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Build your own server: Part 2

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Glider 24th July 2007, 10:38 Quote
Woohoo ;)
yakyb 24th July 2007, 11:46 Quote
brilliant stuff
cant wait to move house so i can set all this stuff up (and annoy my GF in the process)
would love a PDF tho
chimaera 24th July 2007, 12:06 Quote
Man I've just finished setting everything up from the last one and along comes this :)

Mind you I added MythTV and Netatalk to the mix, and they took a bit of work to get working properly...
Seraphim Works 24th July 2007, 12:32 Quote
After playing around with clarkconnect, linux is still frustrating me. Actually, it's not linux per se, it's the total lack of support for hardware sometimes. Using ndis-wrapper just to attempt to get wireless working annoyed me no end.

It's good to see guides like this though, that show simple, easy to understand steps, hopefully we'll be seeing more Glider?
Zut 24th July 2007, 12:39 Quote
Nice article.

FC4 is pretty easy to install headlessly, if you just want a file/print/web server. And that was with only 128MB ram!
Glider 24th July 2007, 12:45 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seraphim Works
After playing around with clarkconnect, linux is still frustrating me. Actually, it's not linux per se, it's the total lack of support for hardware sometimes. Using ndis-wrapper just to attempt to get wireless working annoyed me no end.

It's good to see guides like, this though, that show simple, easy to understand steps, hopefully we'll be seeing more Glider?
Wireless has come a long way, but still isn't there quite yet. I search for Linux supportive/native chipsets (like Realtek, Intel, ...) and buy those mostly ;)

And more? Ask Brett, he forces me to do this ;)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zut
Nice article.

FC4 is pretty easy to install headlessly, if you just want a file/print/web server. And that was with only 128MB ram!
I have a webserver/MySQL dbase server running on a 600MHz with 28MB (32-4) of RAM based on Debian ;) Ok, only for testing/development, but still :)

My student house server (Fileserver, Media server [plays music], printserver,...) is also a 600MHz but with 60MB (64-4) of RAM :) also Debian based ;)
capnPedro 24th July 2007, 13:01 Quote
Very nice. However, may I recommend:

/usr/bin/startgui
Code:
#!/bin/bash
/etc/init.d/gdm start

/usr/bin/stopgui
Code:
#!/bin/bash
/etc/init.d/gdm stop

Remeber to
chmod 700 startgui
chmod 700 stopgui
Of course.

It's much easier to just type startgui/stopgui than having to remember /etc/init.d/gdm stop. Or maybe that's just me.
Tim S 24th July 2007, 13:05 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glider
And more? Ask Brett, he forces me to do this ;)
I force Brett to force you to do them... heheh ;)
Da Dego 24th July 2007, 13:32 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim S
I force Brett to force you to do them... heheh ;)
Hey now, nobody forces me to do anything...I chain glider to his laptop and beat him til an article pops out from the kindness of my heart. ;)


By the way, Digg to share! Thanks for the support!
Glider 24th July 2007, 13:35 Quote
Redefines "Hard labour" :)

EDIT: since it's unpayed work, am I a slave to Bit-tech now?
proxess 24th July 2007, 15:58 Quote
Well I'm not sure if your a slave, but you'll get a whipping if you don't work.
Andy Mc 24th July 2007, 18:01 Quote
My only issue with this is the round about way that it has gone.

After reading both articles to conclusion, would it have not been more prudent to start the whole shebang off with the 'Server' edition of Ubuntu to begin with instead of the normal edition and then strip stuff away? As this is virtually where you have ended up with part 2 of the guide.
Kipman725 24th July 2007, 19:14 Quote
This guides good. How about a more general guide for distros without package managment? or a desktop linux guide?
mclean007 24th July 2007, 19:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kipman725
This guides good. How about a more general guide for distros without package managment? or a desktop linux guide?
A desktop guide might be useful, but to be honest the normal Ubuntu install does such a damn good job that you hardly need to make many tweaks to get a very useable system. Seriously - plop live CD in drive, click install, watch the progress bar / make a cup of tea, a few clicks in the package manager and BOOM, you've got a fully functional desktop. Heck, half the stuff in part 1 was getting rid of the very useful (for a desktop) stuff the default installer brings to the table.

As for a more general guide, why? If you are a linux n00b, just go with Ubuntu - it's proven, it's very well supported by the developers and the community, and from my experience it generally just works solid as a rock. Only reasonably experienced users are going to have a real reason to want to go for one of the many other distros out there. Anyone in that position should be a little beyond this sort of by-the-numbers approach. In particular, you'd be daft to want to install a distro without package management if your knowledge of linux extends to a couple of six page articles on bit-tech.
Glider 24th July 2007, 19:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Mc
My only issue with this is the round about way that it has gone.

After reading both articles to conclusion, would it have not been more prudent to start the whole shebang off with the 'Server' edition of Ubuntu to begin with instead of the normal edition and then strip stuff away? As this is virtually where you have ended up with part 2 of the guide.
Yes, but originally there was no intent to make a followup article. I only wrote it because of demand.

And also if I would have started from the server install, there won't be a GUI installed at all, and a lot of new Linux users cling to GUI. Now they can use it when they need it and turn it off when they don't need it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kipman725
This guides good. How about a more general guide for distros without package managment? or a desktop linux guide?
Distros without a package manager (like LFS) require quite a lot more Linux knowledge. Dependencies and all... That's the power of package managers. And can you eaborate a bit more on what you mean by a desktop Linux guide?
capnPedro 24th July 2007, 19:29 Quote
A distro without package management? As in, compiling from source? Maybe not the best option for noobs ;).
Faulk_Wulf 24th July 2007, 19:46 Quote
Preface:
I have been reading alot about starting your own webserver and all the security risks involved. I have bookmarked several articles (which I'll happily spam in here if you care) and had planned on using Ubuntu Linux to do this. I am exactly the kind of person, I believe, that you were writing your article for. I am not new to computers and my knowledge is intermediate with more emphasis on hardware.

