'm guessing the IP it has is an APIPA one. ;)
Glider 28th June 2008, 13:42 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodstock
hmmm ive hit an odd problem set dnsmasq to allow the address 10.0.0.2 to 10.0.0.25 but when my laptop connects via dhcp it recieved a 169.x.x.x address

That indeed sounds like it doesn't receive an IP adress. Did you restart dnsmasq?

Also, did you allow the DHCP request on the firewall? (guess this is where your problem is located)
Code:
iptables -A INPUT -d $INTIP -p tcp --destination-port 67 -m state --state NEW -j ACCEPT

Also, for the ones that are intrested, I put up the full iptables script used in the guide over here

EDIT:
Code:
iptables -A INPUT -d $INTIP -p tcp --destination-port 53 -m state --state NEW -j ACCEPT
For DNS ;)
Code:
iptables -A INPUT -d $INTIP -p tcp --destination-port 647,847 -m state --state NEW -j ACCEPT
DHCP failover and failover2 ;)
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