Content:
Two big questions: If you you have multiple computers on one router/wireless connection, will the security of those computers be compromised by the presence of a server (that may or may not be adequately secured). Also: Can I have people view my webserver without going through a DNS and paying $25. I mean that is the reason I want my own webserver: To get around the costs. If I created a static IP, could I just bind it to a service like DotTK or TinyURL. (Yes, the second option is far more impracticable, I know.)

Otherwise: Great article. I think there should be a big demand for articles such as these. Keep up the great work.
mclean007 24th July 2007, 20:37 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faulk_Wulf
Can I have people view my webserver without going through a DNS and paying $25. I mean that is the reason I want my own webserver: To get around the costs. If I created a static IP, could I just bind it to a service like DotTK or TinyURL. (Yes, the second option is far more impracticable, I know.)
If I understand your question correctly, you are asking how you can have your server be public facing through a friendly URL without paying for static DNS. This is EXACTLY what no-ip.org does, which is discussed on page 5 of the article. They offer a free service that redirects www.[yourhostname].no-ip.org to your server's IP address. No-ip also offers (free) client software that 'phones home' to their servers to keep them updated of your dynamic IP address when it changes. They offer this for free in the hope that you upgrade to some of their paid services.
capnPedro 24th July 2007, 20:47 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faulk_Wulf
If you you have multiple computers on one router/wireless connection, will the security of those computers be compromised by the presence of a server (that may or may not be adequately secured).
Very possible. The server should be placed in a DMZ so that other networked PCs do not establish trusted relationships with it.

As the server is externally accessible, if it has any vulnerabilities, the rest of your network will become compromised as the server gets pwned.
Glider 24th July 2007, 21:10 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by capnPedro
Very possible. The server should be placed in a DMZ so that other networked PCs do not establish trusted relationships with it.

As the server is externally accessible, if it has any vulnerabilities, the rest of your network will become compromised as the server gets pwned.
Not allways does your entire network get compromised. If you keep securing the rest of your workstations (which you should do), then they are equally as hard (maybe a bit less because on a LAN no ports are blocked) to hack. Unless you put the server in a DMZ. No connections from the DMZ to the LAN are allowed, so the LAN is safe.
proxess 24th July 2007, 21:48 Quote
If your worry about security issues, you could always try Nubuntu, which is a networking directed OS with an extremely light wight GUI/Window Manager, Openbox (<3) if i'm not mistaken. If not openbox, its fluxbox or blackbox. If you look into a hierarchy table of linux, the only Ubuntu relation of Nubuntu is the name. I don't remember where Nubuntu originates from tho.
Kipman725 24th July 2007, 21:55 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glider
Yes, but originally there was no intent to make a followup article. I only wrote it because of demand.

And also if I would have started from the server install, there won't be a GUI installed at all, and a lot of new Linux users cling to GUI. Now they can use it when they need it and turn it off when they don't need it.

Distros without a package manager (like LFS) require quite a lot more Linux knowledge. Dependencies and all... That's the power of package managers. And can you eaborate a bit more on what you mean by a desktop Linux guide?


I was thinking setting up a system as a desktop which is very hard to setup (asin nothing works straight off) and showing the process of getting various devices working. Myself I recently had trouble getting sound working on an old laptop running DSL... as I had never had sound problems in other distros (always just worked) I didn't know where to start and wasted loads of time. IN the end a very simple solution of using ALSA and an ALSA setup script worked but it was a case of just going through thing after thing for weeks before I hit upon what worked. Just knowing where to start with various problems would be a huge help. I don't know if anything like this is even possible though.

I like package managers but even in ubuntu I was faced with programs that needed compiling to run the latest version or had no package. I just compiled to get things running but I understand that various performance improvenements can be had by compiling yourself?

*at the moment I run two systems:
desktop running XP for gaming and watching films and web browsing and schematic capture
lappy running damm small linux, free dos duel boot for retro gaming and portable web browse/music/work
I also have a ubuntu server thats out of action atm

of those three systems the XP system has never had to compile software thats running on itself, the ubuntu I probobly had to compile about 1/10 of all installed programs and the damm small linux system I probobly compiled half the things it runs as it uses the 2.4 kernal and the mydsl package system has far from everything I need on it. Debian packages are dead slow on such a slow laptop also.
Glider 24th July 2007, 22:03 Quote
If you want small, core, nothing extra, lightweight and fast, I suggest you start reading the Gentoo Handbook. It describes everything you need to know, and a lot more :)
capnPedro 24th July 2007, 23:27 Quote
Linux: for people who want to get things done. Gentoo: for people who want to get things done after waiting 2 weeks for it to compile.
Nah, Gentoo's OK. But it can be a real PITA to get configured and compiled.

This post is pointless. Normal thread service will resume shortly.
Andy Mc 24th July 2007, 23:27 Quote
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glider

And also if I would have started from the server install, there won't be a GUI installed at all, and a lot of new Linux users cling to GUI. Now they can use it when they need it and turn it off when they don't need it.

That is a good point, but once webmin is installed they would have no need for the GUI. Webmin could be one of the first things to be installed via the CLI and it would go some way to improve usage for people new to Linux.
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